Zachary Seguin

PHARM Courses

PHARM 110 – Systems Approach to the Study of the Human Body 1

This integrated anatomy and physiology course and its continuation in PHARM 111 cover all the major human body systems using a systems approach. Major themes are the relationships between structure and function, and homeostasis of the cellular environment. [Offered: W]

PHARM 111 – Systems Approach to the Study of the Human Body 2

This integrated anatomy and physiology course and its prerequisite PHARM 110 cover all the major human body systems using a systems approach. Major themes are the relationships between structure and function, and homeostasis of the cellular environment. [Offered: S]

PHARM 120 – Introduction to the Profession of Pharmacy

This course introduces students to the profession of pharmacy with its many opportunities. Topics include Canadian and global health care systems, the roles of health care professionals, the social determinants of health and the current and future practice of pharmacy. [Offered: W]

PHARM 120A – Introduction to the Profession of Pharmacy

This first part of a two-part course sequence introduces students to the profession of pharmacy with its many opportunities. Topics include Canadian and global health care systems, the roles of health care professionals, and the current and future practice of pharmacy. Through community service learning, students will gain an understanding of citizenship, needs within a community and the people of a community. [Offered: W]

PHARM 120B – Introduction to the Profession of Pharmacy

This second part of a two-part course sequence introduces students to the profession of pharmacy with its many opportunities. Topics include Canadian and global health care systems, the roles of health care professionals, and the current and future practice of pharmacy. Through community service learning, students will gain an understanding of citizenship, needs within a community and the people of a community. [Offered: S]

PHARM 124 – Pharmaceutics 1

This course, and PHARM 125, consider the scientific and technical aspects important in dosage form design. The lectures and practical laboratory experiences emphasize the role of biopharmaceutics, preformulation and physical pharmacy in the development of safe and effective dosage forms. [Offered: W]

PHARM 125 – Pharmaceutics 2

This course is a continuation of PHARM 124. [Offered: S]

PHARM 126 – Pharmaceutical Calculations

This course provides students with the tools necessary to carry out calculations in a wide range of settings. The scope of pharmaceutical calculations includes concentration expressions, physical and chemical properties, measurement of quantities, dosing calculations, rates of administration, and aligation methods.

PHARM 127 – Professional Communication Skills in Pharmacy Practice

This course is designed to help students develop the core communication skills required for success in a career in Pharmacy. This is a foundational course. Key concepts introduced in this course are applied throughout the curriculum. [Offered: W]

PHARM 128 – Professional Communication Skills in Pharmacy Practice 2

This second professional communications course builds on the skills acquired in PHARM 127, with increased focus on providing opportunities for students to practice and hone their skill. Student assignments focus on writing, presentation and patient interviewing skills. [Offered: S]

PHARM 129 – Professional Practice 1

This course introduces students to the building blocks of pharmacy practice including medication dispensing, jurisprudence, drug information and patient safety. Patient care focuses on self-care and providing students with processes for assessing, educating, and counselling patients about non-prescription medications. [Offered: W]

PHARM 130 – Professional Practice 2

Professional Practice 2 continues to develop the foundational knowledge and skills introduced in PHARM 129. [Offered: S]

PHARM 131 – Professional Practice Laboratory 1

The knowledge acquired from PHARM 129 will be applied to simulated pharmacy situations and patient case scenarios. This will provide the opportunity for students to demonstrate their technical skills and clinical knowledge in a practical context. [Offered: S]

PHARM 140 – Computing for Pharmacists - Fundamental Concepts

An introduction to the fundamentals of computing and the mathematics essentials needed for other courses in the program. The course will examine the nature of information systems, process support systems and the information enterprise used to understand pharmaco-informatics. Relevant bioinformatics, health informatics and pharmacy information systems will be covered. [Offered: S]

PHARM 141 – Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry, Toxicology and Pharmacology

The basic principles of medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and pharmacology are introduced and examined in the context of the autonomic nervous system. Pharmacokinetics, adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, pharmacogenetics, and the body's response to drug compounds are also discussed. The tools and principles discovered are applied to specific disease states as well as physiological systems, including the visual and cardiovascular systems. [Offered: S]

PHARM 150 – Introduction to Applied Pharmaceutical Sciences

An introduction will be provided to major themes in applied pharmaceutical sciences with an emphasis on practical application in patient care settings. An overview of key topics in applied pharmaceutical sciences will be provided, including drug nomenclature, classification and categorization, rudimentary elements of structure-function relationships, principles of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and the drug discovery process, with application to current issues in practice such as substance abuse and use of medicines in society. [Offered: W]

PHARM 151 – Foundation and Application of Health Informatics

This course provides a fundamental understanding of Health Informatics. This will encompass the nature, key concepts, and applications of this discipline to address challenges in the health field. The material presented will target the high profile areas of Health Informatics and point the participants in the direction of broader and deeper explorations. [Offered: S, F]

PHARM 155 – Introduction to Drug Information Fundamentals

This course provides students with basic skills in retrieving and assessing drug information and medical literature. The foundation acquired in this course will be used throughout the Integrated Patient Focused Care series in critically appraising literature to support an evidence-based patient care model. [Offered: S]

PHARM 220 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 1

This is the first of nine sequential courses that are designed to enable students to understand, integrate, and apply concepts from Pharmacology, Medicinal Chemistry, Toxicology, Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Clinical Biochemistry and Pathphysiology, and Applied Microbiology to patient scenarios. Students will not only learn core principles from each of these disciplines, but they will also develop skills in critical appraisal, patient assessment, and clinical problem-solving. Ultimately, students will be able to make confident decisions regarding a patient's care plan. The first course will cover core foundational knowledge. [Offered: F]

PHARM 221 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 2

This is the second of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed through patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: F]

PHARM 222 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 3

This is the third of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed through patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: S]

PHARM 223 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 4

This is the fourth of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed through patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: S]

PHARM 224 – Pharmacokinetic Fundamentals

Pharmacokinetic principles and quantitative analysis will be used to describe the events that transpire following drug administration. The influence of physiological and biochemical processes on drug pharmacokinetics will be discussed.[Offered: F]

PHARM 227 – Health Systems in Society

Building on PHARM 120 and PHARM 129, students will extend their understanding of the Canadian health-care system, including its structure, financing, regulation and policies. By means of relevant health-care examples, students will develop their skills in ethical analysis, and learn to apply basic principles of public policy analysis, political science, economics, and quality measurement. Students will also be exposed to some international drug issues and how they compare with Canada's pharmaceutical system. The course emphasizes critical analysis and writing skills. [Offered: F]

PHARM 228 – Professional Practice 3

Professional Practice 3 is a lab-based course where knowledge acquired in the introductory Professional Practice courses is applied to simulated pharmacy situations and patient case scenarios. This provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate their technical skill and clinical knowledge in a practical way and helps prepare students for their first co-op work experience. [Offered: F]

PHARM 229 – Professional Practice 4

Professional Practice 4 combines lecture and lab components, focusing on providing students with the knowledge and skills to fulfil requirements of the expanding role pharmacists play in providing patient care. Physical assessment and an understanding of how analyses and devices inform decision-making are examples of topics that may be covered. [Offered: S]

PHARM 232 – Medical Microbiology

This course applies microbiological methods (aseptic techniques, streak plating, culture handling, laboratory safety, etc.) to clinically relevant microbiological and immunological practice. Course material is applicable to and coordinated with Integrated Patient Focused Care courses. [Offered: F]

PHARM 232L – Medical Microbiology Laboratory 1

This course provides an introduction to microbiology, focussing on the understanding and application of basic microbiological methods (aseptic techniques, streak plating, culture handling, laboratory safety, etc). It also delves into clinically relevant micrbiological and immunological practice and focuses on the understanding and application of available methods for determination of microbes, demonstration of technique applications to infectious microbes and investigative case studies. Course material is applicable to and coordinated with Integrated Patient Focused Care modules. [Offered: W]

PHARM 233L – Medical Microbiology Laboratory 2

This course is a continuation of medical microbiology and immunological laboratory topics and techniques introduced in PHARM 232L. The course aims to provide advanced understanding and application of medically relevant techniques to identify infectious microbes, ability to efficiently design experiments to determine specific microbes, and effectively interpret data and develop hypotheses. The use of investigative case studies and demonstration is heavily emphasized. Course material is pertinent and coordinated with the Integrated Patient Focused Care modules. [Offered: F]

PHARM 237 – Applications of Analyses and Devices in Pharmacy and Medicine

This course provides an overview of the methods and applications of devices and pharmaceutical analyses in the practice of pharmacy and medicine. By means of relevant case studies, the application of the analyses and devices used in home, clinic, and laboratory settings for screening, diagnosis, and monitoring are covered. Methodologies include immunossays, gel electrophoresis/Western blot, enzyme-based assays, spectrophotometry, fluroescence and chromatography. [Offered: F]

PHARM 252 – Institutional Pharmacy Practice

This course offers insight into how organizations/institutions manage patient health. It examines the structure, governance and delivery of services within health systems such as primary care, family health teams, acute care, home care and long-term care facilities. Processes within health care institutions for optimizing management of patients, operations, facilities and medications are all addressed. [Offered: S]

PHARM 262 – Foundation and Application of Health Informatics

This course provides a fundamental understanding of Health Informatics. This will encompass the nature, key concepts, and applications of this discipline to address challenges in the health field. The material presented will target the high profile areas of Health Informatics and point the participants in the direction of broader and deeper explorations. [Offered: F]

PHARM 290 – Seminars in Pharmacy 1

Through the Seminar Series of courses students are exposed to a number of speakers who address relevant topics within a content area. Speakers may include subject-matter experts, patients, and health care professionals.

PHARM 291 – Seminars in Pharmacy 2

This course entails a weekly seminar on topics in Pharmacy. The range of materials to be presented include current issues, special topics demonstrating new trends in patient care and treatment, competing perspectives in the pharmaceutical arena, and scopes of Pharmacy practice.

PHARM 320 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 5

This is the fifth of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed through patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: W]

PHARM 321 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 6

This is the sixth of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed through patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: W]

PHARM 322 – Clinical Application of Pharmaceutical Sciences

This course presents leading-edge discoveries in the pharmaceutical sciences. Students will be required to define the clinical application of such discoveries by integrating information from multiple disciplines in order to develop strategies to solve fundamental health-care problems. [Offered: S]

PHARM 323 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 7

This is the seventh of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed through patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: F]

PHARM 324 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 8

This is the eighth of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed though patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: F]

PHARM 329 – Professional Practice 5

Professional Practice 5 is a lab-based course that refines basic skills and addresses additional areas of expanding scope of practice for pharmacists. In particular, a component of the course provides students with an opportunity to acquire skills in immunizing patients. [Offered: W]

PHARM 330 – Professional Practice 6

Professional Practice 6 combines lecture and lab components and focuses on preparing students for their first years of professional life. [Offered: F]

PHARM 350 – Fundamentals of Business Administration and Management

This course teaches the strategic management principles behind marketing, operations, finance and accounting, and human resources management in an integrated format. [Offered: W]

PHARM 351 – Management Issues in Community Pharmacy Practice

This business course leverages concepts presented in PHARM 350 and applies them to the specific opportunities and challenges found in community practice settings. Topics that will be addressed include business planning and human resource management in the community pharmacy context.

PHARM 352 – Management Issues in Pharmacy Practice in Organizations

This business course leverages concepts presented in PHARM 350 and applies them to the specific opportunities and challenges found in institutional settings. Topics that will be addressed include business planning and human resource management in hospitals and long-term care facilities.

PHARM 353 – Entrepreneurship in Pharmacy

This business course leverages concepts presented in PHARM 350 and applies them to the specific opportunities and challenges facing entrepreneurs and/or individuals creating innovative solutions within more traditional pharmacy environments. Topics that will be addressed include business planning and relationship management for entrepreneurs.

PHARM 361 – Advanced Compounding

Building upon experiences gained in Pharmacy 124 and 125 (Pharmaceutics 1 and 2), Advanced Compounding introduces the student to more complex formulations and their use in specific patient populations. Example topics include compounding for geriatric and pediatric patients, veterinary products, USP and its application to extemporaneous compounding, and stability and QC testing. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 362 – Advanced Patient Self Care

Advanced Patient Self Care teaches students to critically evaluate the use of self-care therapeutic options such as Natural Health Products, Schedule II and III drugs and functional foods in various disease states and populations. Other topics include: the Natural Health Product approval process, regulatory issues for self-selection products and reimbursement for self-care services. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 363 – Global Infectious Disease Management

This course addresses global infectious diseases from a public health perspective in an integrated case study format. It focuses on the role of the pharmacist, mode of transmission of these diseases, prevention, control, emergency preparedness, appropriate use of vaccines and vaccine administration. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 364 – The Pharmacist as Educator

This course will introduce the basic learning theory and practice that pharmacists use as educators of specific audiences, such as patients, other healthcare providers, other pharmacists, etc. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 365 – Biotech Pharma Business Strategy

This course introduces students to the business aspects of managing new biotechnological pharmaceutical innovation. Students will learn to analyse and connect scientific principles underlying novel and incremental technologies with the commercialization process. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 366 – Concepts in Nutritional Sciences

This course focuses on the role of nutrition in the attainment of optimal patient health. Topics include nutrition for optimal growth and risk reduction of chronic disease; nutrition in special populations; functional foods and nutraceuticals; enteral and parenteral nutrition; and the role of the pharmacist in nutrition counseling. [Offered: W,S, F]

PHARM 367 – Pediatric Pharmacy

This course introduces the student to the more complex pediatric therapeutics and pharmacy-specific issues associated with a pediatric population. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 368 – Advanced Drug Information & Evidence-Based Medicine

This course builds on the knowledge and skills students have acquired about the retrieval, analysis and use of drug information. Students will apply the principles of evidence-based medicine and critically appraise literature in responding to the needs of a variety of patient and professional audiences. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 369 – Global Medical Aid

This course will explore the opportunities and issues in providing global medical aid and global health issues. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 370 – Personal & New Venture Financial Management

This course covers topics that are relevant to the financial decision making of individuals, with a particular focus on future professionals who have any interest in being involved in new business ventures. Knowledge and skills learned will allow students to take advantage of the career diversity and resulting business opportunities related to pharmacy. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 371 – Advanced Topics in Health Economics

This course uses economic tools and principles to examine micro and macro health- and pharmaco-economics with respect to the organization, delivery, and financing of health care, health care policy development, and assessment of drug cost versus value. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 372 – Strategic Global Health & Pharmacy Practice

This course focuses on the challenges of providing health care and pharmacy-related services within a global context. The course will examine how cultural variations and socio-political factors affect drug therapy and patient care. The specific impact of pharmaceuticals/vaccinations on global health will be featured. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 373 – Healthcare Delivery in Rural and Underserved Populations

This course will develop students' understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities in providing healthcare to rural and underserved populations. Through lectures and field work, students will examine topics such as health care disparities, interprofessional collaboration, the role of the rural pharmacist, and underserved patient case studies. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 374 – Complementary and Alternate Medicine

This Complementary and Alternate Medicine course is designed to give the student an overview of complementary and alternative healing practices and will heighten student awareness that CAM is multifactorial and often includes belief systems and practices other than drug therapy. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 375 – Substance Abuse & Chemical Dependency

This course serves as an overview of addiction, chemical abuse and chemical dependency and how pharmacists can impact those affected. Topics include prevention, identification, treatment options, clinical aspects of treatment, and an understanding of support systems available for those in recovery. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 376 – Practicing Pharmacy with Diverse Populations

This course will provide students with tools to optimize patient care when working with diverse communities. Diversity will be defined in its broadest sense encompassing a discussion in how differences in ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, physical or mental ability etc. impact patient care. Students will learn about the unique needs of different populations and through a combination of lectures and case studies learn how to sensitively and effectively work with a variety of patients. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 377 – Drug-Induced Disease

Drug-Induced Disease will explore the most appropriate interventions for prevention, detection and management of drug-induced diseases. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the pharmacist as a proactive practitioner in minimizing morbidity and mortality from drug-induced diseases. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 378 – Advanced Women's Health Pharmacotherapeutics

This course will examine the pharmacotherapy of health conditions commonly experienced by women across their lifespan. Topics will include menstrual and reproductive disorders; contraception, pregnancy and childbirth; and common diseases that may be experienced differently by women. The course will also explore the ethics, commercialization and medicalization of women's health. [Offered W, S, F]

PHARM 379 – Ethical Decision-Making in Pharmacy Practice

This course explores the principles of ethical decision-making in healthcare and applies them to various scenarios and actual cases in different pharmacy practice settings. Discussion will focus on ethical dilemmas where a variety of stakeholders and implications must be considered. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 390 – Seminars in Pharmacy 3

This course entails a weekly seminar on topics in Pharmacy. The range of materials to be presented include current issues, special topics demonstrating new trends in patient care and treatment, competing perspectives in the pharmaceutical arena, and scopes of Pharmacy practice.

PHARM 391 – Seminars in Pharmacy 2

Through the Seminar Series of courses students are exposed to a number of speakers who address relevant topics within a content area. Speakers may include subject-matter experts, patients, and health care professionals.

PHARM 400 – Independent Study 1

This elective is designed to permit students to pursue areas of personal interest and/or to gain personal experience in scientific research through a research project. PHARM400 typically involves a reading/survey based project involving a review of and collection of data from relevant scientific literature, and the synthesis of new information based upon this review. Research may be conducted in the School of Pharmacy, in a hospital, community pharmacy, pharmaceutical company, etc. A maximum of 1.0 credit may be taken as Independent Study courses.

PHARM 401 – Independent Study 2

This elective is designed to permit students to pursue areas of personal interest and/or to gain personal experience scientific research through a research project. PHARM 401 requires a research based project and will typically include a review of pertinent scientific literature and generation and analysis of new data. Research may be conducted in the School of Pharmacy, in a hospital, community pharmacy, pharmaceutical company, etc. A maximum of 1.0 credit may be taken as Independent Study courses.

PHARM 415 – Clinical Rotation: Integrated Care

The clinical rotations in this final experiential module will emphasize problem-solving in the everyday milieu of patient care within a setting of integrated inter-disciplinary patient care. The expectation is that the student will be implementing, testing and refining personal clinical skills. [Offered: S]

PHARM 415A – Clinical Rotation: Integrated Care

The first part of this two course series provides assessment of student readiness to enter practice. It consists of two components: Clinic, where students provide direct patient care in interprofessional clinical settings and Symposium, where students deliver seminars oriented to patients or other healthcare professionals.[Offered: W]

PHARM 415B – Clinical Rotation: Integrated Care

The second part of this two course series provides further assessments of student readiness to enter practice. It consists of two components: Clinic, where students provide direct patient care in interprofessional clinical settings and Symposium, where students deliver seminars targeted for patients or other healthcare professionals. [Offered: S]

PHARM 420 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 7

This is the seventh of nine sequential courses. Topics discussed through patient scenarios and assignments will focus on two to three body systems. [Offered: W]

PHARM 421 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 8

This is the eighth of nine sequential courses. Several special topics will be covered including pediatrics and geriatrics. [Offered: W]

PHARM 422 – Integrated Patient Focused Care 9

This is the ninth of nine sequential courses. Complex integrated cases will be covered, along with special topics. [Offered: W, S]

PHARM 425 – Symposium

Symposium offers senior students the opportunity to deliver a seminar in a content area of their choice. Students will demonstrate an ability to critically appraise literature from a variety of sources and synthesize information in both written and presentation formats. [Offered: W, S]

PHARM 428 – Professional Practice 4

This is a continuation course in Pharmacy Practice. It requires students to demonstrate a consolidation of knowledge from previous courses, and to draw upon and complement material from the Pharmacy Practice, Pharmaceutical Care, and Social/Administrative Pharmacy courses and apply them to discussion of issues related to the psychology of patient care and pharmacy practice. Students will continue to utilize and develop strategic thinking and critical appraisal skills. [Offered: S]

PHARM 430 – Clinical Rotation 1: Primary Care

Students will provide supervised direct patient care in a primary care setting. Over the course of 24 weeks, students will be placed in three 8-week rotations where the student's ability to apply therapeutic knowledge in a live practice setting will be refined and assessed. [Offered: W, S]

PHARM 440 – Clinical Rotation 2: Institutional

Students will provide supervised direct patient care in an institutional setting. Over the course of 24 weeks, students will be placed in three 8-week rotations where the student's ability to apply therapeutic knowledge in a live practice setting will be refined and assessed. [Offered: W, S]

PHARM 450 – Clinical Rotation 3: Elective

Students will practice in a variety of Pharmacy settings under the supervision of qualified preceptors. Over the course of 24 weeks, students will be placed in three 8-week rotations where the student's ability to apply therapeutic knowledge in a live practice setting will be refined and assessed. [Offered: W, S]

PHARM 460 – Leadership in Pharmacy

This course focuses on application of leadership principles, human, organizational and motivational behaviour, and power relationships in the healthcare workplace. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 461 – Advanced Patient Safety

This course focuses on applying the Canadian Patient Safety Institute's domains to projects with community partners and local health care agencies. Students will learn to develop strategies to integrate medication safety updates and implement recommendations into their practices. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 462 – Interprofessional Case Management

This course focuses on developing the enhanced communication and teamwork skills necessary for working in interprofessional teams to optimize patient care. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 464 – Advanced Therapeutic Concepts in Oncology

This course examines advanced oncology therapeutic concepts required as foundation for patient management in the inpatient, ambulatory, and community settings. Topics include a comprehensive review of cancer epidemiology and pathophysiology, therapeutic agents used in the oncology setting, management of cancer therapy toxicities, and treatment and palliation of cancer symptoms. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 465 – Critical Care & Emergency Medicine for Pharmacists

This course focuses on the types of care provided by interdisciplinary health team members involved in caring for critical care and emergency room patients. Invited respiratory therapists, nurses, dieticians, pharmacists, social workers and intensivists will discuss critical care topics such as sepsis, respiratory insufficiency, toxicology, ethical deliberations and end of life care. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 466 – Advanced Geriatric Care

This course focuses on key concepts of ageing that are related to geriatric pharmacotherapy. Topics include: the biology and demography of ageing, optimal medication use in older people, disease presentation, geriatric assessment, roles for pharmacists and challenges and complexity of geriatric care. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 467 – Management of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to effectively and safely manage oral anticoagulation therapy under a medical directive. It contains both an online, self-paced learning module and computer simulated patient interactions that are designed to recreate the experience of practicing in an anticoagulation clinic. [Offered: W, F]

PHARM 468 – Clinical Neurology in Family Practice

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply clinical knowledge and skills to manage pharmacotherapy problems in patients with neurological disorders. It will contain an online, self-directed learning module (with a focus on patient assessment, obtaining pertinent patient history, assessment of drug-related problems and review of drugs used in neurological disorders) and an experiential mini-clinical rotation comprised of visits to a neurology as well as to a pain clinic. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 469 – Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacy Practice

The course aims to promote an enhanced understanding of conceptual and methodological issues essential for effective critical appraisal of the relevant clinical literature and ultimately, improved patient care. Key topics to be covered will include: basic concepts of epidemiology; data sources and measures, study design and methodological issues in pharmacoepidemiology; and, applications relevant to population-based research and pharmacy. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 470 – Advanced Medical Writing

This course will refine students' writing skills. Students will have opportunities to produce a variety of different documents with a focus on preparing documents suitable for publication. Topics will include audience analysis, modification of content to conform to the requirements of different journals, succinct and clear representation of data and study findings, coordinating the editing process with multiple authors etc. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 471 – Selected Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

Students will develop their understanding of physiochemical properties, drug design and pharmacological actions. A series of case studies on clinical drugs will be presented with major emphasis on their design, synthesis, reaction mechanisms and structure-activity relationship studies. A section of the course will address the pathophysiology and pharmacology of diseases affecting the central nervous system. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 472 – Community Practice in a Changing Environment

This course will prepare pharmacy students to provide services in an advanced community pharmacy practice environment. Students will explore, critique and develop innovative clinical services for the community setting. Students will also develop change management and critical thinking skills. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 473 – Advanced Infectious Disease

This course is designed to expand upon students' understanding of infectious disease pharmacotherapy, with a focus on syndromes requiring a higher degree of medical intervention than commonly seen in primary care. The aim of the course is to develop practicing pharmacists with the knowledge, skills and critical dispositions necessary for optimizing the use of anti-infectives in challenging infectious syndromes. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 474 – Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics in the Hospital Setting

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply clinical knowledge and skills to manage pharmacotherapy problems commonly encountered in hospitalized patients. The focus will be on disease states not covered in the Integrated Patient Focused Care Series. Additionally, problems unique to delivery of care in the hospital setting, such as formulary management, utilization review, and medication problems relating to transitions among care settings will be explored. [W, S, F]

PHARM 475 – Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics in the Ambulatory Care Setting

This course will provide students the opportunity to apply clinical knowledge and skills to manage pharmacotherapy problems commonly encountered by pharmacists practicing in an outpatient environment. The focus will be on disease states not covered in the Integrated Patient Focused Care Series. Additionally, problems unique to delivery of care in the ambulatory setting, such as coordination of care within an interdisciplinary team, working within the constraints of the Ontario Drug Benefit (ODB) program and insurance plan formularies, and provision of best practice care with limited resources. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 476 – Advanced Skills in Patient Engagement

Research shows that patients actively involved in managing their health report better outcomes. This course is an innovative skills-based program that combines theory and practical techniques to help learners develop the ability to assess readiness, motivate, and support patients in improving their health. Relevant clinical tools will be introduced along with opportunities for hands-on practice. [W, S, F]

PHARM 490 – Seminars in Pharmacy 2

This course entails a weekly seminar on topics in Pharmacy. The range of materials to be presented include current issues, special topics demonstrating new trends in patient care and treatment, competing perspectives in the pharmaceutical arena, and scopes of Pharmacy practice.

PHARM 491 – Seminars in Pharmacy 3

Through the Seminar Series of courses students are exposed to a number of speakers who address relevant topics within a content area. Speakers may include subject-matter experts, patients, and health care professionals.

PHARM 495 – Advanced Topics in Patient Focused Care

Update to the Integrated Patient Focused Care course series taken in the BSc Pharmacy curriculum. Focus on management of complex patients, application of clinical pharmacokinetics and evidence-based advancements in pharmacotherapeutics. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 496 – Advanced Professional Practice

Update to the Professional Practice course series taken in the BSc Pharmacy curriculum. Focus on skills necessary to incorporate changes in the scope of pharmacy practice into a variety of practice settings. This is predominantly an online course with required attendance at a workshop component. [Offered: W, S, F]

PHARM 497 – Clinical Rotation 1: Direct Patient Care Fundamentals

Advanced practice rotation in an approved clinical practice setting. Involves patient case workups; defence and demonstration of knowledge and application of patient care principles. Submission of a clinical experience portfolio. [Offered W, S, F]

PHARM 498 – Clinical Rotation 2: Direct Patient Care

Advanced practice rotation (8 weeks) in an approved clinical practice setting (institutional or primary care, depending on prior experience assessed through PHARM 497). Provision of direct patient care in an inter-professional setting. [Offered W, S, F]

PHARM 499 – Clinical Rotation 3: Elective

Advanced practice rotation (8 weeks) in an approved clinical practice setting. Provision of direct patient care in an inter-professional setting distinct from previous experience assessed through the clinical experience portfolio and courses taken since completing the BSc Pharm. [Offered W, S, F]

PHARM 601 – MSc Thesis Proposal

The objective of Pharm 601 are to encourage graduate students in the MSc Pharmacy program to best prepare and present their research objectives in written and oral form. In addition to the writing and defence of the Thesis proposal, each student will be required to: a. Attend and complete a scientific writing workshop (90 min class time) that will provide background on literature searching, citation and proper management of references as part of preparation of the Thesis Proposal, and participate in a one-on-one appointment with the Pharmacy liaison librarian to discuss research strategies and reinforce academic integrity. The workshop and appointments will be offered each term by the Pharmacy liaison librarian. b. Attend two Thesis Proposal defences by other students, prior to the students own oral defence. This course is only available for the first Thesis Proposal taken within the Pharmacy Program. If a student is required to fulfill a second Thesis Proposal (for example, if being reassessed for transfer to the PhD) no additional course credit is available. The Thesis Proposal component involves the preparation of a written research proposal and oral defence of the proposal. The intent is to learn how to use the literature to stimulate in-depth thinking about the basis of their thesis research project and to encourage development of their scientific oral presentation skills. The thesis proposal should outline the reasons for undertaking the project, concisely survey the relevant literature, present a detailed description of the methodology to be used and outline any preliminary results acquired at the time of the proposal. The written proposal will be considered by an examination committee that will normally comprise the students Advisory Committee plus an independent Chair who will assume that role for all thesis proposals within one academic term. The full Examination Committee will independently grade the written proposal, and separately assign a grade to the oral defence. The simple average of those scores (two per committee member) will be the students grade for the course.

PHARM 602 – Grant Writing in the Sciences

The course is designed to teach the student how to critically review the literature, ask the right scientific questions, generate hypotheses, and write a professional curriculum vita and a fundable grant proposal. The course will include lectures from the instructor and guest speakers, small group discussion, student presentations and a final written grant proposal.

PHARM 603 – Selected Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

This course provides an introduction to basic principles in medical chemistry such as physiochemical properties, drug design and pharmacological actions. A brief overview of the theory and application of computer aided drug design principles will provide a basic understanding of the "in silico" drug design concepts. The student will develop an understanding toward the concepts of peptide/petidomimetic design as therapeutic agents. A series of case studies on clinical drugs will be presented with major emphasis on their design, synthesis, reaction mechanisms and structure-activity relationship studies. A section of the course will address the pathophysiology and pharmacology of diseases affecting the central nervous system. In addition, learning activities and assignments include a term paper submission and in class presentation of current topics in medicinal chemistry.

PHARM 604 – Gene Therapy

Gene therapy offers extraordinary potential to treat both inherited and acquired diseases by using the body's own machinery to produce a therapeutic compound or protein, or up-regulate/down-regulate specific cellular processes. This course will examine the various extra- and intracellular barriers to DNA transfection, and the common vectors used in gene therapy. Various routes of administration, such as injected, inhaled, and transdermal will be discussed in terms of their challengers, and the successes of recent formulations described in the literature.

PHARM 605 – Physical Chemistry and Application of Surfactants

Surface active compounds, more commonly known as surfactants are found in nearly every aspect of day to day life, including motor oils, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, detergents, and paints and inks to name a few. This course will introduce the student to the structures of classical and emerging classes of surfactants and their fundamental properties that make these systems so useful. The self-assembly of these compounds into micelles will be discussed in detail using both thermodynamic and kinetic modules and modern methods of characterizing these systems will be examined. The application of surfactants in a variety of industries will be introduced. The capstone activity of this course will entail a critical analysis of a relevant recent journal article, and presentation to the class.

PHARM 606 – Neuroscience in the 21st Century

Intensively examines medical and technological advances in neuroscience. Students will first develop a deep understanding of the structure and function of the central nervous system, neuronal cell biology and physiology, and neurotransmission. Explores selected CNS disease states and identify mechanisms of neuropathology by biological, environmental, and iatrogenic causes. Advances in technology and nanotechnology is and will continue to transform the treatment of diseases of the nervous system and these issues will be explored by expert guest lecturers.

PHARM 607 – Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis

This course provides an introduction to modern spectroscopic methods with emphasis on pharmaceutical analysis. First few lectures will cover the theory and application of UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy. A review of NMR spectroscopy will focus on commonly used techniques such as 1H NMR and 13C NMR and their application. The student will get a practical experience in spectroscopic methods for structural elucidation by using UVS-VIS, IR and NMR spectrometers. In addition, a section will address the theory and application of mass spectrometry. Examples of drug molecules/pharmaceuticals and their spectroscopic characteristics will be discussed. In addition, learning activities and assignments include problem sets and structural elucidation of an unknown organic molecule.

PHARM 608A – Selected Topics in Pharmaceutical Sciences 1

This course will discuss specialized topics that are related to the research interests of faculty members in the field of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Topics could include, for example, the areas of drug delivery systems, diabetes, bacteriophage derived therapeutics, central nervous disorders, medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetics, biophysical methods, bionanotechnology, nanomedicine among others. This course may be presented in any of the following formats, reading based, lecture based, project based or online learning.

PHARM 609 – Advanced Pharmacokinetics

This course provides statistical hands-on knowledge for the implementation of nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) models in the analysis of population pharmacokinetic data. In order to provide a foundation for NLME, the content builds from simple to multiple linear regression models and to linear mixed effects models. Exploratory and descriptive analyses as well as model implementation will be taught in R and Phoenix.

PHARM 610 – Topics in Drug Development

This course will cover all aspects of drug development, from basic research through to post-marketing surveillance of drug safety and efficacy. Faculty members from the UW School of Pharmacy and beyond will provide their expertise on aspects of the drug development process. Students will gain valuable knowledge and appreciation of the drug development process from "bench to bedside". Using real-life drug research problems, students will learn how identification of disease stat pathophysiology directs drug design, how medicinal chemistry optimizes lead molecule creation, how drug dosage forms are designed, pharmacokinetic studies, how animal models are used to test the efficacy and toxicity of lead compounds, the design and evaluation of clinical trials, drug manufacturing, perspectives from the pharmaceutical industry, as well as business and regulatory issues.

PHARM 611 – Special Topics in Pharmacy Practice

This course will discuss specialized topics that are of mutual interest to the research of faculty members and graduate students in the field of Pharmacy Practice. Topics could include, for example, pharmacy education; rural pharmacy practice; geriatrics and aging; pharmacoepidemiology; the role of technology in primary care; chronic disease management; expanded scope of practice; collaborative practice in different settings; health services design and care delivery; among others. This course may be presented in any of the following formats, reading based, lecture based, project based, or online learning.

PHARM 612 – Principles and Practices in Systemic Treatments for Cancer

This course is designed to accommodate graduate students from a variety of backgrounds who wish to increase their understanding of cancer and its treatment. It will cover the full range of issues involved in the rational use of anti-cancer agents, from the older cytotoxic drugs through to newer agents targeted at particular steps in cell regulatory pathways. A broad overview of the pathology of cancer is included. Although drug mechanisms will be addressed, there is an equivalent emphasis on what these drugs mean to the patient. Students ill consider the disease itself, the behavior of the diagnosed patient, the issues around drug administration, the extensive side effects and the various supportive strategies that are required to take the patient through the very stressful course of systemic cancer therapy.

PHARM 613 – Principles and Practices in Systemic Treatments for Cancer

This course is designed to accommodate graduate students from a variety of backgrounds who wish to increase their understanding of cancer and its treatment. It will cover the full range of issues involved in the rational use of anti-cancer agents, from the older cytotoxic drugs through to newer agents targeted at particular steps in cell regulatory pathways. A broad overview of the pathology of cancer is included. Although drug mechanisms will be addressed, there is an equivalent emphasis on what these drugs mean to the patient. Students will consider the disease itself, the behavior of the diagnosed patient, the issues around drug administration, the extensive side effects and the various supportive strategies that are required to take the patient through the very stressful course of systemic cancer therapy.

PHARM 614 – Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

This course will provide students with an overview of the rationale and stages involved in the conduct of a formal systematic review and meta-analysis of a well-defined clinical/health research question. The overarching aim is to provide students with the tools to critically appraise and conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis. Students will largely work in pairs to progress through each step involved (with feedback from instructors at each stage) and to produce a final systematic review and meta-analysis to be presented/submitted at the end of the course. Course Objectives: 1. To demonstrate an understanding of the rationale underlying a systematic review and meta-analysis and relevance to clinical care and health policy; 2. To critically appraise a systematic review; 3. To develop a focused research question amenable to a systematic review; 4. To develop and implement a comprehensive and systematic literature search strategy; 5. To determine and apply procedures for including/excluding potential studies for a systematic review and meta-analysis; 6. To develop and implement a data abstraction process and study database; 7. To demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental statistical/biostatistical issues relevant to the conduct of a formal systematic review and meta-analysis. 8. To perform statistical analyses for a systematic review and meta-analysis and complete/present a final report demonstrating all stages involved. Students will need to meet with Course Coordinators and provide of appropriate previous experience with linear and/or logistic regression techniques.

PHARM 615 – Strategic Management of Biopharmaceutical Technology

The strategic development and commercialization of novel and incremental bio/pharma technological innovation is rapidly expanding across all industries and with it comes the need for adept management of the process. Effective management involves ensuring technological precaution such that the risks and ambiguities associated with advanced technologies are minimized. Additionally, management must be strategic to maximize the successful achievement of corporate objectives based on the alignment of internal resources with the external environment. The transfer of technology from lab to market and successful propagation is usually impeded by a lack of cohesion between scientific understanding and business adeptness. This course also serves to analyse and connect scientific principles underlying novel and incremental technologies with strategic management and the commercialization process from an entrepreneurial perspective.

PHARM 616 – PhD Thesis Proposal

The objective of Pharm 616 are to encourage graduate students in the PhD Pharmacy program to best prepare and present their research objectives in written and oral form. In addition to the writing and defence of the Thesis proposal, each student will be required to: a. Attend and complete a scientific writing workshop (90 min class time) that will provide background on literature searching, citation and proper management of references as part of preparation of the Thesis Proposal, and participate in a one-on-one appointment with the Pharmacy liaison librarian to discuss research strategies and reinforce academic integrity. The workshop and appointments will be offered each term by the Pharmacy liaison librarian. b. Attend two Thesis Proposal defences by other students, prior to the students own oral defence. This course is only available for the first Thesis Proposal taken within the Pharmacy Program. If a student is required to fulfill a second Thesis Proposal (for example, if being assessed for internal transfer from the MSc to PhD program) no additional course credit is available. The Thesis Proposal component involves the preparation of a written research proposal and oral defence of the proposal. The intent is to learn how to use the literature to stimulate in-depth thinking about the basis of their thesis research project and to encourage development of their scientific oral presentation skills. The thesis proposal should outline the reasons for undertaking the project, concisely survey the relevant literature, present a detailed description of the methodology to be used and outline any preliminary results acquired at the time of the proposal. The written proposal will be considered by an examination committee that will normally comprise the students Advisory Committee plus an independent Chair who will assume that role for all thesis proposals within one academic term. The full Examination Committee will independently grade the written proposal, and separately assign a grade to the oral defence. The simple average of those scores (two per committee member) will be the students grade for the course.

PHARM 617 – Formulations

The formulation of chemicals into products for specific purposes dates back to the stone age. Formulated products are now part of everyday life and include pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, personal care products, detergents, agricultural products, etc. This course will examine the chemical formulation of various consumer products with an emphasis on pharmaceutical formulations; major components used in formulations, surface chemistry, and molecular interactions will be discussed. Analytical methods for testing formulations, raw materials, and environmental and sustainability considerations will also be discussed.