Zachary Seguin

LAT Courses

LAT 101 – Introductory Latin 1

A course designed for students beginning the study of Latin or who have not yet reached the level expected in LAT 201/202. Although the teaching approach emphasizes exposure to simple texts as soon as possible, students desiring minimal competence in reading should go on to do LAT 102.

LAT 102 – Introductory Latin 2

Continuation of LAT 101. Most of the rules of Latin grammar will be covered by the end of the year, and students should have a minimal competence in reading prose texts; but for the remaining grammar and further practice students should go on to do LAT 201.

LAT 201 – Intermediate Latin

The course will complete the study of Latin grammar and move on to unadapted readings in Latin authors, particularly Caesar.

LAT 202 – Selections from Latin Authors

A course designed to follow LAT 201, including both literature and grammar review. Authors normally read are Vergil and Ovid.

LAT 202W – Selections from Latin Authors

A course designed to follow LAT 201, including both literature and grammar review. Authors normally read are Vergil and Ovid.

LAT 331 – Advanced Readings in Latin: Prose

A selection of material from one author or several authors within the field of Latin prose. Topics and selections may include oratory and rhetoric, history, philosophy, Cicero, Quintilian, Caesar, Livy, and Apuleius.

LAT 332 – Advanced Readings in Latin: Poetry

A selection of material from one author or several authors within the field of Latin poetry. Topics and selections may include comedy, lyric poetry, elegy, epic, Plautus, Terence, Catullus, Ovid and Vergil.

LAT 341 – Advanced Studies in Latin: Selected Topics

An investigation of selected themes, topics, time periods or genres in Latin.

LAT 351 – Latin Composition, Grammar and Reading

Composition, translation and grammar with intensive analysis of selected passages.

LAT 381 – Medieval Latin

Survey of Medieval Latin poetry and prose.

LAT 421 – Latin Epigraphy

The course introduces and investigates Latin inscriptions as evidence for the Latin language and Roman political, religious, legal, social and economic history.

LAT 422 – Latin Palaeography

A practical overview of the various styles of Latin handwriting from the late Roman Empire to the writing styles of the Renaissance humanists which introduces students to the study of original documents and manuscripts.

LAT 451 – Senior Latin Composition, Grammar and Reading

Advanced composition, translation, and grammar with intensive analysis of selected passages.

LAT 490 – Senior Studies in Latin: Selected Topics

A selection of material from one author or several authors or an investigation of selected themes, topics or genres at the senior level. Topics and authors may include philosophy, letter writing, history, elegy, satire, Seneca, Pliny the Younger, Tacitus, Propertius, Petronius and Juvenal.

LAT 491 – Senior Studies in Latin: Independent Study

Under special circumstances and with the approval of the Department, a student or small group of students may arrange to pursue individualized readings under the supervision of a faculty member.

LAT 600 – Topics in Latin Language

This course will involve the reading of original material in Latin with a focus on the advanced study of the language itself, although topics may vary from single authors to literary genres to chronological periods. This course is repeatable provided the topic is different. Examples could include: Latin Palaeography; Augustan Poetry; Epic Poetry; Advanced Grammar, Reading, and Composition; Greek and Roman Identities in the Lyric Poetry of Horace; Latin Epigraphy; or Medieval Latin.

LAT 601 – Topics in Greek Language

0.25 credit offering to be combined with LAT 601. This 0.25 credit version of GRK 600 will allow faculty members to offer single-term courses that combine reading of original sources in both ancient Greek and Latin on selected topics. This course is repeatable provided the topic is different. Examples could include: Greek Palaeography or Greek Epigraphy.

LAT 621 – Latin Epigraphy

The course introduces and investigates Latin inscriptions as evidence for the Latin language and Roman political, religious, legal, social and economic history.

LAT 622 – Latin Palaeography

This class will involve the study of Latin scripts from Antiquity through the Middle Ages with a view to providing students with the practical skills necessary for reading unpublished Latin texts prior to the Renaissance. The class will allow students to become conversant with the various types of Latin script as well as practice the accurate transcription of Latin texts. A field trip to libraries in Toronto for hands-on experience with primary material will be organized as part of the class.

LAT 633 – Greek and Roman Identities in the Lyric Poetry of Horace

This course investigates the representation of Greek (and other) culture in the Odes of Horace. We shall examine how the Roman perception of earlier and contemporary Greek cultural values is manipulated in Horace's poetry in order to articulate the nature of his lyric poetry, as well as social, political, and aesthetic values. By careful consideration of a wide range of poems, and by comparing them to the Greek models of Pindar, Sappho, Alcaeus, and Archilochus, we shall determine Horace's representation of the unique as well as derivative characteristic of Augustan society and literature.

LAT 635 – Studies in Tacitus Annals I-VI

Tacitus Annals I-VI provide a fascinating insight into how the most famous of Latin historians viewed the early years of the Roman Empire. On the way, Tacitus' descriptions of members of the imperial family, Roman commanders, barbarian chieftains, eastern kings, and even the self-serving Senate are drawn with firm strokes and a superbly concentrated economy.

LAT 651 – Senior Latin Composition, Grammar and Reading

Advanced composition, translation and grammar with intensive analysis of selected passages.

LAT 691 – Special Topics

A selection of material from one author or several authors or investigation of selected themes, topics, genres at the graduate level.