Zachary Seguin

KIN Courses

KIN 1 – Discussion of Behavioural Issues

This is a discussion course

KIN 10 – Ergonomics Option Seminar

A seminar for students to present and discuss ergonomic issues regarding their previous semester's work term and to participate in debate of ergonomic issues

KIN 100 – Human Anatomy: Limbs and Trunk

Functionally-oriented regional anatomy of the limbs and trunk. A brief introduction to neuroanatomy is included.

KIN 100L – Human Anatomy Lab

Regional gross anatomy of the limbs and back (and the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, briefly) is examined using pre-dissected human cadavers. For the limbs and back, emphasis is placed on structures (muscles, nerves, and bones) involved in movement at the joints.

KIN 101 – Biophysical Evaluation Lab

This lab provides exposure to practical measurement skills in the tests measuring cardiovascular function, neuromuscular function and body composition. Note: Labs offered alternate weeks.

KIN 104 – Fundamentals of Kinesiology

An introduction to the issues and approaches used in kinesiology. Presentation of case studies will illustrate the foundational knowledge and procedures used by kinesiologists. Emphasis will be placed on practical skills, critical analysis, problem solving, and the integration of knowledge across the breadth of kinesiology.

KIN 104L – Fundamentals of Kinesiology Lab

This lab provides exposure to practical measurement skills in the tests measuring cardiovascular function, neuromuscular function and body composition. Note: Labs offered alternate weeks.

KIN 105 – Cardiovascular and Respiratory Responses to Exercise

The basic concepts of cardiovascular, respiratory and thermoregulatory responses to physical activity will be examined and applied to situations encountered in daily life including recreational activities, sport, and the workplace.

KIN 107 – Sociology of Activity, Health, and Well-being

This course will focus on the social and cultural factors that influence leisure, activity, health and well-being in different settings and among different populations. Sociological literature will be used to examine activity, health, and well-being in the lives of individuals, groups, and society.

KIN 121 – Biomechanics of Human Activity

Understanding human activity from a mechanical perspective prepares the student to address major issues which include reducing the risk of injury, optimizing exercise prescription, and understanding clinical evaluations. Specifically, concepts related to functional anatomy, muscle and passive tissue mechanics, anthropometry, electromyography, and linked segment mechanics are introduced and applied to clinical, occupational and athletic situations.

KIN 121L – Biomechanics of Human Activity Lab

This laboratory course provides student with some of the practical tools used to assess human activity from a biomechanical perspective. The labs have been designed to assist with your knowledge and understanding of material discussed in the KIN 121 lectures. Note: Labs are offered alternate weeks.

KIN 140L – Sport Injury Management Lab

This lab provides exposure and training in the management of injuries in an athletic population. Techniques include musculoskeletal assessment, emergency treatment, taping and splinting supports, heating, icing, stretching, and fitting protective equipment. Current first aid and CPR certification required.

KIN 146 – Introduction to Human Nutrition

An introductory course on human nutrition. Students will be introduced to core topics in nutrition including function of nutrients, nutrient requirements, diet assessment and planning, food composition and the complex interrelationships between food, nutrition, and health. Factors that affect the human diet such as biology, psychology, sociology, environment and political policy will also be examined, as well as key areas of nutrition focus for life stage groups.

KIN 155 – Introduction to Neuroscience for Kinesiology

An introduction to the principles of the nervous system control of movement, cognition and learning. The course will introduce the basic structure and function of the nervous system as it relates to understanding the control of movement and behaviour. The course will provide a foundation for understanding the neural mechanisms of learning, recovery from injury to the nervous system and the factors that determine skilled performance.

KIN 202 – Physiological and Metabolic Responses and Adaptations to Exercise

This course is designed to provide students with a molecular, cellular and systems level understanding of the physiological and metabolic responses to different types and intensities of exercise. Physiological and metabolic adaptations to different types of chronic exercise, such as endurance, high-intensity interval and resistance training, will also be examined.

KIN 202L – Physiological and Metabolic Responses and Adaptations to Exercise Lab

This laboratory course provides students with some of the practical tools used to assess the integrated physiological and metabolic response of the body to exercise. The labs have been designed to assist with your knowledge and understanding of material discussed in the KIN 202 lectures. Note: Labs are offered alternate weeks.

KIN 204 – Movement Assessment and Exercise Prescription

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of movement competency and performance enhancement of apparently healthy individuals. The breadth of tests and assessment tools to determine capabilities with respect to mobility, movement patterns, physical activity, fitness and lifestyle will be covered in detail and practiced and applied in a weekly laboratory.

KIN 204L – Movement and Exercise Prescription Lab

This laboratory course provides student with some of the practical tools used in movement and exercise prescription assessment. The labs have been designed to assist with your knowledge and understanding of material discussed in the KIN 204 lectures.

KIN 205 – Muscle Physiology in Exercise and Work

This course examines the structure and composition of the muscle cell and the differences between cells which provide for a diversity of function during activity. Particular attention is also given to the motor nerve and muscle cell type interactions and the applied aspects of energy supply and utilization. Note: Labs offered alternate weeks.

KIN 210 – Development, Aging and Health

The physiology of human growth, development and aging is examined, with special reference to the influence of diet, environment, exercise and disease on the normal processes.

KIN 217 – Human Biochemistry

An elementary course in human biochemistry including the metabolism and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymatic function, energy metabolism, and introductory genetics. Emphasis is placed on clinical and medical applications.

KIN 221 – Advanced Biomechanics of Human Movement

The course is structured to introduce measurement, analytical and computation techniques involving multisegmental, dynamic analysis of human activity. Examples of human activity in occupational, clinical and leisure settings from the perspectives of anthropometry, kinematics, kinetics, energetics, muscle mechanics and electromyography are given. The utility of biomechanical variables in the solution of questions involving human activity is emphasized using lectures and laboratories. Note: Labs offered alternate weeks.

KIN 221L – Advanced Biomechanics of Human Movement Lab

This laboratory course provides students with some of the practical tools used to assess human activity from a biomechanics perspective. The labs have been designed to assist with your knowledge and understanding of material discussed in the KIN 221 lectures. Note: Labs are offered alternate weeks.

KIN 222 – Statistical Techniques Applied to Kinesiology

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics and the interpretation of data. A major consideration of the course is the use of statistics in the solution of problems in Kinesiology and Health Studies.

KIN 232 – Research Design and Statistics in Kinesiology

An introduction to research design and statistics and its application to Kinesiology and clinical health practice. A major focus is identifying appropriate research methods (including study design, sampling, measurement, and statistical analysis) for a given research question.

KIN 242 – Introduction to Movement Disorders

An introduction to selected movement disorders and their implications for physical activity. The movement disorders examined include those which accompany neuromuscular and perceptual-motor impairment, mental retardation, cardio-vascular and respiratory disease.

KIN 250 – Sociology of Physical Activity

An introduction to the sociology of physical activity. The course examines physical activity with respect to settings such as the workplace, educational and health systems, exercise, and sport. Particular attention is directed to a consideration of the social significance of physical activity and the social influences and constraints upon access and participation.

KIN 255 – Fundamentals of Neuroscience

An introduction to the principles of the nervous system control of movement, cognition and learning. The course will introduce the basic structure and function of the nervous system as it relates to understanding the control of movement and behaviour. The course will provide a foundation for understanding the neural mechanisms of learning, recovery from injury to the nervous system and the factors that determine skilled performance.

KIN 255L – Fundamentals of Neuroscience Lab

This laboratory course provides students with some of the practical tools to assess the nervous system control of movement, cognition and learning. The labs have been designed to assist with your knowledge and understanding of material discussed in the KIN 255 lectures. Note: Labs are offered alternate weeks.

KIN 301 – Human Anatomy of the Central Nervous System

Functionally-oriented anatomy of the brain, spinal cord, cranial nerves and the tissues they innervate using predissected cadavers. This course complements other behavioural neuroscience courses including KIN 242, 357, 415, 416, 456 and PSYCH 261, 307, 396.

KIN 307 – Methods in Physiological Research

An introduction to biochemical and physiological methods used by physiologists in clinical and physiological assessment including, but not restricted to: spectophometric and fluorometric techniques, tissue and blood sampling, cell culture techniques, DNA separation and staining. Western blotting, chromatography, cardiovascular imaging and body composition imaging and analysis. Course consists of lecture and laboratory to deliver both the theoretical and practical aspects of these analytical techniques.

KIN 310 – Development, Aging and Health

The physiology of human growth, development and aging is examined, with special reference to the influence of diet, environment, exercise and disease on the normal processes.

KIN 320 – Task Analysis

Task analysis is used to describe and analyze the activities of people in settings such as work, leisure and activities of daily living. There is a range of techniques developed in engineering, ergonomics and psychology to suit the investigator's purpose and setting. This course allows students to become familiar with a wide range of techniques and use them in a variety of settings. Approximately one technique will be addressed each week in a combined lecture/tutorial setting. Presentations by students are an integral part of the courses.

KIN 330 – Research Design

An introduction to the basic principles of scientific inquiry in Kinesiology. A systematic treatment of the logic and practice of methods and techniques employed in research related to physical activity with an examination of design, sampling, data gathering and analysis.

KIN 332 – Research Design and Statistics in Kinesiology

An introduction to research design and statistics and its application to Kinesiology and clinical health practice. A major focus is identifying appropriate research methods (including study design, sampling, measurement, and statistical analysis) for a given research question.

KIN 340 – Musculoskeletal Injuries in Work and Sport

A course in the area of sports medicine in which injuries encountered in sport and in the workplace are examined. Materials covered include the mechanisms of injury, tissue biomechanics, pathology, assessment, treatment and prevention of acute and chronic trauma.

KIN 341 – Selected Topics in Sport and Work Injuries

This course covers the mechanisms, pathology, management and prevention of catastrophic injuries encountered in sport and work. Topics include trauma to the head, face, vertebral column, and knee, thermal injury, legal liability and others as requested by the students.

KIN 342 – Nutrition and Aging

This course provides an overview of the nutrition and food-related issues, recommendations and best practices for older adults throughout the continuum of care (community to long term care). Determinants of food intake are a focus with specific consideration given to eating environment, psychosocial and physiological changes that influence access, preparation, and consumption of food. An emphasis will be placed on chronic disease prevention and management of nutrition issues and challenges throughout the continuum of care.

KIN 343 – Micronutrient Metabolism

This course examines the metabolism of vitamins and minerals in the context of normal human development and aging with an emphasis on disease prevention and understanding the pathogenesis of deficiencies and toxicities. The function and role of vitamins and minerals will be discussed in specific groupings.

KIN 346 – Human Nutrition and Metabolism

An overview of nutrient metabolism will be presented with emphasis on diet for the prevention of disease, and maintaining health. An examination of the impact of nutrition on exercise and body composition will also be included.

KIN 348 – Social Psychology of Health Behaviour

The study and application of basic social psychological processes in relation to selected health-related behaviours (e.g. family planning, overeating, smoking, non-medical drug use, cardiovascular risk factors, patient compliance, medical care utilization).

KIN 349 – Health Behaviour Change

The course will focus on the prevention of chronic disease through individual and population health behaviour change. Topics covered will include basic learning principles of behaviour, behaviour modification techniques, intrapersonal and interpersonal theories of behaviour change, motivation, and the role of policy in behaviour change. Application of principles will be examined using primary and secondary prevention trials and worksite health promotion programs.

KIN 352 – Sociology of Aging

An introduction to individual and population aging. Topics discussed include: aging from a historical and comparative perspective; aging in subcultures; aging and the social structure; aging and social processes; aging and the environment; work and retirement; and aging and leisure patterns.

KIN 354 – Psychology of Physical Activity

A comprehensive survey of psychological factors implicated in physical activity performance. Topics include social cognitive theories of physical activity behaviour, perception and sport performance, exercise training and brain function, exercise as a treatment modality for psychiatric conditions, and urban design as a means of physical activity promotion.

KIN 356 – Information Processing in Human Perceptual Motor Performance

An information processing model of perceptual-motor behaviour is presented. Human performance theory is used to study processes mediating input and output information. Specifically, the subprocesses of storage of information in memory, perception, retrieval of information from memory and execution of movement are examined.

KIN 357 – Motor Learning

A course focused on the bases and applications of theories of motor learning. Included are selected psychological and neurophysiological processes as they relate to these theories.

KIN 372 – International Exchange

Study abroad on an Exchange Agreement approved by the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences.

KIN 391 – Research Apprenticeship

This course provides an opportunity to learn how research is done by working in the research program of a faculty member. The apprenticeship involves unpaid participation for no more than 6-8 hours per week for at least 12 weeks of the term. Detailed requirements and application forms for this course are available at the Kinesiology Undergraduate Office. A student may enrol only once in KIN 391. This course is graded as credit/no credit.

KIN 402 – Microgravity, Hypo- and Hyperbaric Physiology

An examination of human cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses at rest and during work in altered gravitational and barometric environments.

KIN 403 – Occupational and Environmental Physiology

An analysis of the physiological demands of work place and recreational tasks under various environmental conditions. The course will examine how an individual's physiological potential might be influenced by the environment and specific task demands with implications for fatigue and/or injury.

KIN 404 – Physiological Basis of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

This course will examine the environmental and physiological aspects of obesity and Type 2 Diabetes with emphasis on the molecular pathways involved in energy balance regulation. Topics to be covered include epidemiology of obesity and Type 2 Diabetes, regulation of energy intake (appetite), energy storage and energy expenditure, and the role of physical inactivity and activity in the causes and prevention of obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

KIN 405 – Exercise Management

An examination of the rationale and procedures used in the development of exercise programs for normally healthy individuals.

KIN 406 – Physiology of Muscle Aging and Disease

This course will examine the cellular and molecular adaptations that occur in skeletal muscle during aging and disease. Topics to be covered include skeletal muscle satellite cells/stem cells, apoptosis and necrosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation. The influence of physical activity on these biological processes and in the prevention and treatment of skeletal disorders will also be discussed.

KIN 407 – Coronary Artery Disease - Prevention and Rehabilitation

This course explores the pathophysiology, electrophysiology, risk factors, and assessment and rehabilitation options related to cardiovascular disease. Major emphasis is placed on the utility of exercise in the assessment and rehabilitation of primary and secondary cardiovascular disease.

KIN 408 – Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology

This course will provide an advanced understanding of heart and blood vessel physiology in normal health, and in cardiovascular disease conditions including hypertension, heart failure, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. This will include examination of mechanisms underlying lifestyle and medical/ pharmacological management of these conditions from both prevention and treatment perspectives. The influence of physical activity on heart and blood vessel physiology and pathophysiology will be emphasized. Contemporary research elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling heart and blood vessel function in health and disease will be discussed.

KIN 414 – Cases in Clinical Exercise Physiology

Using cases, assignments, guest lecturers and reading to guide discussion and learning, students will learn how impairments or secondary complications associated with chronic conditions influence decision-making in clinical exercise physiology.

KIN 415 – Clinical Neurophysiology: Fundamentals for Rehabilitation of Human Movement

This course explores current clinical neurophysiological concepts important for the control of human movement as well as current techniques used in clinical neurophysiology. Emphasis is placed on the neurophysiology underlying human movement pathologies and the application of this understanding to rehabilitation following injury to the central nervous system.

KIN 416 – Neuromuscular Integration

An examination of the neural processes involved in the maintenance of posture and the control of movement.

KIN 418 – Age-Related Physical and Mental Changes and Effect of Exercise on Improving Health in the Aged

This course is designed to provide the students with the knowledge that enables them to distinguish between normal and abnormal aging; to understand the implications of exercise in health and disease; to help the students understand the different physical and mental conditions they may experience while working with an older person; and to be prepared to meet the challenges associated with an increasing older population by developing knowledgeable professionals in the field of aging.

KIN 420 – Occupational Biomechanics

A course designed to provide the student with knowledge to reduce the risk of injury and increase worker productivity. Issues include identification of injury risk factors, understanding injury mechanism, quantitative assessment of injury risk and intervention strategies to reduce the risk of injury. Specific examples include the use of computerized models and EMG methods to analyze low back loading, optimizing tool design and workspace layout and the examination of related issues such as office seating and vibration.

KIN 422 – Human Gait, Posture, and Balance: Pathological and Aging Considerations

This course will provide a detailed understanding of the kinematics, kinetics, and neural control of standing posture, stepping, walking, and running under normal and perturbed conditions. Measurement techniques, processing data, and the interpretation of total body and limb synergies will be emphasized from a biomechanical and neural control perspective. The problems of the elderly and the assessment of those with pathologies will be emphasized.

KIN 425 – Biomechanical Modelling of Human Movement

The quantitative measurement and analysis of the movement of the human musculo skeletal system. Multisegment dynamic movements will be studied using computer programs, with emphasis on kinematics, kinetics and energetics, as well as the use of EMG in the assessment of the control of the movement. Examples are presented from pathological, normal and athletic movement.

KIN 427 – Low Back Disorders

An advanced elective undergraduate course that introduces the multidisciplinary issues (psychosocial, behavioural, physiological, motor control, biomechanical and legislative) related to low back disorders. A solid scientific foundation is developed from the study of anatomy, normal function and injury mechanics. This foundation is used to substantiate the best strategies for injury prevention and optimal rehabilitation for those with back troubles.

KIN 428 – Upper Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders: Prevention, Assessment, and Rehabilitation

This course introduces the multiple factors that mediate the initiation, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of disorders in the upper extremities. Beginning with a systematic review of hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder region functional anatomy, a knowledge base is developed to provide a means for the analysis of injury mechanisms. With this base developed, current prevention, clinical diagnosis and rehabilitation techniques for specific disorders will be examined, including carpal tunnel syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and lateral epicondylitis. Pathologies arising from occupational, sport, and daily living activities will be addressed.

KIN 429 – Bone and Joint Health

The overall aim is to provide a comprehensive understanding of human bone and cartilage in health and disease. Specific topics covered include: skeletal physiology, bone and cartilage growth and development, prevalence and etiology of several bone and joint conditions (e.g., osteoporosis, arthritis), clinical evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of bone and joint conditions, and the roles of nutrition and exercise in the prevention and treatment of bone and joint disease. The course will incorporate current issues, problem-based learning, research skills and student-led seminars in addition to the lecture-based framework.

KIN 431 – Research Proposal

An independent paper in the form of a research proposal on an approved topic. The topic may include survey, field, laboratory, theoretical, or applied research, program evaluation, mathematical modelling, fitness appraisal, etc. The format is to be determined with the supervisor and may be in chapters or in journal style.

KIN 432 – Research Project

An independent research project on an approved topic, supervised by a faculty member. This is the completion of the research proposed in KIN 431. The format is to be determined with the supervisor and may be in chapters or in journal style.

KIN 433 – Senior Essay

An extensive critical review of the literature on an approved topic. The topics will be broader in scope than those associated with specific research proposals.

KIN 440 – Sport Injury Management Seminar

This seminar reviews cases of injury management in an athletic population. Students each present a minimum of two cases, using appropriate research literature support and comparison of alternative management approaches and conclusions. Students applying for this seminar must provide an information sheet listing experiences in injury settings, related qualifications such as CPR and first aid, and marks in KIN 100, 100L, 340. Instructor consent required.

KIN 446 – Physiological and Biochemical Aspects of Nutrition and Health

Selected examples of nutrient metabolism will be examined in detail in regards to dietary intake, metabolism and mechanistic effects on human health. Comprehensive coverage of all nutrients is not intended, but rather the examples will be examined in detail with a focus on research techniques and approaches, and various factors that interact with and influence nutrition.

KIN 451 – Social Aspects of Injury in Work and Sport

This course will examine social aspects of injuries in the context of the workplace, sport and exercise settings. Topics to be covered include risk factors, health and safety climates, cultures of risk, injury prevention strategies, rehabilitation and return to work, and the role of the state in regard to health and safety legislation and insurance programs.

KIN 453 – Applied Sport Psychology

An examination of the psychology of sport with an applied focus. Topics include the psychology of peak performance, coaching, and team building, among others.

KIN 456 – Cognitive Dysfunction and Motor Skill

An examination of issues related to understanding the cerebral organization of motor skill. Discussion of how certain movement disorders are a reflection of disturbances at different stages in the sequence of information processing.

KIN 457 – Cognitive, Perceptual and Motor Assessment

This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to the principles underlying the assessment of cognitive, perceptual and motor functions. Measurement issues associated with test development and use, factors involved in the administration and interpretation of test results, and methods of report writing will be examined. Under the supervision of a Registered Psychologist, the student will learn to administer a number of test instruments used in the assessment of cognitive, perceptual and motor functions. Assessments will be done on normal, healthy volunteers recruited from the university community.

KIN 458 – Social Neuroscience and Health

This is an in-depth course intended for the intensive study of psychological, neuroscientific and social processes that together set the stage for the development of chronic illnesses in the modern world. Topics include exercise neuroscience, health-related decision processes, and neural responses to health risk communications in the media.

KIN 470 – Seminar in Kinesiology

An examination of current major issues and trends in Kinesiology. Students select areas of major interest from a series of faculty introduced topics.

KIN 470E – Seminar in Integrative Ergonomics

An examination of current major issues and trends in Ergonomics.

KIN 471 – Contemporary Issues in Kinesiology

One or more term courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the Kinesiology Department. Subjects will be dependent upon special research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

KIN 472 – Directed Study in Special Topics

For the student who desires to pursue a particular topic in depth through guided independent research and/or reading. A faculty member must approve a student's project prior to registration. May be repeated in subsequent terms.

KIN 491 – Clinical Kinesiology -- Sports Injuries Assessment

Practical experience in the examination, diagnosis, and treatment of sports injuries under the supervision of a Certified Athletic Therapist. Case presentations and musculoskeletal assessments are discussed in a group setting. Preference will be given to those who have taken KIN 140L.

KIN 492A – Clinical Kinesiology -- Cardiac Rehabilitation Practicum

Practical experience with cardiac patients in a rehabilitation setting; major emphasis is placed on the cardiorespiratory implications of exercise assessment, prescription and management. Experience obtained in a laboratory setting and through placement at a hospital. Instructor consent required.

KIN 492B – Clinical Kinesiology -- Cardiac Rehabilitation Practicum

Continuation of KIN 492A. Practical experience with cardiac patients in a rehabilitation setting; major emphasis is placed on the cardiorespiratory implications of exercise assessment, prescription and management. Experience obtained in a laboratory setting and through placement at a hospital. Instructor consent required.

KIN 493 – Clinical Kinesiology: Movement Assessment Practicum

Practical experience in movement assessment of persons from various special populations such as the normal elderly and those with neurological, degenerative or developmental disorders. Motor functions involving gait, posture and balance or upper limb movements will typically be examined in these assessments.

KIN 494 – Integrative Ergonomics Practicum

A presentation must be made by each 4B student explaining quantitative and qualitative methods used, interpretation of data where applicable, explanation of interventions employed, together with an overview of components of interest to those in ergonomics. Credit requires both the off-campus practicum experiences and attendance at the seminar component over six academic terms where all students are expected to participate in debate of ergonomic issues. Occasional guest ergonomists address the group. Graded credit/non credit.

KIN 601 – Muscle Physiology

An analysis of the morphological, biophysical, molecular and physiological properties of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle. Topics range from the molecular regulation of muscle contraction, excitation-contraction processes, fatigue mechanisms, cell signalling, adaptability and pathophysiology.

KIN 602 – Respiratory and Cardiovascular Physiology

The physiology of the cardiovascular and endocrine systems in work and superimposed environmental stresses are examined. Topics include myocardial function, hemodynamics, microcirculation, diffusion, acid base balance, body fluid regulation and the nature of hormonal and neural control systems.

KIN 606 – Molecular Basis of Disease

This course will examine cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a major role in causing dysfunction of a variety of relevant tissues under a number of chronic conditions including aging, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, autoimmune disorders, neurodegenerative conditions, and muscular diseases. Topics to be covered include satellite cells/stem cells, apoptosis and necrosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial DNA, oxidative stress, autophagy and protein degradation, and inflammation.

KIN 607 – Integrative Energy Metabolism in Health and Disease

This course will comprehensively examine the metabolic processes involved in energy production and expenditure in different tissues. The regulation and integration of protein, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism will be studied in the context of energy balance for healthy, aging and disease populations (including diabetes and cancer). The course will also explore nutrition and exercise implications on metabolism and disease.

KIN 608 – Introduction to Genetics for the Biosciences

Genetic variation helps determine "innate" individual characteristics of health and disease, ranging from eye colour to preferences for food flavours, to ability to metabolize specific amino acids. Genetic variation also modulates how we respond to our environments. Minor variants in genetic code can affect physiological outcomes such as changes in body mass with caloric restriction, changes in endurance capacity with exercise training, and changes in circulating cholesterol levels with high protein intakes. Understanding how genetic variability affects health outcomes will be key to providing early diagnosis and prevention measures to optimize performance, prevent disease, and maximize longevity for individuals. It will also be key to prescribing optimal personalized lifestyle interventions, ranging from diet to exercise to stress reduction and sleep modulation to promote maximal well-being. In addition, recent advances in gene editing technology will be covered, including discussion of ethical issues surrounding application to human embryos and potential for misuse bioterrorism.

KIN 609 – Introduction to Genetics for Biosciences Lab

Introduction to techniques in human DNA analysis, as well as research techniques in plasmid and vector based cloning. An interactive approach to DNA isolation, and common methods of sequence analysis. Issues/confounders in current protocols will be identified and discussed. Students will acquire hands-on experience performing and interpreting genetic analysis.

KIN 611 – Biomechanics of Human Motion

An assessment of research in the biomechanics of human motion including electromyography, muscle modelling, link segment modelling and analysis, energy and power analysis. The above concepts will be utilized in the assessment of athletes and both the normal and atypical population in sport and rehabilitation contexts.

KIN 612 – Instrumentation and Signal Processing in Biophysical Research

Techniques in data acquisition, reduction, and signal processing commonly employed in biophysical research are discussed in class and used in laboratory sessions. Among other instruments, the student becomes familiar with the use of a variety of transducers and their systems characteristics, electromyographs, the process of analog to digital conversion, documentation of motion, stress and strain, and the quantification of medical image data. Signal to noise enhancement is emphasized through all aspects of the course.

KIN 613 – Modern Methods in Biomechanical Modeling, Kinematics, and Kinetics

Biomechanics research typically requires the integration of experimental data collection and theoretical modeling approaches to answer complex questions. The purpose of Kin 613 is to sensitize incoming graduate students to the range, biological basis, and practicality of using or developing mathematical models for biomechanical investigations. This contrasts with KIN 612, which focuses on promoting rigorous experimental data collection and biological signal interpretation, or Kin 611, which seeks to develop the historical foundations of biomechanical research and promote critical reading of the scientific literature.

KIN 616 – Neural Control of Human Movement

An examination of current theories and evidence concerning the neural control of human movement. Topics may include: origin of kinesthesia, organization of spinal circuits and reflex actions regulating posture and movement, neural strategies for the control of upright stance and locomotion, functional organization of the motor cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia for the control of voluntary movement.

KIN 620 – Ergonomic Aspects of Occupational Musculoskeletal Injuries

This course examines the relationships between physical and organizational aspects of the work environment and occupational musculoskeletal fatigue and injuries. Emphasis will be placed on back and upper limb injuries. Major topics covered include injury mechanisms, assessment of injury risk, reporting of injury and use of injury statistics, work site interventions and evaluation of their effectiveness and relevant legislation (including Human Rights considerations). A laboratory project using the methodologies studied in the course is an important component of the course. A project within a local industry, instead of the laboratory project is preferred but optional.

KIN 625 – Social Neuroscience of Exercise and Eating

An examination of current social neuroscientific theories and research in relation to the cognitive aspects of exercise participation and the neurobiology of dietary choice.

KIN 630 – Research Design and Statistical Analysis

A course focused on the core principles of research design (populations, sampling, experimental designs) and statistical applications (descriptive and inferential) specific to Kinesiology and its sub-disciplines.

KIN 631A – Introduction to Statistics

This course introduces basic statistical concepts as they relate to Kinesiology.

KIN 631C – Correlation and Regression

The use of multiple regression models in the anlysis of multi-variable data sets. Strategies for model builidng, fitting of models, assessing model assumptions and testing hypotheses. Application of these models to problems in the health sciences.

KIN 631D – Logistic Regression and Its Application

The use of logistic regression for the analysis of multi-variable data sets with binary response. Strategies for model building, fitting of models, assessing model assumptions and testing hypotheses. Use of these models to anlayze prospective studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies.

KIN 631E – Analysis of Variance I

Review of Hypothesis tests and Confidence intervals for paired and unpaired observations. The concept of a designed experiment and its associated model. Analysis of variance for one and two factor experiments including interaction. Contrasts for comparing various treatment means. Use of Residual analysis to check the statistical assumtpions of a design . SAS may be used to obtain listings used in the analysis.

KIN 631F – Analysis of Variance II

Methods for determining Expected Mean Squares. Design and Analysis of Factorial, Fractional Factorial and Repeated Measures Experiments. Design and Anlysis and other designs as time permits. SAS may be used to obtain listings used in the anlysis .

KIN 631G – Biological Deterministic Modelling and Signal Processing

Mathematical and computer modelling of first and second order passive and active biological systems; neuron, muscle and diffusion models. Biological feedback control systems: control of posture, gait and tracking tasks. Signal processing; analog and digital filtering, harmonic analyses, impulse response, convolution.

KIN 646 – Physiological and Biochemical Aspects of Nutrition and Health

Selected nutrients will be examined in detail in regards to dietary intake, metabolism, metabolism and mechanistic effects on human health. Comprehensive coverage of nutrients is not intended, but the specific nutrients examined will include at least one example each from lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, water soluble vitamins, lipid soluble vitamins and minerals.

KIN 651 – Motor Learning

An examination of current theories models and experimental literature concerned with the learning and performance of skilled movement. Topics may include: models of motor learning, expert-novice differences in skill, the automatization of skill, mental practice, the relationship between cognitive and motor skills.

KIN 652 – Movement Control and Learning

This course deals with the learning and control of goal-directed eye, head, arm and hand movements. Topics include: Hick's and Fitt's Laws; goals, task plans and motor equivalence; the actor/environment interface; movement planning and organization; use of schemas, motor programs, feedforward and sensory feedback; motorsensory integration; and knowledge representation.

KIN 653 – Human Neuroscience Theory

The course will provide a comprehensive examination of topics related to human neuroscience as it broadly relates to movement. These topics include the central nervous system control of human movement, sensorimotor control systems and modulation, attention, psychological factors that influence emotional and behavioral adaptation to chronic illnesses, prehension, movement sequencing, limb gesturing, tool use, gait and posture.

KIN 654 – Instrumentation in Neuroscience Research

Human neuroscience research techniques are discussed in class and used in laboratory sessions. Students will learn the theory and gain practical experience with electroencephalography, event-related potentials, functional magnetic resonance imaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation, electromyography, digitized optical tacking of movement, psychophysics and survey methodologies.

KIN 655 – Theory and Practice of Movement Assessment

This seminar and laboratory based course will examine the theoretical and practical use of movement assessment technologies and techniques. This course will cover the approaches ranging from advanced research based technologies to clinical methods to assess movement. The course will also explore emerging technologies to assess movement including wireless and wearable technologies. The laboratory content will reinforce a skill based component to familiarize students with the use of a range of tools as well as interpretation of such information.

KIN 656 – Neurobehavioural Analyses of Perceptual and Motor Deficits

Perceptual and motor deficits associated with damage to various brain areas are examined in terms of the underlying processing disorders. The role of cognitive (e.g., memory and language), motor (e.g., response complexity) and environmental context are considered. Case studies and clinic visits serve to complement material discussed in the seminar.

KIN 670A – Neuroscience Seminar I

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student research proposals. The content of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. Both MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 670B – Neuroscience Seminar II

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student research proposals. The content of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. Both MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 670C – Seminar 1: Motor Learning

Both the MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670C, 670D, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 670D – Seminar 1: Psychomotor Behavior

Both the MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670C, 670D, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 670E – Biomechanics Seminar I

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student research proposals. The content of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. Both MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 670F – Biomechanics Seminar II

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student research proposals. The content of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. Both MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 670H – Physiology and Nutrition Seminar I

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student research proposals. The content of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. Both MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 670I – Physiology and Nutrition Seminar II

This is a weekly seminar including both student and faculty presentations of current research and student research proposals. The content of the seminars may vary from term to term depending on the availability of invited speakers, topics of interest to students and faculty, and the research of members of the group. Both MSc and PhD degree students must register for two of the following: KIN 670A, 670B, 670E, 670F, 670H, 670I to fulfill degree requirements.

KIN 680 – Selected Topics in Physiology and Nutrition

KIN 682 – Selected Topics in Biomechanics

KIN 684 – Selected Topics in the Social Science of Sport

KIN 686 – Selected Topics in Neuroscience I

KIN 687 – Fundamentals of Behavioural Neuroscience

This survey course will be team-taught by members of the collaborative program, and will serve to introduce students to major subareas of ongoing behavioural neuroscience research at Waterloo. Topics will include cognitive psychopathology, apraxia, topics in visual neuroscience, early experience and brain development, cognitive electrophysiology, human locomotion, neuropathology of schizophrenia, object recognition, hemispheric specialization, motor control and psychoneuroimmunology.

KIN 691 – Cardiorespiratory Assessment and Interpretation

As the prescription of exercise physiology is a major contributor to health and well-being, this module will develop the student's ability to administer and interpret tests of the cardiorespiratory system and functional status of clients within human performance and clinical exercise physiology target pathologies. The results will be used to design appropriate exercise programs to meet the goals and underlying pathology of the condition of performance requirements. Students will review and interpret the literature to construct, apply and justify the inclusion of exercise assessment modalities (Cardiac Stress Tests, Cardiorespiratory Exercise Testing (VO2), Interpret the results and use these results to prescribe modes, intensities and volumes of exercise that are indicated; design, implement, modify and progress exercise programs.

KIN 700 – Muscle Metabolism in Work

This course will focus on extra- and intramuscular metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and protein in animal and human skeletal and cardiac muscle during work. Special emphasis will be placed on control and integration of muscle fuel metabolism under different intensities and durations of contractile activity.

KIN 702 – Cardiorespiratory Integration

The control of cardiorespiratory responses to exercise will be examined by detailed consideration of afferent, central neural and effector mechanisms for regulation.

KIN 704 – Bioactive Lipids

Lipids are intimately linked to all cellular functions based not only on their structural role as membrane components, but also their use as fuel, interactions with proteins, as important second messengers in cell signalling and potent regulators of gene expression. The present course will examine the properties and how they impact various biological functions and human conditions including inflammation and cardiovascular disease. The course will also examine dominant lip analytical techniques that are specific to this field of study and examine the emerging field of lipidomics.

KIN 707 – Integrative Physiology in Work

This course will examine the bodyUs response to exercise an integrated phenomenon involving the coordinated response to several individual systems. Particular attention will be given to the hormonal and neural bases by which inter and intracellular communication is achieved. Adaptive strategies will be studied from both acute and chronic perspectives.

KIN 713 – Modelling of Human Musculoskeletal System during Movement

Modelling of the human musculoskeletal system during movement is explored using a number of techniques. Assumptions and difficulties in applying modelling techniques to the human body are stressed.

KIN 714 – Advanced Electromyography

Topics include modelling of the neuromuscular basis of the myoelectric signal; processing of the EMG via functions (spectral and correlational, amplitude and temporal density); changes of EMG due to fatigue myopathies, etc. Neural and muscle stimulation techniques are also examined.

KIN 715 – Assessment of Pathological Movement

The use of biomechanical measurement and modelling techniques for the assessment of pathological movement. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the use of advanced biomechanics to diagnose and monitor the rehabilitation of the physically handicapped. The emphasis will be on the process of integrating many different kinetic, kinematic and EMG variables. The importance of data bases on normals and the problems of follow-up assessments on specific patients are also stressed.

KIN 727 – Low Back Disorders: Optimizing Prevention, Rehabilitation and Performance

An advanced graduate course that synthesizes the multidisciplinary issues (psychosicial, behavioural, physiological, biomechanical and legislative) related to low back disorders. A solid scientific foundation is developed from the study of anatomy, normal function and injury mechanics. This foundation is used to substantiate the best strategies for injury prevention, rehabilitation and performance training. Heldwith KIN 427.

KIN 730 – Fundamentals of Work and Health

This course will provide an overview of current thinking on work and health by introducing students to major substantive topics in the area from a multi-disciplinary perspective. The course will critically examine a variety of topics that may be investigated from different disciplinary perspectives. Classes will include presentations by faculty members representing different disciplines in the collaborative program. Examples of topics discussed in a given term may include work-stress relationships, healthy workplaces, and vulnerable populations.

KIN 731 – Approaches to Research in Work and Health

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to different ways of designing and implementing research within the topic area of work and health as well as some of the practical, political and ethical challenges. The course content will include an examination of the epistemological positions associated with different types of research questions, analysis of case studies of research in work and health, and discussions of proposed research questions and proposals that examine problems from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The course will also include presentations by researchers and practitioners from the work and health domain, who will facilitate discussions on the challenges and opportunities of conducting and applying research in this area.

KIN 732A – Work and Health Research Seminar (I)

This seminar is a forum for student presentations about results of or proposals for research. Invited speakers will also present results of research from time to time. Attendance at the seminar is required for two terms (i.e., during the candidates' first two years in the program). Attendance beyond that is encouraged. The range of topics that will be addressed in the seminar crosses all areas of investigation in the collaborative program. Grading will be on a credit/no credit basis.

KIN 732B – Work and Health Research Seminar (II)

This seminar is a forum for student presentations about results of or proposals for research. Invited speakers will also present results of research from time to time. Attendance at the seminar is required for two terms (i.e., during the candidates' first two years in the program). Attendance beyond that is encouraged. The range of topics that will be addressed in the seminar crosses all areas of investigation in the collaborative program. Grading will be on a credit/no credit basis.

KIN 750 – Fundamentals of Aging, Health and Well-being

This survey course will be team-taught by members of the collaborative program and will serve to introduce students to major sub-areas of aging, health and well-being research. Topics will be covered from each Department within the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences.

KIN 751 – Aging, Health and Well-being Research Seminar

This seminar is a forum for student presentations about results of, or proposals for research. Invited speakers will also present results of research from time to time. Attendance at the seminar is required for two terms (i.e., during the candidates' first two years in the program). The range of topics that will be addressed in the seminar crosses all areas of investigation in the collaborative program. Grading will be on a credit/no credit basis. Must be registered in the PhD program in Aging, Health and Well-being.

KIN 760 – Selected Topics Neuroscience II

An analysis of specific topics of interest. The form of study may involve a review of literature or the planning and execution of an independent study resulting in a paper for possible publication.

KIN 775 – Key Issues and Concerns in Kinesiology

Kinesiology 775 provides an opportunity for Kinesiology Doctoral students to examine some of the key issues and concerns that will arise in their post graduate careers. The course is organized in a seminar format. Examples of topics covered in the course are: Post Doctoral Positions in University and other settings; Job Interviews; Career Paths Within Academia: Promotion and Tenure Concerns; Collaborations; Reviewing Manuscripts and Grants and Writing Reference Letters. Ph.D. students must successfully complete this seminar at least once during their program. Normally, this course should be taken after the first year of registration in the Ph.D. program. Will be graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.

KIN 780 – Selected Topics in Physiology and Nutrition

An analysis of specific topics of interest. The form of study may involve a review of literature or the planning and execution of an independent study resulting in a paper for possible publication.

KIN 782 – Selected Topics in Biomechanics

An analysis of specific topics of interest. The form of study may involve a review of literature or the planning and execution of an independent study resulting in a paper for possible publication.