Zachary Seguin

REC Courses

REC 100 – Introduction to the Study of Recreation and Leisure

An overview of the broad field of recreation and leisure emphasizing the understanding of various leisure phenomena. As such, it provides the student with an introductory understanding of the nature and scope of leisure, leisure behaviour and affiliated recreation activity.

REC 101 – Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services

Using a wide variety of leisure service agencies as examples, this course introduces students to the nature and scope of leisure provision. Topics include program components, the classification and management of resources, professionalism, and current managerial trends and future developments.

REC 105 – Interdisciplinary Approaches to Leisure

This course examines the intersection of disciplines and methodologies that are the foundation of leisure studies. The major principles of each discipline and how they inform our understanding of leisure will be discussed. Some of the disciplinary foundations considered may include economics, geography, history, philosophy, planning, psychology, sociology, and the arts.

REC 107 – Sociology of Activity, Health, and Well-being

This course will focus on the social and cultural factors that influence leisure, activity, health and well-being in different settings and among different populations. Sociological literature will be used to examine activity, health, and well-being in the lives of individuals, groups, and society.

REC 120 – Program Management and Evaluation

The scope of recreation program design and delivery is examined with particular emphasis on needs assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation. This course emphasizes the application of the various management principles required for service delivery. A field trip fee estimated at $125 per student may be required.

REC 151 – Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation Practice

This course is designed to examine models, theories, tools, and techniques required in the design, facilitation, and evaluation of therapeutic recreation services for individuals and groups.

REC 172 – Special Topics in Leisure Studies 1

One or more term courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the Recreation and Leisure Studies Department. Subjects will be dependent upon special research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

REC 200 – Play, Creativity and Child Development

A critical analysis of definitions, concepts and assumptions of classical, recent and modern theories of play with implications for programming, planning and evaluating children's play.

REC 201 – Diversity and Leisure

This course focuses on what diversity means in leisure studies and explores why diversity matters by introducing issues related to inclusivity, privilege, power, marginalization, and oppression. Areas of exploration may include but are not limited to age, class and poverty, (dis)ability, non-human interactions, race and ethnicity, sexual and gender identities, and status.

REC 202 – History of Western Sport

This course considers the historical impact of Western sport. It traces the history from individual play through amateurism to professionalism, big business, and media. It examines sport's social role within local, national, and international communities, and its relationship to class, gender, leisure, race, and politics.

REC 203 – Sociology of Sport

This course examines sport in modern societies and the distinctive features of Canadian sport. Attention is directed to the relationship between sport and other institutions, including the economy and political system. Contemporary issues, including racial and gender inequality and controversies over violence and drugs are also considered.

REC 205 – Social Psychology of Leisure

A study of the effects of personality and social factors in shaping how people perceive, experience and respond to the availability of discretionary time. Current theory and research focusing on the impact of leisure on the socio-psychological adjustment of the individual and applications to the promotion of healthy leisure will be examined.

REC 213 – Principles of High Performance Organizations in Recreation and Sport

This course introduces students to the building blocks of high performance organizations. Principles such as social responsibility and innovation will guide the discussions. Specific emphasis will be given to leadership, critical thinking, and the development of problem solving skills to address societal and business challenges across multiple sectors.

REC 215 – Marketing Recreation and Sport Services

Exploration of marketing concepts and methods available to public, commercial and private leisure service organizations. Topics include: the marketing philosophy, market research, market segmentation, and marketing mix strategies related to programming, distributing, pricing and promoting leisure services.

REC 218 – Social Entrepreneurship for Change

This course examines social entrepreneurship as a means for improving individual and community well-being. Focus will be placed on learning and implementing tools which businesses, citizens, and consumers can use to address social issues. Students will complete the course with an understanding of their personal responsibility and role as community/ global citizen which will aid them in their career development. Particular emphasis may be placed on the role of social entrepreneurship in addressing issues related to social justice, inclusion, and sustainable management practices.

REC 220 – Program Management

The scope of recreation program design and implementation is examined with particular emphasis on needs assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation. This course emphasizes the application of the various management principles required for service delivery.

REC 230 – Outdoor Recreation Resources Management

The course examines human-nature relationships in leisure and tourism contexts from an interdisciplinary perspective. It integrates experiential learning with theoretical and critical inquiry to understand and analyze values, attitudes, cultures, programming, impacts, management, and contemporary issues and trends.

REC 251 – Therapeutic Recreation: Developmental and Emotional Disabilities

This course is designed to explore the etiology of disability and the role of therapeutic recreation in the lives of people with developmental and emotional disabilities.

REC 252 – Therapeutic Recreation: Physical Disabilities

This course is designed to explore the etiology of disability and the role of therapeutic recreation in the lives of people with physical disabilities.

REC 253 – Practicum in Therapeutic Recreation

This course involves an unpaid practical experience for students in Honours Therapeutic Recreation. The placement supervisor must be approved by the academic supervisor prior to registering for the course. The practicum will require 105 hours interspersed over 1 academic term (15 weeks). The course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.

REC 270 – Research Design Applicable to Leisure Studies

An introduction to the methods and techniques of research as applied to leisure studies and services. General consideration will be given to the technical issues involved in various stages of research with emphasis on the logic underlying the research process.

REC 272 – Special Topics in Leisure Studies 2

One or more term courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the Recreation and Leisure Studies Department. Subjects will be dependent upon special research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

REC 280 – Introduction to Tourism

The scope and nature of tourism as a contemporary leisure experience is examined along with economic, political and social ramifications, research strategies employed and implications for the future.

REC 301 – Sociology of Leisure

This seminar style course focuses on recent research on relationships between leisure and the social, cultural, political, and technological aspects of society. The course will use sociological literature to examine leisure in the lives of individuals, groups, and society. Topics will include leisure and multiculturalism, social stratification, gender, popular culture, consumption, tourism, religion, and the family.

REC 304 – Culture and Recreation

A study of major issues of Canadian cultural policy from a socio-historical, political and sociological perspective. Students will examine the role and organizational structure of the arts and major cultural agencies, and discuss social, economic and administrative aspects of professional, amateur, commercial and public art organizations and services.

REC 306 – Contemporary Health Issues for Women

This course draws on a range of feminist theories and frameworks to examine the interconnections between women and health in local, national, and international contexts. Topics may include the medicalization of women's health; reproductive experiences, choices, technologies and rights; health care systems and institutions; health policy; and the links with leisure, recreation, and health. Intersections of gender with race, ethnicity, religion, class, sexuality, and aging will also be addressed.

REC 309 – History and Philosophy of Leisure

An examination of the major philosophical ideas and socio-cultural determinants as they have influenced leisure behaviour through the ages.

REC 311 – Event Management

Students will gain a broad understanding of event management from a theoretical and applied perspective with an emphasis on best practices and current trends utilizing case studies throughout. Students will gain an understanding of the breadth of the event "industry" and the various impacts of special events. The course includes instruction in the core areas of event planning, logistics, risk management, human resources, sponsorship and financial management, event marketing, and evaluation techniques.

REC 312 – Practicum in Recreation, Sport, and Tourism

REC 312 involves an unpaid placement in an organization related to recreation, sport, business or tourism. Placement opportunities will be facilitated by the course instructor, in partnership with the supervising organization.The placement will require 105 hours interspersed over one academic term (15 weeks). The completion of these hours will be determined by the placement supervisor, in consultation with the student. The course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis. Department consent is required for enrolment.

REC 313 – Mobilizing Resources for Recreation and Sport Delivery

This course focuses on mobilizing resources in high impact public and not-for-profit sector organizations. Topics may include developing strategic partnerships, securing financing, sponsorships, grants and donations, enabling co-production, harnessing social capital, support from volunteers, and alternative forms of service delivery.

REC 314 – Quality Assurance in Recreation and Sport Services

This course reviews the quality assurance literature and places it in the context of leisure services. The course is multi-disciplinary in its approach to quality assurance drawing primarily from social psychological, marketing and management sources. Emphasis is placed on the characteristics of services, staffing and systems/control issues. The course is suitable for all students interested in planning of programs and services.

REC 316 – Financing Recreation and Sport Services

Exploration of financial options available to public and private leisure service organizations. Topics include: foundations of financing and resource acquisition including budgeting, taxes and debentures, and less-than-fee simple approaches; direct partnerships including inter-agency cooperation, privatization, contracting, exactions, facilitation and co-production; and support from external sources including donations, sponsorships, foundations, and volunteers.

REC 333 – Recreation Geography

Implications of existing and potential recreation supplies and demands. Topics include recreational travel, site capability, economic and ecological impact models and behavioural aspects of amenity resources.

REC 334 – Introduction to Park Management

Introduction to the categories, administrative arrangements and functions of parks, including planning and management of parks at all government levels, with emphasis on law, policy system planning, management planning, site planning and management. The course will emphasize international aspects of park management.

REC 348 – Cultural Management 1

An introduction to the problems and techniques of contemporary not-for-profit cultural management. Topics include: budgeting and financial control, marketing and board/management relations.

REC 350 – Therapeutic Recreation Process and Program Management

This course is designed to examine models, theories, tools, and techniques required in the design, facilitation, and evaluation of therapeutic recreation services for individuals and groups in a variety of therapeutic recreation settings.

REC 351 – Therapeutic Recreation Facilitation Techniques

This course is designed to examine the scope of modalities and facilitation techniques used by therapeutic recreation professions in the facilitation of therapeutic recreation interventions for individuals and groups in a variety of therapeutic recreation settings. The University of Waterloo policy on Class Attendance during the first week of class (http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/Acad-Regs-Class-Attendance) will be strictly enforced.

REC 354 – Leisure Education - Concepts and Practices

The course covers the development and implementation of leisure education for a variety of client groups and diverse settings with special attention to therapeutic recreation. Various models, theories, program developments, adaptations and teaching techniques relevant to leisure education will be explored.

REC 356 – Leisure and Community

This course covers concepts, theories, models, and issues relevant to understanding relationships between leisure and community. Areas of discussion may include the roles of leisure as a context for community building and development, critical understandings of relationships between community and leisure, as well as approaches to community building through leisure. Opportunities for experiential and collaborative learning will form major components of the course and a volunteer placement may be required. Attendance at the first class is required.

REC 357 – Theories and Evidence for Therapeutic Recreation Practice

This course is designed to examine theories, concepts, and evidence informing the design and facilitation of therapeutic recreation practice.

REC 361 – Aging and Leisure

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the characteristics of the aging population, particularly as related to recreation, leisure, and lifestyle. It focuses both on the theoretical aspects of aging and their implications for leisure and on the practical aspects of recreation and leisure program development, delivery, and facilitation for all older adults.

REC 362 – Sociology of Aging

An introduction to individual and population aging. Topics discussed include: aging from a historical and comparative perspective; aging in subcultures; aging and the social structure; aging and social processes; aging and the environment; work and retirement; and aging and leisure patterns.

REC 371 – Quantitative Approaches to Leisure Research

An exploration of quantitative research approaches, including descriptive and inferential statistics, and interpretation of data. Students conduct statistical analyses to understand social, cultural and environmental issues.

REC 372 – Special Topics in Leisure Studies 3

One or more term courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the Recreation and Leisure Studies Department. Subjects will be dependent upon special research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

REC 373 – Qualitative Approaches to Leisure Research

An exploration of qualitative methodologies used in the fields of leisure. Philosophies, theoretical orientations, and ethical considerations will be emphasized as students discuss and participate in various approaches to research design, data collection, analysis, and representation.

REC 375 – International Exchange

Study in Recreation topics by International Exchange.

REC 380 – Tourism Analysis

This course utilizes a variety of methodological approaches in the analysis of tourism management, development, and planning. Approaches may include problem-based learning, experiential education, case studies, qualitative and quantitative data analysis. Students will address contemporary issues related to tourism such as community engagement, health and well-being, sustainability, and economic development.

REC 383 – Perspectives on International Tourism

The character, problems of, and prospects of tourism are examined through consideration of tourism in a variety of countries and regions, both developed and developing. Topics include the nature and significance of tourism; economic, environmental and social impacts of tourism; and costs and benefits of tourism to destination areas.

REC 401 – Advanced Seminar on the Socio-Cultural and Behavioural Dimensions of Leisure

This course is designed for senior students who are interested in the social sciences as a way of understanding factors that influence leisure behaviour and the role of leisure in the lives of individuals and their communities and social institutions. Students will have an opportunity to expand their understanding of leisure issues and problems facing society, thereby building on previous course work, personal experience and media. The small group setting of the seminar will provide students with the opportunity to explore their leisure research interests.

REC 405 – Leisure and Well-being

This course examines relationships between various aspects of leisure and well-being from a holistic perspective. Both positive and negative implications of leisure and recreational pursuits for well-being are considered for individuals, communities, and environments.

REC 408 – Gender and Leisure

This seminar course focuses on recent theoretical and empirical research on the relationships between gender and leisure. Topics will include analysis of men's and women's leisure experiences, attitudes, constraints, challenges, and behaviours. Gendered aspects of leisure will be explored in a variety of social and cultural contexts, including families, informal and social settings, organized leisure, and the media.

REC 413 – Innovative Solutions in Recreation and Sport Business

This capstone course allows students to reflect upon and integrate insights and skills they have gathered during their studies. Specifically, students will draw upon knowledge gained in previous courses and relevant work experience to identify and address complex managerial challenges. These challenges may be social and/or organizational in scope, and approaches used may be multi-sectorial in nature. Students will develop plans and measures that confront those challenges in innovative ways that best achieve stated goals and objectives.

REC 415 – Consumer Research in Recreation and Sport Services

This seminar style course will examine consumer behaviour theory in a broad context and focus specifically on consumer research in leisure contexts. Application of these issues to the effective marketing of public, private, nonprofit, and commercial leisure delivery systems will be explored.

REC 416 – Principles of Recreation Planning

An exploration of alternative approaches to the planning of recreation opportunities with an emphasis on community and municipal settings. The demand for and supply of recreation opportunities; standards, models and systems; recreation planning policies and agencies; and selected recreation planning issues.

REC 420 – Advanced Program Evaluation in Leisure Services

Students will acquire knowledge and skills to plan and conduct evaluations of leisure services and programs. The course will cover pre-evaluation, needs assessment, goals and outcomes, evaluation designs, process and outcome evaluation, report preparation, evaluation politics, and ethics.

REC 422 – Urban Recreation

This course examines the employment of recreation, sport, and tourism to transform, enliven, and/or alter community spaces. In doing so, it explores the potential of (re)shaping, (re)territorializing, and (re)making the built environment with the intent of interpreting, narrating, and imagining places to inscribe them with meaning and value. With an emphasis on principles of transformative placemaking, students are encouraged to envision meaningful alterations of places to better meet the needs of communities.

REC 425 – Heritage Planning Workshop

The role of cultural heritage in the community context is examined. Varying forms of heritage preservation, its function and organization are covered. This course may include a field component.

REC 433 – Ecotourism and Communities

A field course typically based out of the Waterloo Summit Centre for the Environment in Huntsville, Ontario. The course focuses on the philosophical, socio-cultural, health, and ecological dimensions of ecotourism, and the skills and practices necessary for planning and managing ecotourism for community development and well-being. The course will involve one or more overnight excursions to ecotourism destinations in the Muskoka or Haliburton region.

REC 437 – Ecosystem and Resource Management in Parks/Natural Areas

This course examines how ecosystem principles and techniques are used in planning and operations in regulated lands, parks, and protected areas. Conservation of biological diversity, ecological integrity, and sustainable resource use are major themes. Students learn population and community ecological modelling and related univariate and multivariate analytical techniques pertaining to ecosystem management. Comparisons of management frameworks illustrate modelling and analytical techniques for the forestry, agricultural, mining, fishing and energy sectors. A field assignment gives experience in assessment and analysis. Guest lectures by professionals in the conservation, parks and resource sectors augment student experience.

REC 450 – Internship for Therapeutic Recreation

This internship course requires that a student engage in a period of practical Therapeutic Recreation (TR) work at an approved site under the supervision of a qualified Therapeutic Recreation professional and an academic supervisor. During this practical experience, the student will research and analyze issues and complete required assignments related to TR practice. Normally, a full-time, consecutive, 15 week therapeutic recreation internship with a minimum of 560 hours is required. Those students in an approved co-op work term will have REC 450A waived and replaced with a REC elective.

REC 450A – Internship for Therapeutic Recreation

This internship course requires that a student engage in a period of practical Therapeutic Recreation (TR) work at an approved site under the supervision of a qualified Therapeutic Recreation professional and an academic supervisor. During this practical experience, the student will research and analyze issues and complete required assignments related to TR practice. Normally, a full-time, consecutive, 15 week therapeutic recreation internship with a minimum of 560 hours is required. Those students in an approved co-op work term will have REC 450A waived and replaced with a REC elective.

REC 450B – Internship for Therapeutic Recreation

This internship course requires that a student engage in a period of practical Therapeutic Recreation (TR) work at an approved site under the supervision of a qualified Therapeutic Recreation professional and an academic supervisor. During this practical experience, the student will research and analyse issues and complete required assignments related to TR practice. Normally, a full-time, consecutive, 15 week therapeutic recreation internship with a minimum of 560 hours is required.

REC 455 – Advanced Seminar in Therapeutic Recreation

This course is designed to facilitate an in-depth exploration and analysis of philosophical issues and interdisciplinary theories to discuss how they relate to therapeutic recreation practice and research.

REC 471A – Honours Thesis

An independent research project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty member. REC 471A includes an approved design and completion of the first segment of the paper. REC 471A requires the completion of REC 471B. REC 471B requires the completion of the project begun in REC 471A.This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.

REC 471B – Honours Thesis

An independent research project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty member. REC 471A includes an approved design and completion of the first segment of the paper. REC 471B requires the completion of the project begun in REC 471A.

REC 472 – Special Topics in Recreation and Leisure Studies 4

One or more term courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the Recreation and Leisure Studies Department. Subjects will be dependent upon special research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

REC 475 – Directed Study in Special Topics

For the student who desires to pursue a particular topic in depth through guided independent research. A faculty member must approve a student's project prior to enrolment.

REC 480 – Advanced Seminar in Tourism Development

This seminar-type course provides students an opportunity to situate their past learning and work experience with broader contemporary and critical issues associated with tourism development, sustainability, society, and both individual and community well-being.

REC 600 – Integrative Seminar in Recreation and Leisure Studies

An examination and discussion of the definitions, concepts and theories used in recreation and leisure studies. The seminar seeks to identify and discuss current theories, methods, and issues, and to examine the concepts of professionalism and scientific inquiry as they apply to the field of recreation.

REC 601 – Epistemological and Methodological Issues in Leisure Research

A critical examination epistemological and methodological issues in leisure research. Emphasis is placed on the main perspectives in the field, as well as on research design using different methodological approaches. The course includes discussions of issues and consideration in developing research proposals.

REC 603 – Leisure and Social Policy

Borrowing from a variety of social science disciplines, this course centres on the politics of leisure policy and administrative practice, as well as the range of collective leisure-related responses to social problems and issues related to contemporary social life. In so doing, both the utility and countereffects of leisure, broadly defined, are considered. Where possible, Canadian examples are used to illustrate course content.

REC 605 – Social and Psychological Analysis of Leisure

Social and psychological research on leisure and the interrelationships among leisure and other domains of contemporary life will be examined. Current issues relating to leisure as a dimension of lifestyle, human development and quality of life will also be explored, as will the relevance of this research to recreation practice.

REC 608 – Seminar in Gender and Leisure

This seminar course will focus on research related to gender and leisure. This will include examination of the effect of gender on leisure meanings, constraints and participation, and the effect of leisure activities on gender relations. Particular attention will be given to gender and feminist theory and to the intersections between paid work, unpaid work, family and leisure.

REC 609 – Internship in Recreation Service

A structured experience in a specified community agency to provide the student with the opportunity to relate theory and practice. A minimum of 50 hours per term will be required. Approval of Faculty Supervisor and Field Supervisor; Faculty Supervisor to assign grade via final written report, in consultation with Field Supervisor.

REC 610 – Administrative Practice in Recreational Service

An examination of the processes involved in policymaking, planning and management, and the development of problem-solving skills with respect to leisure service delivery systems. Special attention is given to settings under governmental auspices.

REC 615 – Consumer Research and Marketing Leisure Services

Marketing philosophy, segmentation, and marketing mix issues will be explored in the context of leisure services delivery with special attention given to public not-for-profit contexts. Current consumer research conducted in leisure contexts will be critiqued with focus on ego involvement, loyalty and commitment, group decision making, and travel role preferences.

REC 630 – Policy and Planning of Nature-based Recreation and Tourism

The course deals with the theoretical principles underlying recreation and tourism planning within ecologically sensitive landscapes and areas. The social, economic and environmental impacts of tourism are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to national parks and protected areas. The course has an international emphasis.

REC 640 – Community Development, Capacity Building and Leisure

Examination of community development and individual and collective capacity building related to leisure behaviour and services. The analysis includes the role of the citizen in policy development and service provision. The course will focus on non-governmental and governmental sponsored initiatives and will include such topics as community organization, social development, leadership, participation, and empowerment.

REC 650 – Critical Reflections on Disability, Illness and Leisure

This course engages a critical disability perspective to examine leisure in the lives of persons labelled as (dis)abled. Drawing on a multidisciplinary and historical approach, the course explores the intersection with other experiences of marginalization such as age, illness, race, ethnicity, poverty, gender, and sexual orientation and the blurred boundaries between these categories of experience.

REC 651 – Philosophical Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation

This course examines the philosophical and theoretical issues related to TG practice incorporating ethical and moral choice, relationship building, interpretation of research data/research analysis, professionalism, diversity and models of care.

REC 652 – Knowledge-Based Practice in Therapeutic Recreation

This course explores various knowledge sources, how it is produced and used as a foundation for the design and implementation of TR programs. This includes knowledge from empirical research (evidence), practitioner experiential knowledge, and as a particular emphasis this course will explore how our clients also know and how that knowledge may be valued in program design and delivery.

REC 672 – Quantitative Research Data Analysis and Interpretation

Examines and applies a variety of statistical techniques used in the analysis of leisure research data. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and implications of empirical research in the field. Note: An undergraduate statistics course and permission of the instructor is required.

REC 673 – Qualitative Research Data Analysis and Interpretation

This course examines and applies a variety of techniques used in the analysis of qualitative research data. A range of traditions and approaches will be explored in the course of acquiring training in qualitative analysis. An introduction to computer software to assist in the management and organization of qualitative data will be included.

REC 680 – The Dynamics of Tourism

An in-depth examination of factors related to tourists including but not limited to issues of community, environmental management and aspects of planning and policy. The course will also critically examine research methods employed to assess these factors.

REC 685 – The Structure of Tourism

An examination of the sectors, organizations, delivery systems, and provincial/federal strategies that comprise and shape contemporary tourism. The course will also explore the nature of the tourism product and destinations. Concepts, methods, and data sources for measuring the magnitude of tourism as an economic sector as well as basic performance indices for tourism destinations will also be covered. The emphasis of the course will be on tourism in Canada.

REC 695 – Selected Topics in Recreation and Leisure Studies

Topic(s) to be negotiated on an individual or small group basis with members of the faculty.

REC 696 – Topics in Administration and Management for Services

Topic(s) to be negotiated on an individual or small group basis with members of the faculty.

REC 697 – Selected Topics in Recreation and Leisure Resources

Topic(s) to be negotiated on an individual or small group basis with members of the faculty.

REC 700 – Foundations of Knowledge in Leisure Studies

An examination of the different paradigmatic perspective that influence the multidisciplinary field of Leisure Studies. The interrelationships among paradigms, theories, epistemologies, and methodologies are explored, with particular attention to their application to current research in the field. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

REC 730 – Fundamentals of Work and Health

This course will provide an overview of current thinking on work and health by introducing students to major substantive topics in the area from a multi-disciplinary perspective. The course will critically examine a variety of topics that may be investigated from different disciplinary perspectives. Classes will include presentations by faculty members representing different disciplines in the collaborative program. Examples of topics discussed in a given term may include work-stress relationships, healthy workplaces, and vulnerable populations.

REC 731 – Approaches to Research in Work and Health

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to different ways of designing and implementing research within the topic area of work and health as well as some of the practical, political and ethical challenges. The course content will include an examination of the epistemological positions associated with different types of research questions, analysis of case studies of research in work and health, and discussions of proposed research questions and proposals that examine problems from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The course will also include presentations by researchers and practitioners from the work and health domain, who will facilitate discussions on the challenges and opportunities of conducting and applying research in this area.

REC 732A – Work and Health Research Seminar (I)

This seminar is a forum for student presentations about results of or proposals for research. Invited speakers will also present results of research from time to time. Attendance at the seminar is required for two terms (i.e., during the candidates' first two years in the program). Attendance beyond that is encouraged. The range of topics that will be addressed in the seminar crosses all areas of investigation in the collaborative program. Grading will be on a credit/no credit basis.

REC 732B – Work and Health Research Seminar (II)

This seminar is a forum for student presentations about results of or proposals for research. Invited speakers will also present results of research from time to time. Attendance at the seminar is required for two terms (i.e., during the candidates' first two years in the program). Attendance beyond that is encouraged. The range of topics that will be addressed in the seminar crosses all areas of investigation in the collaborative program. Grading will be on a credit/no credit basis.

REC 750 – Fundamentals of Aging, Health and Well-being

This survey course will be team-taught by members of the collaborative program and will serve to introduce students to major sub-areas of aging, health and well-being research. Topics will be covered from each Department within the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences.

REC 751 – Aging, Health and Well-being Research Seminar

This seminar is a forum for student presentations about results of, or proposals for research. Invited speakers will also present results of research from time to time. Attendance at the seminar is required for two terms (i.e., during the candidates' first two years in the program). The range of topics that will be addressed in the seminar crosses all areas of investigation in the collaborative program. Grading will be on a credit/no credit basis. Must be registered in the PhD program in Aging, Health and Well-being.

REC 792 – Advanced Research Methods

This is a supervised research experience. The student arranges to work on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member who utilizes specific methodological and/or statistical procedures of interest to the student. The course may involve aspects of data collection, analysis or interpretation within the purview of a research project. The exact nature of the experience will be determined in collaboration with the project supervisor.

REC 798 – Advanced Topics in Leisure Studies

An in-depth analysis of specific topics of interest. The particular topics for a given term will be determined by the interests of the faculty and participating students. The form of the study may include a literature review or the planning and execution of an independent research study leading to a major paper.