Zachary Seguin

PSYCH Courses

PSYCH 101 – Introductory Psychology

A general survey course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and techniques of modern psychology as a behavioural science.

PSYCH 101R – Introductory Psychology

A general survey course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and techniques of modern psychology as a behavioural science.

PSYCH 121R – Introductory Psychology

A general survey course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and techniques of modern psychology as a behavioural science.

PSYCH 207 – Cognitive Processes

An examination and evaluation of selected topics dealing with human information processing such as attention, memory, pattern recognition, consciousness, language, dyslexia, decision making, and problem solving.

PSYCH 211 – Developmental Psychology

A course designed to introduce the student to current research and theory concerning children's social, cognitive, and physical development from infancy through childhood to early adolescence.

PSYCH 212 – Educational Psychology

A consideration of the main variables affecting learning in the classroom with special focus upon the conditions essential to efficient learning.

PSYCH 212R – Educational Psychology

A consideration of the main variables affecting learning in the classroom with special focus upon the conditions essential to efficient learning.

PSYCH 213R – Exceptional Children

Educational issues associated with cognitive, emotional, sensory, and physical differences and challenges.

PSYCH 218 – Psychology of Death and Dying

Variations in the meaning and significance of death and dying will be considered from a psychological perspective, with particular attention to the contexts (e.g., cultural, familial, life-span developmental) in which these variations occur.

PSYCH 220R – Social Psychology

An introduction to the scientific study of social behaviour and social influences on behaviour. Theories and research on such topics as attitude change and persuasion, stereotypes and prejudice, conformity and obedience to authority, altruism, conflict, attraction and love may be introduced.

PSYCH 221R – Interpersonal Relations

A psychological analysis of social interaction and the dynamics of close relationships.

PSYCH 222R – Cross-Cultural Psychology

This course focuses on human psychology (behaviours, cognition, emotion, motivation, and personality) across cultures, with the aim of raising awareness and understanding of human commonality and diversity. It examines theoretical, methodological, and ethical issues in cross-cultural psychology in light of the current literature.

PSYCH 226R – Positive Psychology

This course surveys theories and studies related to human strength and positive human functioning, with a focus on the psychological aspects of a fulfilling life. Topics include optimism, creativity, humour, resilience, wisdom, empathy, love, friendship, achievement, and happiness.

PSYCH 230 – Psychology and Law

Psychological principles drawn from a variety of subdisciplines (e.g., social, clinical, cognitive) will be surveyed in terms of their relevance and application to the legal system. Topics may include jury selection and decision-making, eyewitness testimony, insanity defense, competency assessment, risk assessment, and attitudes toward law and the legal process.

PSYCH 231 – The Psychology of Religious Experience

Approaches of traditional psychological theories toward phenomena of religious experience, mysticism, and prayer are examined. The psychological process of creating and naming 'gods' is considered as well as comparisons among altered states of consciousness including some forms of prayer.

PSYCH 232 – Psychology of Evil

Psychological perspectives concerning definitions, causes, and consequences of institutional and personal evil, as well as symbols and interpretations of evil in both religious and secular contexts, will be considered.

PSYCH 235 – Psychological Perspectives on Gender and Sex

The course focuses on the existence of and bases for sex and gender differences with emphasis on biological, psychological and cultural issues.

PSYCH 236 – A Psychological Analysis of Human Sexuality

This course will examine psychological and social psychological theories and empirical investigations of human sexuality.

PSYCH 238 – Organizational Psychology

Survey of organizational, group, and individual processes involved in work motivation, group dynamics, leadership, organizational climate and organizational culture.

PSYCH 253 – Social Psychology

An introduction to the scientific study of social behaviour and social influences on behaviour. Theories and research on such topics as attitude change and persuasion, stereotypes and prejudice, conformity and obedience to authority, altruism, conflict, attraction and love may be introduced.

PSYCH 253R – Social Psychology

An introduction to the scientific study of social behaviour and social influences on behaviour. Theories and research on such topics as attitude change and persuasion, stereotypes and prejudice, conformity and obedience to authority, altruism, conflict, attraction and love may be introduced.

PSYCH 256 – Introduction to Cognitive Science

Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary study of mind and intelligence. This course will draw on philosophy, psychology, artificial intelligence, linguistics, neuroscience, and anthropology to address central questions about the nature of thinking. Topics discussed will include mental representation, computational models of mind, and consciousness.

PSYCH 257 – Psychopathology

This course offers an introduction to understanding, assessing, and treating mental illness from a psychological perspective. Course material will focus on various categories of abnormal behaviour, including personality, anxiety, and mood disorders, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. Clinical methods of assessment, diagnosis, and intervention will also be considered.

PSYCH 257R – Psychopathology

This course offers an introduction to understanding, assessing, and treating mental illness from a psychological perspective. Course material will focus on various categories of abnormal behaviour, including personality, anxiety, and mood disorders, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. Clinical methods of assessment, diagnosis, and intervention will also be considered.

PSYCH 261 – Physiological Psychology

Introduction to brain, basic physiological processes, and their roles in behaviour. Topics may include: sensing and perceiving; neural bases of action; motivation; learning and memory; and consciousness. Both experimental and clinical data are considered.

PSYCH 264 – Research Apprenticeship

Students are introduced to the research process by participating in an unpaid apprenticeship of 96 hours in a faculty member's research lab in the Psychology Department. Apprenticeship hours will be completed before the end of the lecture period for the term of enrolment. Application forms are available on the Psychology undergraduate website. Grading is on a credit/no credit basis. Paid or volunteer positions obtained outside the context of this course are not eligible for credit in this course. [Offered: F,W,S.]

PSYCH 291 – Basic Research Methods

This course introduces the methods used to observe, quantify, summarize, and describe behaviour in empirical psychological science. It focuses on research design and the interpretation of results. [Offered: F]

PSYCH 292 – Basic Data Analysis

An introduction to the logic and methods of descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on application in Psychology. Topics covered include measures of central tendency and variability, distributions, the normal distribution, z-scores, hypothesis testing, probability, chi-square tests, t-tests, power, and correlation and regression. [Offered: W]

PSYCH 304 – Thinking and Deciding

Cognitive processes underlying human reasoning, problem solving, judgment, and decision making will be examined. Much of the discussion focuses on current models of these processes, and on the comparison between how rational people (or machines) should ideally behave and how they actually behave in everyday problem solving and decision making.

PSYCH 306 – Perception

What we perceive through our senses makes up much of our conscious experience. This course examines how visual and auditory perception arises and includes topics such as how we become aware of colour, form, space, brightness, loudness, and pitch, and how this information guides behaviour. Other senses may be covered.

PSYCH 307 – Human Neuropsychology

An introduction to current human experimental neuropsychology. The course will review evidence for brain-behaviour interactions obtained from studies of human brain damage and from investigations of the normal brain. Topics such as the representation of language, hemispheric specialization, memory, spatial ability, dyslexia, movement disorders and affective disorders will be considered.

PSYCH 308 – Psychology of Reading

An introduction to the psychology of reading with emphasis on 1) how adult readers recognize words, 2) various accounts of acquired dyslexias consequent to brain damage, 3) computational models of word recognition, and 4) the role of attention and eye movements in reading.

PSYCH 312 – Learning Disabilities

A critical examination of the concept of learning disability and of current issues in the assessment and remediation of learning problems.

PSYCH 312R – Learning Disabilities

A critical examination of the concept of learning disability and of current issues in the assessment and remediation of learning problems.

PSYCH 314 – Cognitive Development

This course introduces research in the areas of debate in cognitive development pertaining to children in infancy and early childhood and drawn from a variety of disciplines including developmental psychology, psycholinguistics, and comparative psychology. Different methodologies and mechanisms of cognitive change are also covered.

PSYCH 315 – Psychology of Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood

A study of the psychological processes in the second and third decades of human development. Consideration is given to such areas as identity formation and intellectual, emotional, and social growth. Current concepts, issues, and research are stressed.

PSYCH 316 – Pragmatic Language Development

This course is an in-depth introduction to pragmatic language development with a focus on children's conversational and narrative ability. Typical and atypical pragmatic language development is examined from a longitudinal, social-cognitive, and multi-cultural perspective and with respect to longer-term outcomes such as social competence, friendship, and success in school.

PSYCH 317 – Child Psychopathology

An examination of children's psychological disorders from several major perspectives with an emphasis on current research findings. Theoretical and clinical issues are considered.

PSYCH 318 – Psychosexual Organization

A detailed examination of concepts related to the formation of gender identity and psychosexual orientation. The nature-nurture debate will be explored as well as gay and lesbian identity and consciousness throughout the life cycle.

PSYCH 319 – Problem Behaviour in the Classroom

This course will address theories related to problem behaviours in the classroom; the incidence and etiology of conduct problems and behavioural disorders; and the learning outcomes of children with such disorders. Special emphasis is given to research and theory related to the promotion of academic success.

PSYCH 320 – Language Development

Examines early language development including how children learn about sounds, words, higher-level sentence structure, and how to communicate effectively. Explores factors within the child and aspects of the environment that make language acquisition possible, as well as special populations of learners who provide additional insight into the acquisition process.

PSYCH 321 – Conceptual Development

Everyday we use concepts that refer to abstract entities like idea, software, number, or DNA. These entities cannot be perceived directly with our bare senses. How then do we acquire concepts for them? Must they be innate? Or do we start off having only perception as babies and then build up concepts through a complex learning process? Do all cultures have these concepts or do they depend on formal education? Must we have language to acquire them? This course provides an overview of both classic and hot-off-the-presses experimental work designed to answer these questions.

PSYCH 322R – Personality Theory

An examination of the major theories of personality including consideration of the psychoanalytic, dispositional, humanistic, and behaviouristic models.

PSYCH 323R – Psychopathology

This course offers an introduction to understanding, assessing, and treating mental illness from a psychological perspective. Course material will focus on various categories of "abnormal" behaviour, including personality, anxiety, and mood disorders, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. Clinical methods of assessment, diagnosis, and intervention will also be considered.

PSYCH 330 – Criminal Profiling

Foundational assumptions for, and basic approaches to, criminal profiling will be considered, along with a survey of relevant techniques in the context of numerous case studies. Limitations and alternatives to profiling will also be addressed.

PSYCH 332 – Human Motivation and Emotion

Classical and contemporary theoretical perspectives of human motivation and emotion will be emphasized. We will draw from animal models and various research methods to examine how our current knowledge in these areas has evolved, and we will explore the applications of these theoretical perspectives to social systems and therapeutic interventions.

PSYCH 334 – Theories of Individual Counselling Psychology

An introduction to the methods, theories and problems in individual Counselling Psychology.

PSYCH 334R – Theories of Individual Counselling Psychology

An introduction to the methods, theories, and problems in individual counselling psychology.

PSYCH 335 – Developmental Neuropsychology

Developmental neuropsychology is a field in which brain-behaviour relationships are examined in the context of typical and atypical development. This course focuses on the structural development of the brain, the emergence of functional brain systems, and the neuropsychological underpinnings of childhood brain disorders such as phenylketonuria, autism, epilepsy, and stroke. Emphasis is placed on the integration of theoretical perspectives and empirical research in neuropsychology with clinical practice.

PSYCH 336 – Introduction to Clinical Psychology

This course is designed to survey major aspects of clinical psychology such as historical background, assessment and intervention models, current trends and future directions in clinical practice.

PSYCH 338 – Organizational Psychology

Survey of organizational, group, and individual processes involved in work motivation, group dynamics, leadership, organizational climate and organizational culture.

PSYCH 339 – Personnel Psychology

The application of psychology to human resource issues in Canadian organizations. Topics will include defining and measuring job performance, job analysis, performance appraisal, recruitment, personnel selection, and training. Procedures which meet technical, professional, and legal standards will be examined.

PSYCH 340 – Training and Development

This course covers systematic approaches and models for training and development; needs assessment; curriculum design; instructional approaches, including use of learning technology; relevant aspects of learning and cognitive theories; and evaluation.

PSYCH 342 – The Psychology of Groups and Teams

The psychology of groups and teams will address psychological processes particular to any social group situation, for example creative design teams, decision making groups, sports teams, group counselling, university clubs, and community groups. Topics include social identification and cohesion, group dynamics (e.g., social loafing, social influence, temporal dynamics, conflict management, etc.), communication in groups, creativity and brainstorming in groups, team leadership, team learning, and measuring team performance. In addition to lectures there will be discussion groups for team experiential exercises.

PSYCH 349R – Cross-Cultural Psychology

This course focuses on human psychology (behaviours, cognition, emotion, motivation, and personality) across cultures, with the aim of raising awareness and understanding of human commonality and diversity. It examines theoretical, methodological, and ethical issues in cross-cultural psychology in light of the current literature.

PSYCH 350 – Political Psychology

What can psychological science contribute to our understanding of political behaviour? To answer this question we will review psychological theory and research on such topics as voter decision-making, political ideologies, issue framing and public opinion, activism in social movements, barriers to conflict resolution, leadership, multiculturalism, political extremism and collective violence.

PSYCH 352 – Culture and Psychology

Special emphasis will be given to questions of how some cultural patterns get established, and how they are maintained once they are established. Topics may include aggression, individualism and collectivism, perspectives on the self, and methodological concerns.

PSYCH 353 – Social Cognition

This course examines how people make sense of their social world: how they perceive, represent, interpret, and remember information about themselves and about other individuals and groups. Topics include representation, recall, and use of social knowledge, controllability of thought processes, effects of feelings and desires, stereotype activation and use, and cultural influences.

PSYCH 354 – Interpersonal Relations

A psychological analysis of social interaction and the dynamics of close relationships.

PSYCH 354R – Interpersonal Relations

A psychological analysis of social interaction and the dynamics of close relationships.

PSYCH 355 – Intergroup Relations

This course reviews social psychological theory and research on intergroup relations: how groups of people and people from different groups interact. It examines stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination (e.g., racism, sexism, ageism, weight, or sexual prejudice) from both majority and minority perspectives. It also discusses implications for promoting intergroup trust, reducing inequality, and resolving real-world conflict.

PSYCH 356 – Personality

This course addresses the science of measuring and explaining patterned individual differences in behaviour, including temperaments and traits; values, goals, and personal strivings; and meaning systems and self-narratives. Topics include behavioural, physiological, genetics, and cultural studies of personality; continuity and change in personality over the lifespan; and personality disorders.

PSYCH 356R – Personality

This course addresses the science of measuring and explaining patterned individual differences in behaviour, including temperaments and traits; values, goals, and personal strivings; and meaning systems and self-narratives. Topics include behavioural, physiological, genetics, and cultural studies of personality; continuity and change in personality over the lifespan; and personality disorders.

PSYCH 357 – Psychology of Good

What does it mean to "be good"? How does one "do good"? What makes "doing good" easier or harder? This course examines (1) the biological and psychosocial foundations of prosocial behaviour and (2) associated facilitators and obstacles at both interpersonal and organizational levels. Topics may include empathy, social responsibility, volunteerism, community intervention, activism, and heroism.

PSYCH 361 – Evolutionary Psychology

The objective of the course is to consider human and animal behaviour from a Darwinian evolutionary perspective. Topics will include habitat selection and predator avoidance, sexual selection and mating systems, social behaviour, aggression, and evolutionary perspectives in perception and cognition.

PSYCH 363 – Special Subjects

These courses will be offered at different times as announced by the Department.

PSYCH 372 – Environmental Psychology

This course is intended to increase the awareness and understanding of the impact of the environment on human behaviour and experience. Topics to be discussed include territoriality and crowding, environment cognition, the psychology of public spaces, the influence of digital and social media on environment perception, and the impact of urban design on mental health. The course will include both lectures and interactive activities.

PSYCH 375R – Studies in Psychology

This course will deal with selected topics in psychology. Subjects will be dependent upon the research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

PSYCH 380 – History of Psychology

This course surveys major developments and personalities in the field of psychology, starting with Wundt's founding of the world's first laboratory for experimental psychology in 1879. By comparing the important movements of structuralism, functionalism, behaviourism and gestaltism, the course evaluates the ideas that continue to provide the basis for modern research and practice in psychology. It will be of interest to those wanting a broader perspective on the field of scientific psychology or the history of science, or those planning a career in psychology.

PSYCH 389 – Social Science Advanced Research Methods Topics

Topics explore social science research methods in Psychology. Consult departmental listings for upcoming topics, which may include naturalistic observation, factorial experiment design, behavioural coding, survey/questionnaire construction, interviewing, and/or linguistic analysis. Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., lab experience, data collection), research reports, critiques of published/proposed research, and student presentations. [Offered: F]

PSYCH 390 – Natural Science Advanced Research Methods Topics

Topics explore natural science research methods in Psychology. Consult departmental listings for upcoming topics, which may include methods for studying psychophysiology, neuroanatomy, and/or cognitive processes (e.g., perception, attention, memory, information-processing, decision-making). Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., lab experience, data collection), research reports, critiques of published/proposed research, and student presentations. [Offered: W and/or S]

PSYCH 391 – Advanced Data Analysis

Aimed at developing an understanding of the use and interpretation of statistics in complex research designs, this course emphasizes analysis of variance and multiple comparison techniques to interpret the results of multi-factor experiments. The importance of power in factorial designs is discussed. The course includes a computer component that ties the use of a statistical package to the topics discussed in lectures. [Offered: F, W]

PSYCH 392 – Research in Human Cognitive Neuroscience

Students learn how to measure psychophysiological responses to the stimuli in our world (e.g., familiar faces, emotional scenes, video games, etc.). Students get hands-on training in acquiring and analyzing different types of psychophysiological data such as skin conductance responses and heart rate changes over short and long periods. [Offered: W and/or S]

PSYCH 393 – Research in Developmental Psychology

Current research methods and procedures employed in developmental research are covered. Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., 'hands on' lab experience and data collection), research reports, critiques of published and proposed research, individual and/or group presentations. [Offered F]

PSYCH 394 – Research in Cognition and Perception

Current topics in the study of cognitive and perceptual processes including research methods and procedures are covered. Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., 'hands on' lab experience and data collection), research reports, critiques of published and proposed research, individual and/or group presentations. [Offered: W and/or S]

PSYCH 395 – Research in Social Psychology

Current research methods and procedures employed in social psychology research are covered. Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., 'hands on' lab experience and data collection), research reports, critiques of published and proposed research, individual and/or group presentations. [Offered F]

PSYCH 396 – Research in Behavioural Neuroscience

Students learn about research in behavioural neuroscience in a hands-on, laboratory atmosphere with an emphasis on comparative and evolutionary approaches to understanding brain-behaviour relations. Projects include neuroanatomical methods and observation of behaviour using a variety of analytic methods. [Offered: W and/or S]

PSYCH 397 – Research in Personality and Clinical Psychology

Current research methods and procedures employed in personality and/or clinical psychology research are covered. Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., 'hands on' lab experience and data collection), research reports, critiques of published and proposed research, individual and/or group presentations. [Offered F]

PSYCH 398 – Research in Memory

Current topics in the study of memory including research methods and procedures are covered. Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., 'hands on' lab experience and data collection), research reports, critiques of published and proposed research, individual and/or group presentations. [Offered: W and/or S]

PSYCH 398R – Independent Study

An independent in-depth study of a selected area of concern to the student within the discipline of psychology. Available to individuals or small groups of third- or fourth-year Social Development Studies majors and arranged with one of the faculty members from the program.

PSYCH 399 – Research in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Current research methods and procedures employed in industrial/organizational psychology are covered. Activities may include research proposals, group and/or individual projects (e.g., 'hands on' lab experience and data collection), research reports, critiques of published and proposed research, individual and/or group presentations. [Offered F]

PSYCH 399R – Independent Study

An independent in-depth study of a selected area of concern to the student within the discipline of psychology. Available to individuals or small groups of third- or fourth-year Social Development Studies majors and arranged with one of the faculty members from the program.

PSYCH 420 – An Introduction to Computational Neuroscience Methods

This course gives students with either a limited computational or psychology background a gentle introduction to computational neuroscience. The course involves a series of lectures and computational exercises and concludes with an in-class presentation. Programming exercises can be completed with either Excel or a computer language of the student's choice.

PSYCH 439 – Negotiation in the Workplace: Theory and Practice

This course addresses planning, motivation, communication, information exchange, influence, relationships, emotion, and reaching objectives in a diverse array of interdependent decision making contexts. Topics include distributive and integrative negotiations, coalitions, negotiating on teams, dispute resolution, and multi-party negotiations. Course format is experiential learning and attendance is required.

PSYCH 444R – Psychological Interventions

This course reviews research showing how brief, non-invasive, low-cost, social psychological treatments can have small but significant benefits months and years later. Topics include school-based interventions, health interventions, psychological well-being interventions, prejudice-reduction interventions, when and why interventions can fail, and the theories behind how interventions work.

PSYCH 447 – Seminar in Cognitive Science

An interdisciplinary discussion of central issues concerned with mind and intelligence, such as representation, meaning, inference and consciousness.

PSYCH 448R – Close Relationships

This course focuses on the life cycle of close adult relationships, ranging from the stages of initial attraction and development of an attachment, to growth and maintenance of the relationship, to conflict and dissolution. Seminars discuss contemporary theory and research with an emphasis on understanding the basic processes involved in intimate relationships.

PSYCH 449R – Race and Gender Equality

This course examines stereotypes and prejudices from a social psychological perspective, focusing on understanding and applying the research in schools, the workplace, and the home. Topics include overt and subtle prejudice, situational barriers to stigmatized groups' success, and interventions that promote equality by reducing prejudice and its negative effects.

PSYCH 450R – Senior Seminar in Special Topics

Senior seminars may include weekly readings, individual and/or group projects, class presentations and discussions, research proposals, essays/literature reviews, assignments, midterms, and final exams. Consult departmental listings for topics and prerequisites for the current year.

PSYCH 451 – Honours Seminar - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

This seminar addresses issues in child/adolescent psychopathology such as mood/anxiety disorders, conduct disorder, psychosis, eating disorders, Tourette's Syndrome, and severe behavioural problems. Emphasis is on theories and research concerning social-emotional functioning, diagnosis, therapy, and socio-cultural contexts. The course also considers challenges and barriers encountered when raising and teaching children/adolescents with a mental illness.

PSYCH 453 – Honours Seminar in Developmental Psychology

Topics reflect current issues in developmental psychology. Consult the departmental listings for the upcoming topics. Activities may include oral presentations, class discussions, individual and/or group projects, and written assignments.

PSYCH 454 – Honours Seminar in Educational Psychology

Topics reflect current issues in educational psychology. Consult the departmental listings for the upcoming topics. Activities may include oral presentations, class discussions, individual and/or group projects, and written assignments.

PSYCH 455 – Honours Seminar in Social Psychology

Topics reflect current issues in social psychology. Consult the departmental listings for the upcoming topics. Activities may include oral presentations, class discussions, individual and/or group projects, and written assignments.

PSYCH 457 – Honours Seminar in Personality and Clinical Psychology

Topics reflect current issues in personality and clinical psychology. Consult the departmental listings for the upcoming topics. Activities may include oral presentations, class discussions, individual and/or group projects, and written assignments.

PSYCH 458 – Honours Seminar in Cognition

Topics reflect current issues in cognitive psychology. Consult the departmental listings for the upcoming topics. Activities may include oral presentations, class discussions, individual and/or group projects, and written assignments.

PSYCH 459 – Honours Seminar - Close Relationships

This course covers social psychological theories of close relationships with emphasis on reading and discussion of original empirical articles. Topics may include attraction, partner selection, trust and power, attachment, communications, conflict, intimacy, and relationship maintenance and dissolution. Student roles include presenting articles, leading discussions, and submitting a written research proposal.

PSYCH 461 – Honours Seminar in Cognitive Neuroscience

Topics reflect the research interests of faculty members, for example, cognitive neuropsychology, visual neuroscience, and hemispheric specialization. Consult the departmental listings for the upcoming topics. Activities may include oral presentations, class discussions, individual and/or group projects, and written assignments.

PSYCH 462 – Honours Seminar in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Consult the departmental listings for the upcoming topics. Content may involve personnel (e.g., employee selection and appraisal) and/or organizational topics (groups/teams, justice, leadership, motivation, organizational culture or organizational change). Activities may include oral presentations, class discussions, individual and/or group projects, and written assignments.

PSYCH 463 – Honours Seminar in Special Topics

Honours seminars may include weekly readings, individual and/or group projects, class discussions, research proposals, one or two essays/literature reviews, weekly assignments, one or two midterms, and final exams. Consult departmental listings for topics and topic-specific prerequisites for the current year.

PSYCH 464 – Advanced Research Apprenticeship

This course involves an unpaid apprenticeship of 96 hours in a faculty member's research lab in the Department of Psychology. Apprenticeship hours will be completed before the end of the lecture period for the term of enrolment. Students will be assigned duties that will enable them to advance their understanding of the research process. Course application forms are available on the Psychology undergraduate website. Grading is on a credit/no credit basis. Paid or volunteer positions that are obtained outside the context of this course are not eligible for credit in this course. [Offered: F,W,S]

PSYCH 465 – Applied Apprenticeship

For Psychology majors interested in a career in applied psychology. The course involves an unpaid apprenticeship in an industrial, medical, government, or other applied setting combined with regular seminar meetings. The apprenticeship will require a volunteer commitment of 60 hours during the lecture period. The course is offered on a credit/no credit basis. Paid or volunteer positions that are obtained outside the context of this course are not eligible for credit in this course. Course application forms are available at the Psychology undergraduate website. [Offered: W]

PSYCH 466 – Emergent Literacy

Emergent literacy refers to the knowledge and skills children acquire from birth on through the preschool years that are important to the development of literacy (reading and writing). Students will learn about emergent literacy via a once-weekly seminar component and a once-weekly unpaid practicum placement at a local elementary public school where students will have the opportunity to read one-on-one with children who are at the beginning stages of reading. The practicum component will involve a commitment of up to 30 hours during the formal lecture period. Students wishing to enter the course must obtain a police check prior to the second week of classes. Transportation to the apprenticeship/volunteer setting is the student's responsibility. Please review the course application form for information on safety for students on unpaid work placement and insurance responsibilities. Course application forms and further details are available on the Psychology undergraduate website. Paid or volunteer positions that are obtained outside the context of this course are not eligible for credit in this course.

PSYCH 467 – Human Resources Apprenticeship

For Psychology majors and Human Resources Management students interested in a career in Human Resources. The course involves an unpaid apprenticeship in a human resources setting combined with regular seminar meetings. The apprenticeship will require a volunteer commitment of 60 hours during the lecture period. The course is offered on a credit/no credit basis. Paid or volunteer positions that are obtained outside the context of this course are not eligible for credit in this course. Course application forms are available at the Psychology undergraduate website. [Offered: W]

PSYCH 470 – Special Topics in Applied Psychology

Topics cover practical applications of theory and research in one or more of the six areas of psychology. Consult departmental listings for upcoming topics. Topics may include applications of psychology to health, well-being, law, education, policy analysis, management, marketing, regulation, systems design, community organizing, conflict resolution, and/or communications.

PSYCH 480 – Directed Studies - Elective

The student will conduct an extensive literature review and write a major essay/critique of the literature under the supervision of a faculty member selected by the student. The course application form must include a detailed course plan including the method of evaluation.

PSYCH 481 – Directed Studies - Natural Science Advanced Psych

The student will conduct an extensive literature review under the supervision of a faculty member. Course requirements will include writing a major essay/critique of a topic in a natural science area of psychology. The course application form must include a detailed course plan including the method of evaluation.

PSYCH 482 – Directed Studies - Social Science Advanced Psych

The student will conduct an extensive literature review under the supervision of a faculty member. Course requirements will include writing a major essay/critique of a topic in a social science area of psychology. The course application form must include a detailed course plan including the method of evaluation.

PSYCH 483 – Directed Studies - Natural Science Research

The student conducts an empirical research project in a natural science area of psychology under the supervision of a faculty member. Course requirements include writing a report of the research carried out. The course application form must include a detailed course plan including the method of evaluation.

PSYCH 484 – Directed Studies - Social Science Research

The student conducts a research project in a social science area of psychology under the supervision of a faculty member. Course requirements include writing a report of the research carried out. The course application form must include a detailed course plan including the method of evaluation.

PSYCH 485 – Directed Studies - Seminar

The student conducts an extensive literature review under the supervision of a faculty member. Course requirements include writing a major essay/critique of the literature, and doing an oral presentation. The course application form must include a detailed course plan including the method of evaluation.

PSYCH 486 – Directed Studies - Advanced Statistics

The student conducts an extensive study of advanced statistical techniques under the supervision of a faculty member. Course requirements normally include assessment of competency through examination. The course application form must include a detailed course plan including the method of evaluation.

PSYCH 490R – Special Studies

An independent, in-depth study, based on empirical research and/or extensive reading in psychology under the direction of individual instructors in psychology at Renison University College. Available to individuals or small groups of fourth-year Social Development Studies majors and arranged with one of the faculty members from the plan. The project must be approved by the academic supervisor of the course prior to registration.

PSYCH 492 – Psychological Measurement: Foundations of Research and Practice

Students learn how to develop reliable and valid measures of psychological constructs (e.g., self-esteem, mind wandering), and study and apply advanced analytic procedures (e.g., regression, factor analysis). This course is foundational for graduate studies in all six areas of psychology, and for applied jobs in business, clinical, and educational settings.

PSYCH 493 – Data Analysis and Graphing in R

The course aims to make students effective, autonomous users of R, a statistics software program with graphical applications and utility in many careers. Students learn to code syntax, analyze, and graph data using R. Each student conducts an R-based data analysis project of particular interest to them.

PSYCH 499A – Honours Thesis - Part 1

Under supervision of a faculty member students normally will review literature, design a study, present an oral research proposal, collect data, and write a scholarly report of the project. Students may choose to begin PSYCH 499 in their 3B or 4A term.

PSYCH 499B – Honours Thesis - Part 2

Continuation of PSYCH 499A

PSYCH 499C – Honours Thesis - Part 3

Continuation of PSYCH 499A/B.

PSYCH 605 – Special Topics in Clinical Psychology

Some examples of seminars offered recently: biological foundations of psychopathology, death, therapeutic use of hypnosis, clinical disorders.

PSYCH 607P – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

This is an advanced skills-based course designed to provide students with a solid understanding of cognitive-behavioural theory and basic skills in applying theory to treatment of anxiety and mood disorders in adults. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 607R – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 607P. Students will see one adult patient with a mood or anxiety disorder for a total of 16 sessions of cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group to discuss their cases every two weeks. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 607S – Efficacy and Program Evaluation

This is an advanced applied research course designed to provide students with skills for conducting research in applied settings. Most non-academic clinical psychologists work in a hospital setting for a least part of their career, where they will be responsible for clinical service delivery and also to conduct reserach and program evaluation. This course reviews relevant research designs and advanced data analytic strategies for research in such settings. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608A – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy

This course is designed to familiarize clinical students with a range of child psychotherapy modalities, such as behavioural and cognitive therapies, parental guidance, family and narrative therapies, and play therapy. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608B – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608C – Child Psychopathology and Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608B. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608D – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH h 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608C. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608E – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608D. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608F – Child Psychopathology & PsychotherapyPracticum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608E. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608G – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608F. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608H – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608G. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608I – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608H. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608J – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608I. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608K – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608J. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 608L – Child Psychopathology & Psychotherapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 608A. This practicum follows PSYCH 608K. Students will see child clients with an externalizing or internalizing disorder for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 609 – Practicum in Supervision

The students in the course will serve as the primary supervisor for a case being seen by a junior (3rd year) therapist. Course content will follow Haynes, Corey, & Moulton (2003) "Clincal supervision in the helping professions: A practical guide." Class will meet weekly to discuss the assigned reading and to discuss the cases the students are supervising. The course instructor will also be following the supervised cases of the 3rd year students, although most of this will be left to the senior trainee. Clinical students will be required to take it in their fourth or fifth year. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 609A – Practicum in Supervision

The students in the course will serve as the primary supervisor for a case being seen by a junior (3rd year) therapist. Class will meet weekly to discuss assigned readings and to discuss the cases the students are supervising. The course instructor will also be following the supervised cases of the third-year students, although most of this will be left to the senior trainee. Clinical students will be required to take the course in their fourth or fifth year. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 609B – Practicum in Supervision

The students in the course will serve as the primary supervisor for a case being seen by a junior (3rd year) therapist. Class will meet weekly to discuss assigned readings and to discuss the cases the students are supervising. The course instructor will also be following the supervised cases of the third year students, although most of this will be left to the senior trainee. Clinical students will be required to take the course in their fourth or fifth year. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 609C – Practicum in Supervision

The students in the course will serve as the primary supervisor for a case being seen by a junior (third-year) therapist. Class will meet weekly to discuss assigned readings and to discuss the cases the students are supervising. The course instructor will also be following the supervised cases of the third-year students, although most of this will be left to the senior trainee. Clinical students will be required to take the course in their fourth or fifth year. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 610A – Practicum in Integrated Assessment 1

This course provides a continuation of practicum training in the integrated assessment of children, adolescents, and adults. This course extends the experiences provided through Psych 618 and Psych 619 "Practicum in Interviewing & Cognitive Assessment" by increasing student responsibility for integration of assessment information, case conceptualization, report preparation and feedback, consultation, and supervision of junior students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 610B – Practicum in Integrated Assessment 2

This course provides a continuation of practicum training in the integrated assessment of children, adolescents, and adults. This course extends the experiences provided through Psych 618 and Psych 619 "Practicum in Interviewing and Cognitive Assessment" by increasing student responsibility for integration of assessment information, case conceptualization, report preparation and feedback, consultation,and supervision of junior students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 611 – Ethics Diversity, & Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology

This course reviews existing standards and ethical guidelines for clinical practice and research and serves as an introductory roadmap for building cultural competence in clinical psychology. Students will be introduced to legislations that affect applied psychology and we will review ethical issues in research and clinical practice.

PSYCH 612A – Private Practice Placement

This practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a private practice setting in the community. Students in the fifth or successive year of the program may petition the clinical program director to enrol in this four-month block placement in a private practice setting. The students will meet with their supervisors to agree on a set of educational goals for their practicum experience to be evaluated at the conclusion of the term. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only senior students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 612B – Private Practice Placement

This practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a private practice setting in the community. Students in the fifth or successive year of the program may petition the clinical program director to enrol in this four-month block placement in a private practice setting. The students will meet with their supervisors to sagree on a set of educational goals for their practicum experience to be evaluated at the conclusion of the term. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only senior students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 612C – Private Practice Placement

This practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a private practice setting in the community. Students in the fifth or successive year of the program may petition the clinical program director to enrol in this four-month block placement in a private practice setting. The students will meet with their supervisors to agree on a set of educational goals for their practicum experience to be evaluated at the conclusion of the term. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only senior students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 613A – Senior Practicum

This practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). Students in the fifth or successive year of the program may petition the clinical program director to enrol in this four-month block placement in the CMHR. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only senior students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 613B – Senior Practicum

This practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). Students in the fifth or successive year of the program may petition the clinical program director to enrol in this four-month block placement in the CMHR. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only senior students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 613C – Senior Practicum

This practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). Students in the fifth or successive year of the program may petition the clinical program director to enrol in this four-month block placement in the CMHR. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only senior students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 614A – Theory and Application in Couples' Therapy

This course is designed to familiarize students with the theories and associated techniques of couples' therapy and to provide an overview of basic and applied research in the study of intimate relationships. A range of therapeutic perspectives will be surveyed but particular emphasis will be given to the cognitive-behavioural perspective. The first section of the course will focus on assessment and treatment of relationship distress; the second section will cover basic research on cognition, affect and behaviour in material/dyadic relationships; the final section will cover specialized topics in couples' therapy such as multicultural relationships, same gender relationship, domestic violence, infidelity, and individual psychopathology. In addition to learning the theoretical and empirical basis of marital/couples' therapy, the course will prepare students to work with couples in distress. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 614B – Practicum in Couples' Therapy

This course is a practicum course associated with Psych 614A "Theory and Application in Couples' Therapy". The practicum experience will involve closely supervised assessment and intervention with couples relationship distress. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 614C – Practicum in Couples' Therapy

This course is a practicum course associated with Psych 614A "Theory and Application in Couples' Therapy". This second practicum experience will involve closely supervisoed assessment and intervention with couples relationship distress. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615A – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

This is an advanced skills-based course designed to provide students with a solid understanding of cognitive-behavioural theory and basic skills in applying theory to treatment of anxiety and mood disorders in adults. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615B – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615C – Cognitivie Behaviour Theraphy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615B. Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615D – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615C. Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615E – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615D. Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615F – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615E. Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615G – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615F Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615H – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615G Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615I – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615H Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 615J – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practicum

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice the skills they learn in PSYCH 615A. This practicum follows PSYCH 615I Students will see adult clients for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet as a group less frequently to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 616 – Clinical Research Forum

This course provides a forum in which general topics of research methodology and content are to be discussed. The course is required of all first year students and attendance of all senior students and faculty is anticipated. The course is intended to provide a forum for discussion of general research ideas, for presentation of specific proposals, for the report of completed MA research projects and for discussion of specific problems and advances in statistical and design techniques pertinent to clinical research.

PSYCH 617 – Cross-Cultural Issues in Clinical Psychology

This course explores issues of culture and diversity in the theory and practice of clinical psychology. Required of all 4th year clinical students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 618 – Practicum in Interviewing & Cognitive Assessment I

This practicum develops basic clinical skills in interviewing, the administration and scoring of intelligence tests and other cognitive assessment techniques, the integration and interpretation of test information, and report-writing and client-feed-back skills, Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 619 – Practicum in Interviewing & Cognitive Assessment II

This practicum develops basic clinical skills in interviewing, the administration and scoring of intelligence tests and other cognitive assessment techniques, the integration and interpretation of test information, and report-writing and client-feedback skills. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 620 – Diagnostic Assessment Practicum

This course is a weekly practicum during which students are exposed to diagnostic assessment, decision making, and practice. This course includes didactic learning, reading, case conferencing and supervised practice. Students will develop a diagnostic knowledge base that includes the DSM diagnostic categories and differential diagnoses, as well as diagnostic mindset about how to approach diagnostic interviewing. Students will be trained under supervision to screen for, identify, and develop working hypotheses about differential diagnoses. They will also begin developing proficiency in communicating diagnostic impressions to both colleagues (via participation in weekly intake meeting and the preparation of diagnostic summary sheets/reports) as well as clients (via observation of/participation in diagnostic feedback sessions). Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 620A – Diagnostic Assessment Practicum

This course is a weekly practicum during which students are exposed to diagnostic assessment, decision making, and practice. This course includes didactic learning, reading, case conferencing and supervised practice. Students will develop a diagnostic knowledge base that includes the DSM diagnostic categories and differential diagnoses, as well as diagnostic mindset about how to approach diagnostic interviewing. Students will be trained under supervision to screen for, identify, and develop working hypotheses about differential diagnoses. They will also begin developing proficiency in communicating diagnostic impressions to both colleagues (via participation in weekly intake meeting and the preparation of diagnostic summary sheets/reports) as well as clients (via observation of/participation in diagnostic feedback sessions). Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Taught in the Fall term.

PSYCH 620B – Diagnostic Assessment Practicum

This course is a weekly practicum during which students are exposed to diagnostic assessment, decision making, and practice. This course includes didactic learning, reading, case conferencing and supervised practice. Students will develop a diagnostic knowledge base that includes the DSM diagnostic categories and differential diagnoses, as well as diagnostic mindset about how to approach diagnostic interviewing. Students will be trained under supervision to screen for, identify, and develop working hypotheses about differential diagnoses. They will also begin developing proficiency in communicating diagnostic impressions to both colleagues (via participation in weekly intake meeting and the preparation of diagnostic summary sheets/reports) as well as clients (via observation of/participation in diagnostic feedback sessions). Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Taught in the Fall term.

PSYCH 621 – Advanced Clinical Research

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this clinical research topics seminar that will meet weekly and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analysis applicable to lab and clinical settings.

PSYCH 621A – Advanced Clinical Research Forum I

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 621 - Required of all 1st year Clinical students.

PSYCH 621B – Advanced Clinical Research Forum I

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 621 - Required of all 1st year Clinical students.

PSYCH 622A – Advanced Clnical Research Forum II

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 622 - Required of all 2nd year Clinical students.

PSYCH 622B – Advanced Clinical Research Forum II

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 622 - Required of all 2nd year Clinical students.

PSYCH 623A – Advanced Clinical Research Forum III

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 623 - Required of all 3rd year Clinical students.

PSYCH 623B – Advanced Clinical Research Forum III

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 623 - Required of all 3rd year Clinical students.

PSYCH 624A – Advanced Clinical Research Forum IV

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 624 - Required of all 4th year Clinical students.

PSYCH 624B – Advanced Clinical Research Forum IV

Clinical students in all of the first four years of the graduate program are expected to enroll in this two-term advanced clinical research topics seminar that will meet twice a month and continue throughout the fall and winter terms to discuss new and ongoing clinical research topics conducted by the students and faculty in the program. Topics will include research into personality study, psychopathology, various assessment and therapeutic efforts in clinical psychology. Special emphasis will be placed on research design and statistical analyses applicable to lab and clinical settings. Note: 624 - Required of all 4th year Clinical students.

PSYCH 625A – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

The emphasis of the course is on understanding psychodynamic, humanistic, and interpersonal theory and applications to psychotherapy. The course will be a balance between lectures, reading, and experiential learning through case conceptualization and treatment planning from each of the covered perspectives. Only students in the Clinical Psycholgosy program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625B – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. Students will see one adult client for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625C – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. This practicum follows PSYCH 625B. Students will see adult clients for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625D – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. This practicum follows PSYCH 625C. Students will see adult clients for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625E – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. This practicum follows PSYCH 625D. Students will see adult clients for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625F – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. This practicum follows PSYCH 625E. Students will see adult clients for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625G – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. This practicum follows PSYCH 625F. Students will see adult clients for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625H – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. This practicum follows PSYCH 625G. Students will see adult clients for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 625I – Traditional and Contemporary Psychotherapies

This is a practicum course designed to give students the opportunity to practice skills they learn in PSYCH 625A. This practicum follows PSYCH 625H. Students will see adult clients for therapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week and will meet less frequently as a group to discuss their cases. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 626A – Psychotherapy Practicum I

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy to the students enrolled in the third year of the clinical training program. The supervision is conducted in small groups and individually; theoretical and practical issues are discussed in special seminars. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 626B – Psychotherapy Practicum I

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy to the students enrolled in the third year of the clinical training program. The supervision is conducted in small groups and individually; theoretical and practical issues are discussed in special seminars. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only student in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 626C – Psychotherapy Practicum I

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy to the students enrolled in the third year of the clinical training program. The supervision is conducted in small groups and individually; theoretical and practical issues are discussed in special seminars. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 627A – Psychotheraphy Practicum II

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy for students enrolled in the fourth year of the clinical training program. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 627B – Psychotheraphy Practicum II

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy for students enrolled in the fourth year of the clinical training program. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 627C – Psychotherapy Practicum II

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy for students enrolled in the fourth year of the clinical training program. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 628A – Psychotherapy Practicum III

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy for students enrolled in therapy who are continuing their training on campus during their fifth year, prior to a full-year off-campus internship. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 628B – Psychotherapy Practicum III

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy for students enrolled in therapy who are continuing their training on campus during their fifth year, prior to a full-year off-campus internship. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 628C – Psychotherapy Practicum III

This course offers supervised psychotherapy training in one-to-one therapy for students enrolled in therapy who are continuing their training on campus during their fifth year, prior to a full-year off-campus internship. Ordinarily students will enrol in all three terms because psychotherapy practice requires year-round service. If, however, a student's work demands a placement off-campus or otherwise requires a full commitment to other activities, the third (spring) term may be omitted. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 629 – Psychopathology across the Lifespan

This course is designed to familiarize students with the major forms of psychopathology as they occur across the lifespan (in children, adolescents, and adults). Basic diagnostic information, including clinical presentation and course, as well as theories about the etiology of disorders are covered.

PSYCH 630 – Advanced Analysis of Variance

The purpose of this course is to review contemporary perspectives on assumptions, procedures, and implications of analysis of variance. The course follows a model testing approach in which parameters for full and restricted models are predicted, and the adequacy of the models compared. Concepts such as power, effect size, error rates, contrasts, trend analyses, nonorthogonality, and so forth are discussed for higher-order, between and within -subjects designs. Special attention is given to analyses with multiple dependent variables (MANOVA). Finally, the application of randomization tests is presented as an alternative to theoretical distributions of test statistics, and the relationships of ANOVA and multiple regression techniques are also examined for simple and complex designs.

PSYCH 632 – Multiple Regression

Basic principles used in the design of experiments and the analysis of experimental data, with emphasis on multiple regression and complex analysis of variance techniques.

PSYCH 633 – Observation, Interviewing and Cognitive Assessment

Instruction and supervision in the use of standard IQ tests and report writing is emphasized. The course also covers the assessment of brain damage, and basic interviewing procedures. This course is a requirement for all first year clinical graduate students. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 633A – Observation, Interviewing and Cognitive Assessment

This full-year (fall and winter terms) course covers topics such as systems of clinical interviewing and observation, psychometric construction and use of self-report inventories and ability tests, principles of test interpretation and report writing, theories and measurement of intelligence, the conceptualizaiton and assessment of learning disabilities and other academic problems, and basic neuropsychology, as they apply to the clinical asessement of both children and adults. This course is a requirement for all first-year clinical graduate students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 633B – Observation, Interviewing and Cognitive Assessment

This full-year (fall and winter terms) course covers topics such as systems of clinical interviewing and observation, psychometric construction and use of self-report inventories and ability tests, principles of test interpretation and report writing, theories and measurement of intelligence, the conceptualizaiton and assessment of learning disabilities and other academic problems, and basic neuropsychology, as they apply to the clinical asessement of both children and adults. This course is a requirement for all first-year clinical graduate students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 634 – Laboratory Research in Clinical Psychology

First year clinical students are expected to formulate a research goal and a proposal for a thesis project. This course is mandatory during the summer concluding the first academic year (term three of the program). Although established as a reading course, students are expected to learn laboratory routines and conduct pilot investigations using the research technology appropriate to their thesis plans. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 635 – Clinical Fieldwork Placement I

This practicum offers training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. All clinical students are obliged to enrol for this course in the summer following their second academic year of the program. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 635A – Clinical Fieldwork Placement I

This Fall practicum offers training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Clinical students can enrol in this course in the fall following their first academic year of the program. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 635B – Clinical Fieldwork Placement I

This Winter practicum offers training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Clinical students can enrol in this course in the winter following their first academic year of the program. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 635C – Clinical Fieldwork Placement I

This Spring practicum offers training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. All clinical students are required to enrol for this course in the spring following their first academic year of the program. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 636 – Clinical Fieldwork Placement II

This practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program may petition the clinical program director to enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. If the student envisions a career in a service setting and has shown adequate progress in meeting research goals, this course may be taken as an elective. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 636A – Clinical Fieldwork Placement II

This fall practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. Graded on a CN/NCR basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 636B – Clin Fieldwork Placement II

This winter practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. Graded on a CN/NCR basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 636C – Clinical Fieldwork Placement II

This spring practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. Graded on a CN/NCR basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 637 – SCID-I Administration

This lab is open to clinical students only and is designed to teach students how to administer the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I). Each section of the SCID-I will be reviewed thoroughly, with in-class demonstrations and role plays used to practice each module. Students administer the complete interview twice in order to receive detailed feedback on their administration and are evaluated on the final administration to fulfill the course requirement. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 637A – Clinical Fieldwork Placement III

This fall practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program enrol in this third four-month block placement in a community agency. Graded on a CR/NCR basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 637B – Clinical Fieldwork Placement III

This winter practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program enrol in this third four-month block placement in a community agency. Graded on a CR/NCR basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 637C – Clinical Fieldwork Placement III

This spring practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program enrol in this third four-month block placement in a community agency. Graded on a CR/NCR basis. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 638 – Personality

This course pro ides a survey of current theories of personality and a review of recent developments in personality research. Current and emerging assessment methodologies will also be considered. Only students in the clinical psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 638B – Measurement and Test Theory

This course covers measurement theory, test construction, the psychometric evaluation of tests, and principles of score interpretation. The course fills two needs: (1) for future practitioners it provides a background in psychometric methods essential for the appropriate use of psychological tests and measures in clinical settings; and (2) for researchers it develops the theme that research design and data analysis should take explicit account of measurement issues. Students gain experience with a variety of statistical methods, including the calculation of appropriate reliability coefficients, methods of item analysis, use of Bayes' Theorem, factor analysis, and structural equation modeling. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 639 – Psychopathology in Childhood and Adolescence

This course provides greater detail on psychopathology and treatment of chilhood psychopahtology, and when taken in conjunction with PSYCH 629 - Adult Psychopathology - provides an overview of psychopathology across the lifespan. The College of Psychologists of Ontario requires students to have this training and detailed description to register for their license when they complete their degree requirements.

PSYCH 640 – Special Topics in Psychology

PSYCH 645 – Structure and Function in the Developing Brain

This course will examine the development of brain-behaviour relationships between pre-infancy and adulthood from converging behavioural, neurophsiological, and neuroimaging perspectives. Topics will include structural brain development, the emergence and refinement of functional brain systems, sequelae of early brain insult, and the role of pasticity in recovery and 'neuroenhancement'. This course is not recommended for students outside of the areas of Psychology, Health Studies and Gerontology, and Kinesiology.

PSYCH 650 – Special Topics in Cognition and Perception

PSYCH 670 – Special Topics in Behavioural Neuroscience

PSYCH 677A – Fundamentals of Behavioural Neuroscience

This survey course will be team-taught by members of the collaborative program, and will serve to introduce students to major subareas of ongoing behavioural neuroscience research at Waterloo. Topics will include cognitive psychopathology, apraxia, topics in visual neuroscience, early experience and brain development, cognitive electrophysiology, human locomotion, neuropathology of schizophrenia, object recognition, hemispheric specialization, motor control and psychoneuroimmunology.

PSYCH 680 – Special Topics in Child Behaviour and Development

PSYCH 690 – Special Topics in Social and Personality

PSYCH 701 – Foundations in Cognitive/Social Development: Basic

This course will introduce students to classic and contemporary perspectives and research in basic cognitive development. The instructor may cover a range of topics and perspectives, such as: core knowledge/cognition; domain-general accounts of knowledge acquisition; methodology in infant/child cognition.

PSYCH 702 – Foundations in Cognitive/Social Development: Social Cognitive Development

This course will introduce students to classic and contemporary perspectives in research in social development. The instructor may cover a range of topics and perspectives in social development or social cognition.

PSYCH 703 – Language Development

Examines the acquisition by children of a first language. Issues to be considered include the following: (1) the cognitive prerequisites for language learning; (2) the acquisition of phonology, semantics syntax and pragmatics; (3) the implications of semantic and grammatical development for cognitive development; (4) the question of whether language eventually mediates thought and problem solving; (5) metalinguistic awareness. Research and theory germane to these and related issues will be considered.

PSYCH 704A – Social Psychology

Seminars dealing with theoretical issues and research findings in the area of social psychology.

PSYCH 704B – Social Psychology

Seminars dealing with theoretical issues and research findings in the area of social psychology.

PSYCH 705 – Foundations in Language Development: Basic Language Development

This course will introduce students to the basics of language and to classic and contemporary perspectives and research in language development. The instructor may cover a range of topics and perspectives, including: nativist vs. empiricist approaches to language development; methodology for the study of infant/child language development; early phonological, lexical, and grammatical development; language processing.

PSYCH 706 – Foundations in Language Development: Pragmatics of Language

This course will introduce students to classic and contemporary perspectives related to pragmatic language development in both early and later childhood. This course will focus on aspects of language development that take into account multiple interactants (family, pets, teachers) and settings outside the home. This course will also consider language development from a broader social and multicultural perspective.

PSYCH 707 – Cognitive Neuroscience Seminar

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group.

PSYCH 707A – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar I

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. All first-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 707B – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar I

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA and PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. All first-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 708 – Reasoning about Ownership of Property

Ownership of property is an important determinant of human behaviour. It is especially important in development because most of young children's social conflicts concern the possession and use of objects and these conflicts often involve reasoning about ownership. This class will examine the development of reasoning about ownership. Although the main approach will be developmental, a multidisciplinary approach will be taken. Readings will include papers from other areas of psychology and from philosophy, anthropology, law, and ethology.

PSYCH 709 – Reasoning about Beliefs and Desires

The ability to reason about what others think (believe) and want (desire) is crucial to social interaction, and when making sense of what we and others do. For example, in explaining why someone goes to a certain store we might say the she DESIRES to buy a hammer, and BELIEVES the store sells them. The ability to reason about beliefs, desires, and other mental states is often called "theory of mind." How this ability develops in childhood, has been greatly debated over the past 20 years, and remains mysterious (e.g. how can we learn that people have mental states when we cannot see mental states, but only infer them by observing people's behaviour). This course will mainly concern the development of theory of mind in childhood, and we will discuss the major empirical discoveries and theoretical positions in this area of investigation.

PSYCH 710 – Current Issues in Developmental Psych Seminar

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research members of the group.

PSYCH 711 – Seminar In Personality

Systematic review of personality theories and related research.

PSYCH 712 – Social Development

The course will cover a number of currently active areas of research in early social development in some depth. The treatment of the various topics will emphasize methodological as well as substantive issues.

PSYCH 713 – Theories of Pretence

From early in development (18 months, if not earlier) children engage in and recognize pretence. For example, children can pretend that a banana is a telephone, that their juice is in an empty cup, or that a clean teddybear is dirty. Although pretence is often taken for granted, and perhaps considered childish, it is mysterious: How do children pretend, and purposely represent the world as different than it really is? And how are children able to recognize what others pretend? Are children behaviourists about pretend play? Or does successful pretence signal that your children engage in mental state reasoning ('theory of mind')? Theories of children's (and adults') pretence have sought to provide answers to the questions. These theories are still actively debated, and are the main topic of this course. Relevant experimental work will also be discussed.

PSYCH 714 – Current Topics in Social Psych Seminar

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group.

PSYCH 714A – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar II

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA and PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. All second-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 714B – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar II

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA and PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. All second-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 716 – Adult Psychopathology

This course will deepen students' understanding of important concepts, theory, and research in adult psychopathology. Students will familiarize themselves with basic diagnostic information for the major mental disorders, including clinical presentation and course. They will also learn to explain, evaluate, and apply a range of empirical and theoretical perspectives on the etiology and maintenance of mental disorders.

PSYCH 717 – Psychological Assessment I

This course, together with PSYCH 718, covers topics such as systems of clinical interviewing and observation, clinical use of self-report inventories and ability tests, principles of test interpretation and report writing, theories and measurement of intelligence, the conceptualization and assessment of learning disabilities and other academic problems, and basic neuropsychology, as they apply to the clinical assessment of both children and adults. This course is a requirement for all first-year clinical graduate students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 718 – Psychological Assessment II

This course continues the topics introduced in PSYCH 717, including systems of clinical interviewing and observation, clinical use of self-report inventories and ability tests, principles of test interpretation and report writing, theories and measurement of intelligence, the conceptualization and assessment of learning disabilities and other academic problems, and basic neuropsychology, as they apply to the clinical assessment of both children and adults. This course is a requirement for all first-year clinical graduate students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 719 – Ethics, Diversity, and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology

This course reviews existing standards and ethical guidelines for clinical practice and research and serves as an introductory roadmap for building cultural competence in clinical psychology. Students will be introduced to legislation that affects applied psychology and we will review ethical issues in research and clinical practice. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 720A – Practicum in Interviewing & Cognitive Assessment I

This fall practicum develops basic clinical skills in interviewing, the administration and scoring of intelligence tests and other cognitive assessment techniques, the integration and interpretation of test information, and report-writing and client-feedback skills. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 720B – Practicum in Interviewing & Cognitive Assessment II

This winter practicum develops basic clinical skills in interviewing, the administration and scoring of intelligence tests and other cognitive assessment techniques, the integration and interpretation of test information, and report-writing and client-feedback skills. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 721A – Diagnostic Assessment Practicum I

This fall course is a weekly practicum during which students are exposed to diagnostic assessment, decision making, and practice. This course includes didactic learning, reading, case conferencing and supervised practice. Students will develop a diagnostic knowledge base that includes the DSM diagnostic categories and differential diagnoses, as well as diagnostic mindset about how to approach diagnostic interviewing. Students will be trained under supervision to screen for, identify, and develop working hypotheses about differential diagnoses. They will also begin developing proficiency in communicating diagnostic impressions to both colleagues (via participation in weekly intake meeting and the preparation of diagnostic summary sheets/reports) as well as clients (via observation of/participation in diagnostic feedback sessions). Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 721B – Diagnostic Assessment Practicum II

This winter course is a weekly practicum during which students are exposed to diagnostic assessment, decision making, and practice. This course includes didactic learning, reading, case conferencing and supervised practice. Students will develop a diagnostic knowledge base that includes the DSM diagnostic categories and differential diagnoses, as well as diagnostic mindset about how to approach diagnostic interviewing. Students will be trained under supervision to screen for, identify, and develop working hypotheses about differential diagnoses. They will also begin developing proficiency in communicating diagnostic impressions to both colleagues (via participation in weekly intake meeting and the preparation of diagnostic summary sheets/reports) as well as clients (via observation of/participation in diagnostic feedback sessions). Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 722C – Clinical Fieldwork Placement I

This spring practicum offers training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. All clinical students are required to enrol for this course in the spring concluding their first academic year of the program. Prior to undertaking the placement, the student must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 723 – Child Psychopathology and Psychotherapy

This course is designed to familiarize clinical students with a range of child psychotherapy modalities, such as behavioural and cognitive therapies, parental guidance, family and narrative therapies, and play therapy. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 724 – Personality & Measurement Theory

This course provides a survey of important theories of personality and a review of recent developments in personality research, with particular emphasis on current and emerging personality assessment methodologies and their application to clinical work. The course also covers classical test theory and SEM-based measurement models. Only students in the Clinical psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 725 – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

This is an advanced skills-based course designed to provide students with a solid understanding of cognitive-behavioural theory and basic skills in applying theory to treatment of anxiety and mood disorders in adults. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 726A – Practicum in Integrated Assessment I

This fall course provides advanced practicum training in the integrated assessment of children, adolescents, and adults. It extends the experiences provided through Psych 720A & B, Practicum in Interviewing & Cognitive Assessment, by increasing student responsibility for integration of assessment information, case conceptualization, report preparation and feedback, consultation, and supervision of junior students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 726B – Practicum in Integrated Assessment II

This winter course continues Psych 726A, providing further advanced practicum training in the integrated assessment of children, adolescents, and adults. It extends the experiences provided through Psych 720A & B, Practicum in Interviewing & Cognitive Assessment, by increasing student responsibility for integration of assessment information, case conceptualization, report preparation and feedback, consultation, and supervision of junior students. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 727 – Efficacy & Program Evaluation

This is an advanced applied research course designed to provide students with skills for conducting research in applied settings. Most non-academic clinical psychologists work in a hospital setting for at least part of their career, where, in addition to clinical service delivery, they will be responsible for research and program evaluation. This course reviews relevant research designs and advanced data analytic strategies for research in such settings. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 727A – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar III

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. All third-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 727B – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar III

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. All third-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 728 – Psychotherapy: Classical Roots & Contemporary Developments

This course will introduce students to influential theoretical perspectives, empirical studies, and intervention techniques in adult psychotherapy. Students will learn and apply theories on common transdiagnostic issues in psychotherapy (e.g., client shame and resistance) and interpersonal aspects of treatment (e.g., the therapeutic alliance, psychotherapy process). Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 729A – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum I

This is a fall practicum in which third-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 729B – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum II

This is a winter practicum in which third-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 729C – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum III

This is a spring practicum in which third-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 730A – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum I

This is a fall practicum in which third-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 730B – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum II

This is a winter practicum in which third-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 730C – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum III

This is a spring practicum in which third-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with individual supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 731 – Emotion-Focused Therapy

The purpose of this course is to provide students with grounding in the theory and skills required to work effectively with emotions in psychotherapy. The course will begin with an overview of the role of emotions in the development and maintenance of psychological disorders. Three major principles of change in EFT: Awareness, regulation, and restructuring of emotion will be examined and the principles of EFT to conceptualize and treat distress at the level of the individual, the dyad, and the family will be applied. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course.

PSYCH 732A – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum I

This is a fall practicum in which fourth-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 732B – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum II

This is a winter practicum in which fourth-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 732C – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum III

This is a spring practicum in which fourth-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 733A – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum I

This is a fall practicum in which fourth-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 733B – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum II

This is a winter practicum in which fourth-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 733C – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum III

This is a spring practicum in which fourth-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 734A – Practicum in Supervision I

The students in this fall course will serve as the primary supervisor for a case being seen by a junior therapist. Class will meet weekly to discuss assigned readings and to discuss the cases the students are supervising. The course instructor will also be following the supervised cases of the student therapists, although most of the supervision will be left to the senior trainee. Clinical students are required to take the course in their fourth or fifth year. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 734B – Practicum in Supervision II

The students in this winter course will serve as the primary supervisor for a case being seen by a junior therapist. Class will meet weekly to discuss assigned readings and to discuss the cases the students are supervising. The course instructor will also be following the supervised cases of the student therapists, although most of the supervision will be left to the senior trainee. Clinical students will be required to take the course in their fourth or fifth year. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 734C – Practicum in Supervision III

The students in this spring course will serve as the primary supervisor for a case being seen by a junior therapist. Class will meet weekly to discuss assigned readings and to discuss the cases the students are supervising. The course instructor will also be following the supervised cases of the student therapists, although most of the supervision will be left to the senior trainee. Clinical students will be required to take the course in their fourth or fifth year. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 735A – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum I

This is a fall practicum in which fifth-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 735B – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum II

This is a winter practicum in which fifth-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 735C – Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Practicum III

This is a spring practicum in which fifth-year clinical students see child and adolescent clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 736A – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum I

This is a fall practicum in which fifth-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 736B – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum II

This is a winter practicum in which fifth-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 736C – Adult Psychotherapy Practicum III

This is a spring practicum in which fifth-year clinical students see adult clients with various disorders for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) or other modes of psychotherapy. Students will meet with clinical supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 737A – Emotion-Focused Therapy Practicum

This is a fall practicum in which clinical students see adult and couple clients with various presenting disorders using Emotion-Focused Therapy (EFT). Students will meet with individual supervisors every week. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 737B – Emotion-Focused Therapy Practicum

This is a winter practicum that involves closely supervised assessment and intervention with couples experiencing relationship distress. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 737C – Couples' Therapy Practicum

This is a spring practicum that involves closely supervised assessment and intervention with couples experiencing relationship distress. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 738A – Clinical Fieldwork Placement II

This fall practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the second or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 738B – Clinical Fieldwork Placement II

This winter practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the second or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 738C – Clinical Fieldwork Placement II

This spring practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the second or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 739A – Clinical Fieldwork Placement III

This fall practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 739B – Clinical Fieldwork Placement III

This winter practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 739C – Clinical Fieldwork Placement III

This spring practicum offers advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a clinical setting. Students in the third or successive year of the program may enrol in this second four-month block placement in a community agency. A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 740A – Senior Practicum I

This fall practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 740B – Senior Practicum I

This winter practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 740C – Senior Practicum I

This spring practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 741A – Senior Practicum II

This fall practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 741B – Senior Practicum II

This winter practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 741C – Senior Practicum II

This spring practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 742A – Senior Practicum III

This fall practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 742B – Senior Practicum III

This winter practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 742C – Senior Practicum III

This spring practicum offers students in the fifth or successive year of the clinical program advanced training in assessment and treatment procedures in a four-month block placement in either a private practice setting or in our on-site clinical setting at the Center for Mental Health Research (CMHR). A student wishing to pursue this possibility must submit to the Director of the Clinical Program a proposal that outlines the plans for the practicum (e.g., the nature and quantity of clinical work) and the arrangements for supervision. Only students in the Clinical Psychology program are permitted to take this course. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis.

PSYCH 747 – C/P Research Seminar

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group.

PSYCH 747A – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar IV

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of memebers of the group. All fourth-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 747B – Behavioural Neuroscience Seminar IV

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MA or PhD work. The format of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of memebers of the group. All fourth-year students are required to take this course.

PSYCH 748 – Self-Regulation and Motivation

This seminar provides an overview of classic and contemporary social psychological approaches to the study of self-regulation and motivation. We will spend some time trying to answer the questions that necessarily begin any study of self-regulation and motivation, "what is motivation? What is it that people really want?," examining several major theories that have suggested different answers to those questions. We will also examine major theories of goal structure and the dynamics of goal pursuit. We'll use this foundation to think broadly about what social psychological research has to say about how people manage (and mismanage) life's opportunities and challenges, especially how individuals respond to success and failure, persist in the face of challenge, and resist temptation.

PSYCH 758 – Applied Practicum in Cognitive Psychology

Principles derived from research in cognitive psychology are widely used in applied contexts. As such training in cognitive psychology opens a number of doors for non-academic career paths. The goal of this course is to provide students with experience in this domain. To this end, students will work in an industry position related to cognitive psychology. Through this course, students will gain experience applying their research skills in an applied context, learn new skills relevant to applied research and/or knowledge translation, and expand their professional networks.

PSYCH 759 – Research Practicum in Cognitive Psychology

Research in cognitive psychology is comprised of a wide array of methods and approaches. Researchers able to effectively use this diverse toolkit are better positioned to solve important problems in cognitive psychology. The goal of this course is to provide students with novel experiences conducting research in cognitive psychology. To this end, contingent on the availability of appropriate opportunities, students will work in a laboratory outside that of their primary research advisor on an independent research project relevant to cognitive psychology. Through this course, students will gain experience applying new methods and approaches in cognitive psychology, learn new research skills, and expand their professional networks.

PSYCH 769 – Causal Reasoning

In this seminar a variety of issues dealing with causal thinking and reasoning will be covered. General topics will include associative learning, causal cue interactions (i.e. contiguity, covariation, mechanisms), categorization, naive physics, and scientific thinking. These topics will be discussed from a variety of methodological and theoretical perspectives including cross cultural analyses, developmental trajectories, evolutionary theory, and neuropsychological foundations.

PSYCH 770 – Basic Issues in Cognition

A seminar in which major methods and theoretical arguments in contemporary cognitive psychology will be examined through the reading and evaluation of significant papers of the past several decades.

PSYCH 771 – Basic Visual Processes

A seminar dealing with primary visual mechanisms. Such general topics as visual psychophysics, retinal photochemistry, brightness perception, colour mechanisms, binocular interactions, and physiological mechanisms of vision may be considered.

PSYCH 772 – Auditory Processes and Speech Perception

A seminar dealing with primary auditory processes and the basics of speech perception. Topics may include cochlear mechanisms, loudness, pitch, auditory localization, central auditory mechanisms, the motor theory of speech, contemporary speech theory, and artificial speech.

PSYCH 773 – Psychophysics and Measurement

A seminar covering classical psychophysics and more recent psychophysical scaling techniques. Topics include theory and methods of classical psychophysics (Weber, Fechner), direct and indirect scaling, multidimensional scaling, and signal detection theory. Contextual effects and sequential effects may be included.

PSYCH 774 – Visual Cognition

A seminar dealing with various aspects of higher-order visual processes. Topics may include aspects of visual representation, object and pattern recognition, and mental transformations.

PSYCH 775 – Consciousness and Cognition

Investigation of the methods and theories concerning the distinction between conscious and unconscious representation of knowledge.

PSYCH 776 – Problem Solving, Judgment and Decision-Making

A seminar on the cognitive processes involved in problem solving, judgment and decision making. Representative topics include reasoning, traditional and artificial intelligence approaches to problem solving, heuristics and biases in judgment, and theories of choice behaviour.

PSYCH 777 – Human Memory

A seminar considering various aspects of human memory. Topics may include long-term and short-term memory, memory codes, storage and retrieval processes, and theories of forgetting.

PSYCH 778 – Attention

A seminar dealing with aspects of attention in humans. The processes involved in selective attention and the various theories of attention will be considered. Additional topics may include a consideration of preattentive processes and the analysis of nonattended sensory input.

PSYCH 779 – Language and Reading

A seminar considering various aspects of psycholinguistics and reading. Possible topics include single-word identification, theories of reading, and various aspects of contemporary psycholinguistic theory.

PSYCH 779A – Cognitive Neuropsychology I

A seminar dealing with current research in human neuropsychology. Topics will include object agnosia, coloragnosia, prosopagnosia, and anosognosia, as well as other consequences of brain damage on human cognitive functions.

PSYCH 779B – Cognitive Neuropsychology II

A seminar dealing with current research in human neuropsychology. May include such topics as acquired dyslexia, aphasia, blindsight, frontal lobe function, memory dysfunction, visual neglect, and the neural correlates of human cognitive functions.

PSYCH 781 – Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory

Memory is intimately involved in most, if not all, domains of human cognition, from the ability to temporarily remember a phone number to the acquisition of language, to defining who we are. This course will consider the cognitive and neural organization of memory, the basis of remembering and forgetting, and the nature of false memories, with an emphasis on the consequences of brain changes associated with normal and pathological aging. Throughout, cognitive theory and behavioural evidence will be integrated with data from neuropsychology and functional brain imaging.

PSYCH 782 – Visual Neuroscience

In this seminar course we will examine the neural bases of visual processing with an emphasis on the domains of space and motion. Although we will review research dealing with a variety of different kinds of animals, we will focus on vision in primates, including humans.

PSYCH 783 – Neuroimaging of Cognition

Students will learn fundamental aspects of various neuroimaging techniques as they relate to broad areas of cognition including vision, attention, language, memory and executive control.

PSYCH 784 – Human Neuroanatomy and Neuropathology

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic aspects of anatomy and pathology in the human brain. After completing this course, students should expect to have mastered the location of major neuroanatomic landmarks, be able to identify these landmarks on both postmortem brains and neuroradiologic films (i.e., CT scan, MRI scan), understand rudimentary brain structure-function relations, outline the gross morphological and cellular consequences of major categories of neuropathology, understand fundamental neuropathologic mechanisms associated with various brain diseases, and describe the general impact of various neuropathologic processes on cognitive and behavioural functioning. (Offered in alternate years from PSYCH 785.)

PSYCH 785 – Attention and the Brain

This course will take students through the dominant theories of attention over the past century before exploring what various brain imaging techniques have added to these theories. For the latter portion of the course students will present key contributions to our understanding of attention from neuroimaging techniques covering the full range of dominant techniques and used in the field (ERP, fMRI, TMS, tDCS). In groups, students will then devise changes to the experimental designs as presented with an eye to improving the study. These 'brainstorming' sessions will then be shared with the rest of the class. The aims of the course are threefold: first, to expose students to the dominant theories of attention, second, to expose students to the pros and cons of a wide variety of neuroimaging techniques and third to develop their skills in experimental design within the constraints of those techniques.

PSYCH 786 – Neuropsychological Assessment Practicum

This course is designed to give students practical experience in neuropsychological evaluation. The seminar will emphasize the clinical and technical aspects of clinical interviewing, neuropsychological assessment, report writing, and patient/family education. Students will become familiar with several conventional neuropsychological tests such as the WMS-R/III, Halstead-Reitan Battery, Wisconsin Card-Sorting Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Semantic Fluency Test, Ruff Figural Fluency Test, California Verbal Learning Test, Benton Visual-Spatial Tests, and the Grooved Pegboard Test. In addition, students will be required to evaluate a person referred to one of several university clinics secondary to neuropsychological complications. Enrollment is limited. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis. Students who do not have the necessary prerequisite must seek the consent of the Department.

PSYCH 787 – Visual Perception

This course focuses on both classic and contemporary studies of visual perception. The readings will involve studies of perception from a variety of perspectives including cognitive, cognitive neuroscience, Gestalt, phenomenological and ecological perspectives of vision. Studies of normal, unusual and disordered perception will be discussed. Students will be required to (a) facilitate a discussion in class based on the assigned research articles, (b) write commentaries on the articles covered each week, and (c) write a paper outlining a novel conceptual idea or a proposed experiment based on the studies discussed in class.

PSYCH 788 – Epidemiologic Methods in Aging Research

This course introduces the application of epidemiologic methods to the study of older persons. This lecture/discussion will present core epidemiologic concepts and methodologic issues in epidemiologic students of older persons. We will then study predictors of health and three major health outcomes: longevity/mortality, functional status/disability, and disease. Students will critically evaluate epidemiologic studies in aging research and will investigate a specific topic in this field in depth.

PSYCH 789 – Mind-wandering and Inattention

This course will review recent studies of mind-wandering and inattention. The primary focus will be on empirical and theoretical journal articles. The topic will be considered primarily from the cognitive neuroscience perspective though other approaches to the topic will also be considered.

PSYCH 790 – Case Studies in Neuropsychology

The cognitive disorders that follow brain damage are an important source of insight into the neural bases of human cognitive functioning. The single-case approach in neuropsychology has made a significant contribution to our understanding of the architecture of the brain and its functions. In this course we will review the history, principles and methods used by neuropsychologists to understand perception, attention, memory, language, and consciousness. Disorders of perception and vision such as agnosias, of attention such as neglect, of language such as apshasias and dyslexias, of memory as in dementias, and amnesia, and of higher-order functions as in callosal split brain patients will be considered. We will also examine the relationship between findings from case studies and neuroimaging of cognitive functions. By reviewing and discussing theoretical implications of classic and current research in neuropsychology, students will develop an understanding of how a patient-based approach can inform current theories of human cognition.

PSYCH 791 – Real and Virtual Spaces

Topics will include spatial cognition, wayfinding and navigation with a special emphasis on how the use of virtual reality methods might contribute to novel experimental approaches in these domains. In addition to seminars, students will have opportunities to learn to use VR methods in a hands-on environment to design and write scripts for VR studies. (Because of limitations on the capacity of the virtual reality lab, enrolment in the course will be limited to 10 students).

PSYCH 792 – An Introduction to Methods in Computational Neuroscience

Computations neuroscience uses mathematical and computational methods to develop, explore, and test theories and models in neuroscience. Increasingly this approach is being applied to behavioural and cognitive questions. This course is intended to give students with a limited mathematical and computational background a familiarity with computational methods applied to cognitive issues and to improve the ability of the student to evaluate psychological research that employs these methods. The course will require students to perform a series of computational and programming exercises using an existing open source neural simulation software package. (Held with PSYCH 463).

PSYCH 793 – Electrophysiology Methodologies in Brain Research: from Basic Concepts to Lab Practice

This course offers the basic knowledge necessary to understand and carry research in psychology using the electro-encephalography (EEG) and event-related-potential (ERP) methodologies in humans. Students will learn the principles behind the EEG/ERP recordings and analyses, how to design EEG studies in normal and abnormal populations and across the life-time and how to analyze and interpret EEG and ERP data, including source localization. The course is composed of a theoretical part and a practial hands-on lab component in which students will see how to test and record human subjects in EEG and how to analyze their recordings using specific software. Students willing to incorporate EEG as part of their research are strongly encouraged to attend this course.

PSYCH 794 – Cognitive Neuroscience of Face Perception

The human face is one of the most important social stimuli we encounter every day. Multiple aspects of the face such as its identity, age, race, gender, emotion or gaze direction need to be extracted and processed rapidly and accurately by the brain to allow efficient social interactions. This seminar offers a multidisciplinary approach to the study of face perception. We will cover major aspects of face processing including the perception and recognition of identity, emotions and gaze direction, their neural bases and their links to social cognition and theory of mind. We will discuss chapters and fundamental papers integrating the most recent findings from neuropsychology, neuroimaging and cognitive psychology. This course is most suited for students interested in brain-behaviour relationships. Basic Cognitive Neuroscience knowledge is required.

PSYCH 795 – Structure and Function in the Developing Brain

This course will examine the development of brain-behaviour relationships between pre-infancy and adulthood from converging behavioural, neurophysiological, and neuroimaging perspectives. Topics will include structural brain development, the emergence and refinement of functional brain systems, sequelae of early brain insult, and the role of plasticity in recovery and 'neuroenhancement'. This course is not recommended for students outside of the areas of Psychology, Health Studies and Gerontology, and Kinesiology.

PSYCH 800 – Psychometric Theory & Structural Equation Modeling

The first part of the course introduces classical test theory and test construction principles, and addresses issues in interpreting test scores. The second part covers exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. The last part of the course examines important measurement issues that arise in the analysis of experimental and nonexperimental data.

PSYCH 801 – Advanced Structural Equation Modeling

This course addresses contemporary advances in the areas of psychometric theory and structural equation modeling. Included are topics such as item response theory, nonlinear factor analysis, latent curve models and other longitudinal models, and models for analyzing dyadic data.

PSYCH 803 – Meta-Analysis

Meta-analysis refers to the quantitative synthesis of relationships that have been studied in the research literature. Meta-analyses integrate and synthesize effect sizes that are reported in prior studies. This course focuses on how to conduct a meta-analysis and interpret its results. To this end we will (a) go through the process of conducting a meta-analysis, (b) read and critique applications of meta-analysis, (c) conduct original meta-analysis in student teams in areas of interest to students, and (d) read and discuss primary research that applies, develops, or critiques meta-analysis.

PSYCH 804 – Multi-Level Modeling Applications in Psychology

This course is designed to provide graduate students in Psychology with the background and skills to be able to interpret and conduct multi-level data analysis. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) software will be used for instruction and assignments. Conceptual issues with multi-level data and theory will also be addressed. Applications may involve data concerning work groups in organizations, romantic couples, individual change over time (as in learning growth curves), and event-level associations of mood states with other variables (as in "diary" studies). Extensions to 3-level models and to "non-linear" models (e.g., for count and rate data) will also be discussed.

PSYCH 810 – Directed Studies

PSYCH 820 – Community Practicum I

The student will be placed in the Early Childhood Education Centre (ECEC) or one of several community locations, depending on availability and at their discretion following an interview in September with interested students. The practicum will comprise 1 half day a week for the duration of the term. In each location, students will work 'in program' alongside the educators and/or professionals and/or staff. The Community Practicum will serve to provide students with 'hands-on' experience in an applied setting relevant to their educational and professional goals and provide an opportunity to witness children's learning as it relates to what students have learned, and are currently investigating, in the field of child development science and communicative development.

PSYCH 821 – Community Practicum II

The student will be placed in the Early Childhood Education Centre (ECEC) or one of several community locations, depending on availability and at their discretion following an interview in September with interested students. The practicum will comprise 1 half day a week for the duration of the term. In each location, students will work 'in program' alongside the educators and/or professionals and/or staff. The Community Practicum will serve to provide students with 'hands-on' experience in an applied setting relevant to their educational and professional goals and provide an opportunity to witness children's learning as it relates to what students have learned, and are currently investigating, in the field of child development science and communicative development.

PSYCH 822 – Community Practicum III

The student will be placed in the Early Childhood Education Centre (ECEC) or one of several community locations, depending on availability and at their discretion following an interview in September with interested students. The practicum will comprise 1 half day a week for the duration of a term. In each location, students will work 'in program' alongside the educators and/or professionals and/or staff. The Community Practicum will serve to provide students with 'hands-on' experience in an applied setting relevant to their educational and professional goals and provide an opportunity to witness children's learning as it relates to what student have learned, and are currently learning and investigating, in the field of child developmental science and communicative development.

PSYCH 823 – Research Apprenticeship I

Intended for students who will be seeking further studies at the Ph.D. level, this research apprenticeship will provide a student with a more advanced laboratory research project over two terms and requiring approximately an extra 3.5 hours per week in addition to the 10 hours per week required of the Research Lab Internship required of all MASc DCS students. The particular project that the student will be engaged in, and the ultimate end product of the Apprenticeship at the end of the two terms, will be determined by the student and advisor together.

PSYCH 824 – Research Apprenticeship II

Intended for students who will be seeking further studies at the Ph.D. level, this research apprenticeship will provide a student with a more advanced laboratory research project over two terms and requiring approximately an extra 3.5 hours per week in addition to the 10 hours per week required of the Research Lab Internship required of all MASc DCS students. The particular project that the student will be engaged in, and the ultimate end project of the Apprenticeship at the end of the two terms, will be determined by the student and advisor together.

PSYCH 836A – Advanced Practicum in Applied Psychology

Part-time supervised field work training in an applied setting. For on-campus students only. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis

PSYCH 844 – Special Topics in Educational Psychology

PSYCH 846 – Special Topics in Applied Psychology

PSYCH 851 – Research Lab Internship I

The intern will be placed in one of the research labs of a Developmental division or affiliated program faculty member for a minimum of 15 hours a week. The student will complete one or more research projects with the goal to develop research skills related to empirical measurement of communication such as study design, data collection, statistical analysis and written preparation of research results.

PSYCH 852 – Research Lab Internship II

The intern will be placed in one of the research labs of a Developmental division or affiliated program faculty memeber for a minimum of 15 hours a week. The student will complete one or more research projects with the goal to develop research skills related to empirical measurement of communication such as study design, data collection, statistical analysis and written preparation of research results.

PSYCH 853 – Research Lab Internship III

The intern will be placed in one of the research labs of a Developmental division or affiliated program faculty memeber for a minimum of 15 hours a week. The student will complete one or more research projects with the goal to develop research skills related to empirical measurement of communication such as study design, data collection, statistical analysis and written preparation of research results.

PSYCH 870 – Research Design & Methods

This course concerns research design and the operationalization of variables in psychological research. Among the topics covered are these: research designs (experimental, correlational, and quasi-experimental), internal validity, external validity, construct validity, reliability, sources of bias and artifact, strategies for ruling out confounds, mediations, effect sizes, and ethical issues in research. Non-psychology student require permission of the instructor to enroll.

PSYCH 875 – Organizational Psychology

This course considers psychological theories and research that focuses on the behavior of people at work. In particular, there will be an emphasis on the psychology of the individual at work (often referred to as the "micro" component of organizational psychology). Accordingly, topics examined will be self-regulation, negotiation, ethics, and citizenship behavior. By necessity, coverage of these topics will not be comprehensive; the primary goal of the course is to simply introduce students to a broad range of theories and topics that are relevant to organizational psychology.

PSYCH 876 – The Psychology of Justice in the Workplace

This doctoral seminar will examine historic and contemporary psychological theories and research on justice with a focus on understanding the dynamics of justice in the work setting.

PSYCH 877 – Work Motivation

This course will provide an overview of the theory and empirical data pertaining to work motivation. Emphasis will be placed on individual goals; specifically, the definition of goals, how goals are set and adopted, and how goal-striving unfolds over time. Readings will highlight the dynamic, within-person nature of many motivational processes. Special attention will be paid to formal (i.e., mathematical) theories of dynamic self-regulation.

PSYCH 878 – Job Performance

The primary focus of this course will be job performance and related issues. Readings will cover job analysis, performance appraisal, and the "criterion problem" in I/O psychology. The definition, measurement, and operationalization of job performance will be emphasized.

PSYCH 879 – Personnel Selection

The primary focus of this course will be personnel selection. Readings will focus on constructs used in personnel selection, methods used in personnel selection, and issues related to fairness and bias in personnel selection. The importance of measurement of psychological constructs will be emphasized. A working knowledge of correlation and regression is required.

PSYCH 880 – Industrial and Organizational Psychology

A general graduate seminar in significant areas of industrial and organizational psychology. Topics will include personnel selection, training and development, motivation, leadership, job satisfaction and performance appraisal.

PSYCH 881A – Personnel Psychology

Basic personnel functions will be discussed, including job analysis, personnel selection, job evaluation, and criterion development, as well as the economics and legal environment in which these activities take place.

PSYCH 883 – Organizational Development

An introduction to the theories and techniques for improving organizational effectiveness. This course is open to students, with instructor consent, who have sufficient background in human resource management or organizational behaviour.

PSYCH 884 – Special Topics in Industrial & Organizational Psychology

A number of workshops on topics of current interest in industrial psychology will be held throughout the year.

PSYCH 885 – Industrial & Organizational Psychology Research Seminar

A seminar including both student an faculty presentations of current research and student proposals for MASc/MA or PhD work. The seminar is held weekly or biweekly depending on availability of speakers, and the format may vary, depending on the research topics of members of the group.

PSYCH 886 – Psychology of Training

Examines major topics and issues regarding the psychology of training in work organizations. Areas typically covered include task analysis, training objectives, curriculum development, instructional techniques, and training evaluation.

PSYCH 887 – Research Methods in Industrial/Organizational

Topics will include experimental and non-experimental research design; internal, external, and construct validity; psychometrics including reliability and factorial structure; statistical inference; and practical considerations in measurement and evaluation in I/O Psychology. Non-psychology students require permission of the instructor to enroll.

PSYCH 888 – Negotiation: Theory and Practice

Negotiation: Theory and Practice addresses planning, motivation, communication, information exchange, influence, relationships, emotion, and reaching objectives in the diverse array of interdependent decision-making contexts faced by managers. Topics include distributive and integrative negotiations, coalitions, negotiating on teams, dispute resolution, and multi-party negotiations. Mandatory first class attendance.