Zachary Seguin

HIST Courses

HIST 102 – War and Society in Europe, 1914-1945

This course explores the impact of World Wars I and II on European society, with a special emphasis on the experiences of the ordinary person.

HIST 103 – Canadian History Through Biography

An examination through lectures and film of the lives of Canadian men and women who have played formative roles in developing the Canadian nation. Examples will be drawn from such areas as politics, religion, business and labour, social reform, arts and entertainment, and sports.

HIST 104 – An Introduction to Western Intellectual History Since the Renaissance

An exploration of some of the questions and answers posed by thinkers on the human predicament from Renaissance and Reformation times to the modern period. Readings range from Luther to J.P. Sartre, Shakespeare to Marx and Freud.

HIST 105 – Rock 'n' Roll and US History

This course explores the politics, culture, media, race relations, and gender relations of the United States after 1945 through the lens of rock and roll.

HIST 106 – Canada at War

This course introduces students to the ways in which historians have examined Canada's military experience. Beginning with the Boer War, and continuing through the two World Wars and the post-war era, students examine the political, social, as well as military effects of war on Canada.

HIST 108 – Family Ties in History

This course will examine some of the methods of genealogy within the context of the economic, social, religious and political forces that have shaped families and their histories in Canada.

HIST 109 – Ten Days That Shook the World

Focusing on ten different days that forever transformed the world's history, this course introduces first-year students to moments of dramatic change in diverse time periods and places. Topics may include the Fall of Ancient and Modern Regimes; the Age of Discovery; Religious Cataclysm; Revolutionary Wars; Technological, Intellectual, and Scientific Inventions. Students are introduced to the differing methods that historians use to understand the past.

HIST 110 – A History of the Western World I

This course will survey the emergence and development of the Western world, from prehistory to 1715. Complementing the chronological and narrative overview of Western culture and civilization will be thematic surveys of developments in the arts and humanities, science, and socio-political structures.

HIST 111 – A History of the Western World II

This course will survey the emergence and development of the Western world from the 17th century to the present. Complementing the chronological and narrative overview of Western culture and civilization will be thematic surveys of developments in the arts and humanities, science, and socio-political structures.

HIST 113 – Canadian Business History: Innovators and Entrepreneurs

This course examines the role of individuals in the growth of business in Canada. While there will be general examination of Canadian economic development, the principal focus will fall upon leading Canadian business persons and their interests and innovations. The relationship to the state of business, the place of education, and the impact of immigration are other topics that the course will consider.

HIST 114 – A Comparative History of Empires

This course examines the role of empires in modern history. It will examine how empires were formed, how they functioned, how they were resisted, and how they collapsed. While the focus will be on the European empires, we will also assess other examples, including the empires of the Ottomans, the Japanese, the Chinese, and the United States.

HIST 115 – Crusading in the Middle Ages

This course examines the historical events and cultural assumptions that led to the European phenomenon of crusading, or holy war, between 1095 and 1453.

HIST 120 – The United States at War, 1861-1945

This course will explore the social, cultural, and military impact of the Civil War and World Wars I and II on American society.

HIST 130 – The Modern World in Historical Perspective

This course will introduce students to the history of the twentieth-century world, through an exploration of the changing nature of relationships between different parts of the globe.

HIST 191 – Special Topics in History

One or more topics courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the History Department and geared to first-year students. Topics will be dependent upon special interest and/or instructional interests by non-regular or visiting faculty.

HIST 200 – History and Film

An introduction to issues in modern cultural history through the study of selected narratives and documentary films with supplementary reading, lectures and discussions.

HIST 201 – Columbus and After: New Worlds in the Americas

Beginning with Columbus, this course introduces the history of early America as it was shaped by the encounters between colonizers and colonized. Particular attention is paid to the varied nature of these encounters, and their contested interpretation by historians and others.

HIST 202 – Introduction to Applied History

This course introduces students to the core methodologies of applied history: archival research, oral history, material and visual culture, and digital history.

HIST 203 – Methods of Applied History

This course exposes students to several different forms of applied history, which may include historic mapping, digitization, genealogy, public policy research, corporate history, legal research, tourism, the commemoration industry, historical fiction and creative non-fiction, heritage issues, and the making of historical documentaries. The specific mix of topics addressed in any particular year will vary, depending on the instructor.

HIST 205 – History of Western Sport

This course considers the historical impact of Western sport. It traces the history from individual play through amateurism to professionalism, big business, and media. It examines sport's social role within local, national, and international communities, and its relationship to class, gender, leisure, race, and politics.

HIST 206 – The Victorian Age

During the reign of Queen Victoria (1837-1901), Britain experienced profound change with the expansion of its population, industry, and empire. Poverty and gender and racial discrimination persisted in spite of a marked expansion in political rights. This course will address both progressive and regressive forces during this era, focusing on issues of culture, politics, imperialism, and society.

HIST 207 – The Beatles and the Sixties

The Beatles - their lives, their music, their films, and their impact - are this course's lens to examine the social, political, and cultural upheavals and transformations of the 1960s, and to consider memory, nostalgia, and mythmaking about that storied decade. Primary focus is on the U.K. and U.S., with consideration of Beatlemania as a global phenomenon.

HIST 208 – Foreign Relations of the United States since 1900

This course examines the history of foreign relations of the United States from the "Age of Imperialism" through the "War on Terror." Topics will include the Great War, Wilsonianism, World War II, the Cold War, human rights, and post-9/11 U.S. foreign policies.

HIST 209 – Smallpox to Medicare: Canadian Medical History

Starting with Aboriginal medicine, the course examines topics such as the rise of the medical and nursing professions, changing public attitudes to health and disease, and the evolution of the Canadian health insurance system.

HIST 210 – History of Ancient Law

A historical introduction to law in the ancient world. Babylonian, Assyrian, Hittite, and Roman law, legal practices, and concepts will be examined.

HIST 211 – British History to 1485

A survey of the main stages in the transition of Britain from a remote province of the Roman Empire to a prominent state in post-Reformation Europe. Within the chronological framework, political and constitutional as well as ecclesiastical and social developments will be examined.

HIST 212 – The Computing Society

This course examines the historical and current relationships between computer technology and society. It explores the impact and consequences of computing from a societal perspective, but also considers various nontechnical factors and values that have shaped computing technology and practice. The scope of the course will range from early mechanical aids, through the mid-20th century invention of electronic digital computers, to the networks and mobile applications of the 21st century. Technological studies relating to gender, education, employment and war will be used as focal points. Material artifacts will form a core element of the course.

HIST 213 – A History of Popular Culture

This course introduces students to the history of Western popular culture and may include the study of popular literature, spectacle and performance, witchcraft, crime, sexual attitudes, consumption, sports, advertising, and the media.

HIST 214 – History of Women in the Modern United States

This course will examine women's social, political, cultural, and economic position in the United States from 1920 to the present. We will study the evolving understandings of women's "proper place" in society, which has varied based upon race, class, ethnicity, and region. We will consider women's daily lives and the forces that brought women into the public sphere. Topics covered will include women's political activism, legal position, sexuality, and paid and unpaid labour.

HIST 215 – Canadian Women in Historical Perspective

This course will focus on the interrelationship of women and Canadian society through an examination of women's private and public lives.

HIST 216 – From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: A (Long) History of the Internet

This course contextualizes the information age around us: it examines both the technological story of the rise of the Internet, and the longer human story about the evolving concept of information, communication over time and space, and the ubiquity and complexity of the systems at the heart of our globalized world.

HIST 220 – The Vietnam War

The Vietnam War, the longest war in U.S. history, was fought on two fronts, by American G.I.s abroad and anti-war protesters at home. Those two subjects, as well as a history of the war from Vietnamese perspectives, are the focus of this course.

HIST 221 – Racism and Response in Canadian History

The "race problem" has appeared on the Canadian public agenda, but the issue is not of recent origin. This course examines Euro-Canadian attitudes and practices toward non-European minorities from pioneer times to the present and sets racial policies in the context of the evolution of a Canadian national identity.

HIST 223 – The Holocaust in History

An examination of the Holocaust in the context of the history of modern racism. Study topics will include historic anti-Judaism, scientific racism and the development of modern antisemitism, Nazi 'race' ideology, wartime policies from ghetto to genocide, resistance movements, Nuremberg trials, Holocaust denial, and universal lessons from the Holocaust.

HIST 224 – Food, Culture, and History

This course will examine the role of foodstuffs and foodways in world history, with an emphasis on Canada in the 20th century. Themes such as colonialism, immigration, ethnic identity, religion, gender, famine, and political policy will be examined to explore how food, and its associated habits and customs, has been central to the evolution of cultural patterns of the past.

HIST 225 – History of Education in Canada

This course considers the development of education as an institution within Canadian society and provides an understanding of significant educational issues and policies from a historical perspective.

HIST 226 – Canada in World War II

The Canadian experience in World War II is still a subject of considerable debate. This course will employ lectures, films, and discussion groups to examine the war's impact on the social, economic, political, and military life of the country from 1939 to 1945.

HIST 227 – The French Revolution and Napoleonic Europe

This course will examine the causes and consequences of the French Revolution and the impact of Napoleon's reign in France and Europe.

HIST 230 – Introduction to the Modern Middle East

This course examines the modern political history of the Middle East, with an emphasis on international affairs. It examines the colonization of the Middle East, the rise of national self-determination and nation-states, enduring Arab-Israeli conflicts, the Cold War, and the impact of U.S. foreign policy in shaping the modern Middle East.

HIST 231R – The History of East Asian Communities in Canada

This course examines the evolution of the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean communities in Canada as well as their significance for Canadian economic, social, and political life in the 19th and 20th centuries.

HIST 232 – A History of Peace Movements

A survey of individuals and groups that have created popular movements for peace globally and locally throughout history. The scope will be international, with a particular focus on the nineteenth- and twentieth-century movements. The choice of peace movements will allow for a contrast in comparison of ideology, strategy, and impact.

HIST 234 – The Catholic Church in Canada

An examination of the role played by the Church in the social, political, and economic life of Canada from 1867 to the present.

HIST 235 – History of Christianity

The development of Christianity in its Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Protestant traditions from the time of Christ to the present.

HIST 236 – Law and Society in the Middle Ages

A study of the laws and legal procedures of the Middle Ages. This course examines the relationship between legal procedures and institutions and the medieval societies that produced them.

HIST 237 – The Ancient Near East and Egypt

A study of the civilizations of the ancient Near East focusing on Mesopotamia (Sumer and Akkad, the Babylonian Dynasty, and the Third Dynasty of Ur), Hatti, Assyria, Egypt, and Persia.

HIST 239 – History of Modern China, 1911 to the Present

Some of the topics studied in this course include: the three stages of warlordism, the May Fourth Movement, and the structure of society in the People's Republic of China.

HIST 242 – Greek History

A survey of ancient Greek history, from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, emphasizing particularly its political and military aspects.

HIST 243 – European Business History: From Workshop to Factory and Beyond

This course examines the changing nature of work and the workplace in Europe and the impact of those changes on European society. The objective of this course is to develop a better understanding of today's workplace and its challenges by exploring its historical roots and the forces that gave it shape.

HIST 244 – The Medium and the Message: Canadian Media, a History

An examination through lecture and film of print journalism, broadcasting, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the National Film Board, Wartime propaganda, the Canadian music industry, and the other diverse forms of media.

HIST 245 – War, Ethnicity and Religion in East Central Europe, 1453-1739

This historical survey of a region encompassing the contemporary Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia, Austria, and parts of Serbia, Romania and Germany is crucial for understanding important contemporary developments. The focus will be on how East Central Europe was shaped by an orientation toward Western Christianity, confrontations with the Islamic empire of the Ottoman Turks, the experience of multiethnicity, and Habsburg subjugation.

HIST 247 – Mennonite History: A Survey

This course covers Mennonite origins, teachings, migrations, settlement patterns, divisions, leaders, institutions, and religious and social practices, indeed all facets of Mennonite history in various national settings.

HIST 249 – The American Impact on Canada

This course will examine the social, economic, cultural, and diplomatic aspects of Canada's relationship with the United States, from the time of the American Revolution to the present.

HIST 250 – What is History? An Introduction to Historical Thinking

This course provides a collegial learning setting within which students are introduced to techniques of historical writing and research, and some examples of the best of recent historical scholarship.

HIST 252 – Roman History

A survey of ancient Roman history, from the Republic to the Empire, emphasizing particularly its political and military aspects.

HIST 253 – Canada: Cultures and Conflicts in the Colonial Era

This course examines the major themes in pre-Confederation Canadian history including the rise and fall of New France, the creation of British North American societies in the Maritimes and Upper Canada, and economic and political development.

HIST 254 – Canada Since 1867: A New Nation

This course examines Confederation, the rise of political parties, Canadian external relations, western discontent, the impact of both World Wars and political and economic changes in Canada since 1867.

HIST 255 – History of Childhood and Youth in Canada

This course offers a Canadian history of childhood and youth. While childhood may seem like a timeless, eternal concept, it is actually a modern one. This course considers age as a category of analysis, complementing other key concepts such as gender, class, and ethnicity/race.

HIST 256 – Murder in Canadian History

This course examines several major murder cases in Canadian history in order to provide insight into Canada's history and explore how the nation has developed legally, politically, economically, and socially.

HIST 257 – America: From Slavery to Civil War

This historical survey focuses on the emergence of the United States as a nation. The topics explored may include indigenous peoples, slavery, race, gender, labour, immigration, urbanization, culture, sectionalism, politics, and ideologies.

HIST 258 – The United States: From World Power to the War on Terror

This course begins in the aftermath of the Civil War and ends at the present day. Topics may include major social movements, the place of the United States in world politics, immigration and imperialism, and the economy.

HIST 260 – Europe: 410-1303

The political, cultural, economic, and ecclesiastical development of Europe from the fall of the Roman Empire to the end of the High Middle Ages.

HIST 262 – Early Modern Europe 1450-1700

This course examines European life in the Early Modern Period (1450-1700) and investigates the social, political, religious, and intellectual changes during the Renaissance, the Reformations, and the era of explorations.

HIST 263 – The Age of Revolution: Europe in the 19th Century

This period marks the emergence of modern-day Europe. The course focuses on the way in which European society, politics, and culture changed, and why. It also examines the continent's descent into war in 1914.

HIST 264 – Western Europe Since 1945

Western Europe since the end of World War II. Focus will be on the Cold War, political and social movements.

HIST 265 – Eastern Europe Since 1945

An introduction to the social, economic and political history of the countries of Eastern Europe since 1945. Topics may include the implementation of Communism, daily life, the secret police, women, opposition, and revolution.

HIST 266 – The British Empire 1857-1956

This course assesses the transformation of the British Empire from its position of comparative strength in the mid-nineteenth century to decolonization and the emergence of the Commonwealth after the Second World War. Topics of study include systems of power and control, the impact of Empire at home, and the manner in which imperialism influenced colonial subjects.

HIST 268 – A Global History of Empires

This course examines the role of empires in modern history. It examines how empires were formed, how they functioned, how they were resisted, and how they collapsed. While the focus will be on the European empires, we also assess other examples, including the empires of the Ottomans, the Japanese, the Chinese, and the United States.

HIST 269 – Aboriginal History of Canada

This course examines the history of aboriginal peoples within Canada from before contact to the present. It emphasizes the relationship between aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit, Métis) and settler society, forms of indigenous resistance and assertions of rights, the diverse nature of communities and cultures, and the relationship between local and national histories.

HIST 271 – Global Indigenous Issues

This course examines the histories of Indigenous peoples from around the world, covering areas such as educational assimilation, the internationalization of Indigenous rights, lands and resource development conflicts, Indigenous-state relations, language and cultural revitalization, and international political activism. We examine local Indigenous histories and place these experiences into the larger global context.

HIST 275 – The Modern World in Historical Perspective

This survey of the 20th century explores the non-Western world's response to a series of selected global themes: the rise of the West; post-colonialism; war and peace; human migration; culture; international organizations; climate change; human rights; disease; and globalization.

HIST 277 – Canadian Legal History

This course examines the Canadian legal system from colonial times to the present with particular emphasis on such themes as law and the economy, courts and judiciary, the legal profession, family and criminal law, women and the law, and civil liberties.

HIST 278 – Red Star vs. Swastika: Russia and WWII

This course examines the Eastern Front in World War II. It investigates such themes as the impact of totalitarian state systems and radical ideologies on the war; interwar diplomacy; key campaigns; genocide; the wartime economies; propaganda; resistance and collaboration; the plight of prisoners of war; women on the battlefield; and relations among members of the opposing coalitions.

HIST 282 – History of Modern South Asia 1750-2000

This course provides an overview of the political developments and conflicts that have shaped modern South Asia from 1750 to 2000 through an examination of the region's cultures, political systems, encounters with Western imperialism, nationalist movements, and the impact of the Cold War.

HIST 285W – Ancient Art Beyond the West (WLU)

HIST 289 – JFK: The Decision-Maker Behind the Myth

This course re-examines John F. Kennedy's presidency, refuting myths about his decision-making in war and peace. Students grapple with historical sources in a trans-media platform. They are invited to relate the past to contemporary issues of war and peace in an intensive learning experience.

HIST 291 – Special Topics in History

One or more term courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the History Department. Topics will be dependent upon special research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

HIST 300 – History and the Human Sciences

This introduction to historiography traces the relationship between history and other human sciences (anthropology, economics, literature, philosophy, and sociology) since the 19th century. In addition to strengthening critical skills, it offers interdisciplinary perspectives on problems of objectivity, documentary evidence, forms of story-telling, and causal explanations.

HIST 302 – Applied History Project

This course provides the opportunity to design, research, and produce a history project in a multimedia format. Students incorporate archival, visual culture, and oral history research in their projects and examine the politics, ethics, and practice of historical research and its presentation to wide audiences.

HIST 303 – History Gone Digital: An Introduction to History with the Web

Digital history, the application of new and emerging technologies to the study of history, is an exciting new field. This course explores the literature on digital history and then puts theory into practice by exploring the digital collection, evaluation, and production of historical knowledge.

HIST 304 – Heresy and Religious Crises in Late Medieval Europe

An exploration of the impact of social crises on late medieval religious modes of expression. Topics will include the Great Famine, the Black Death, the Avignon Papacy and Western Schism, the development of heretical movements, and the eventual disintegration of European religious unity.

HIST 305 – Historical Memory and National Identity

What factors create a national identity: historical events or socially-constructed historical memory? By analyzing key themes such as elite and popular culture, historical sites and commemorations, sports, and iconic public events, this course demonstrates how nation-states and other communities have created a series of evolving national identities.

HIST 309 – The Discourse of Dissent

A study of the social, historical, and rhetorical dimensions of collective action. Topics may include health and welfare movements, civil rights and anti-war protests, and environmentalism.

HIST 310 – The American West: Legend and Reality

An exploration of westward expansion in the United States in the 18th and 19th centuries and its impact on American popular imagination. Themes will include explorations, indigenous peoples, labor, women, violence, and frontier culture.

HIST 311 – International Relations, 1890-1951

This course examines the international relations of the great powers from the rise of Wilhelmine Germany in the 1890s to the first steps of European integration in the early 1950s. Attention will be paid to the formation of foreign policy, alliances, leadership, war-making, and peace-making.

HIST 312 – The First World War

This course examines the origins, conduct, and wider international legacy of the First World War. The course has an international outline, but with a particular Canadian focus as it explores tactics, strategy, and the soldier's experience, as well as the War's lasting economic, political, and cultural impacts.

HIST 313 – History of the Family in North America

This course will consider the history of private interactions between family members in North America, as well as the family's relationship to public forces such as politics, the law, social movements, and the economy. Other topics covered in this course include changing conventions of courtship and dating, marriage, divorce, parenthood, and childhood.

HIST 314 – The American Civil Rights Movement

This course will explore the Civil Rights movement in the United States from the 1950s to the 1970s. Topics will include the origins and evolution of the movement, tactics, key figures, and the role of the federal government.

HIST 315 – U.S. and the World

This course examines the history of foreign relations of the United States from the "Age of Imperialism" through the "War on Terror". Topics will include the Great War, Wilsonianism, World War II, the Cold War, human rights, and post-9/11 U.S. foreign policies.

HIST 316 – The Russian Revolution

This course traces the history of the Russian Revolution from 1861 to 1924. It examines the intellectual and social roots of the Revolution, a variety of revolutionary theories, parties, agendas and methods of power struggle, the Bolshevik seizure of power and the ensuing civil war, culminating in the establishment of a communist dictatorship.

HIST 317 – History of Sexuality: The Pre-Modern Period

This course introduces students to the history of Western sexuality, beginning with the ancient world and focusing primarily on the Middle Ages and the transition to modernity.

HIST 318 – History of Sexuality: The Modern Period

This seminar introduces students to the history of sexuality. The course focuses on the 19th and 20th centuries.

HIST 321 – Human Rights in Historical Perspective

A detailed analysis of selected topics in the history of human rights. Special attention will be paid to revolutionary developments since World War II, and to the emergence of modern human rights policies. Topics will be examined through assigned readings, lectures, and films.

HIST 329 – Origins of the Common Law

A study of the common law of England from its introduction in the 11th century to the 15th century. Original documents and court cases will be examined.

HIST 339 – The History of France in the 19th Century

A study of French society and the four revolutions that influenced it with particular attention to social and institutional forces.

HIST 340 – A Social History of Europe: 1789-1914

European society amidst the dramatic changes of the 19th century. Emphasis is given to the impact of the French and industrial revolutions on class, the family, religion, and living conditions.

HIST 341 – The Nazi Occupation of Europe

This course examines the nature and impact of Nazi occupation on Western and Eastern Europe preceding and during World War II and the responses of the people occupied.

HIST 347 – Witches, Wives, and Whores

This course explores the ways in which Early Modern European women experienced, participated in, shaped, and responded to the world they inhabited. It investigates the ways in which women negotiated the Early Modern world as it unfolded in the Renaissance, the Reformation, European encounters around the world, and the challenges of everyday life.

HIST 348 – The Radical Reformation

A study of 16th century Anabaptism - a religious Reformation movement dissenting from both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism - its origins, its social, political, and theological content; and its relationship to such independent dissenters as Sebastian Franck.

HIST 350 – Canada and the Americas

This course will examine the economic, cultural, and diplomatic aspects of Canada's relationship with the United States, Latin America, and the Commonwealth Caribbean from the time of the American Revolution to the present.

HIST 351 – Canada: The Immigrant Experience

Immigrants and immigration have always been central to Canadians' perceptions of themselves as a country and as a society. This course will examine the immigrant experience and Canada's changing policies and attitudes toward immigration and immigrants from New France to the present.

HIST 356 – Russia: From Tsars to Putin

This course examines the history of Russia and the Soviet Union from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. Topics include: origins and nature of the Russian Revolution, communist society, Stalinism, the Cold War, and impact of the communist experience on contemporary Russia.

HIST 358 – Nazi Germany

An examination of the social, economic and political history of Nazi Germany. Topics may include the rise of the Nazis, the secret police, war, population policies and mass murder, culture, and women.

HIST 359 – Fascism beyond Germany

This course offers a comparative analysis of fascism in Italy, Spain, France, Hungary, Romania, Yugoslavia, and Ukraine. Topics include social conditions facilitating the emergence of fascism, fascist ideologies, the popular appeal of fascism, the social composition of fascist parties, and the methods fascists used to take and keep power.

HIST 363W – Jews in Modern Europe 1750-1938 (WLU)

HIST 369 – The Politics of Decolonization

This course examines the break-up of empires in the mid/late 20th century, and assesses how the colonial experience has shaped relations between and among former imperial polities to the present. Focus is given to questions of political identity in colonial and post-colonial societies, and how these identities shape current political challenges.

HIST 370 – Bond, Bowie, and Brexit: Britain from 1945 to the New Millennium

The United Kingdom underwent a remarkable transition in the second half of the twentieth century. It lost an empire, experienced large-scale immigration from around the world, joined the European Economic Community (now the European Union), and became a global cultural engine. This course examines the history of Britain from the end of the Second World War until recent events including the death of Princess Diana and Brexit. In this course you will study decolonization and its impact on British society, the creation and expansion of the welfare state, the "White Heat" of the "Swinging Sixties," shifting dynamics of class and gender, British popular culture from James Bond to David Bowie to Britpop, Irish and Scottish nationalism, the rise of Margaret Thatcher and neo-liberalism in the 1980s, New Labour in the 1990s, and developments in the new millennium.

HIST 371 – Ireland Before the Famine

A focus on social and economic determinants of Irish History from the Penal Era to the 19th century struggle for Catholic emancipation and the Great Famine.

HIST 372 – Ireland After the Famine

An exploration of the political, social and cultural history of Ireland from the Famine to the end of the 20th century including the formation of the Irish State, the Republic and the "Troubles".

HIST 374 – Canada's Social History

A topical consideration of key themes, approaches, and chronologies in the history of society in Canada.

HIST 377R – Cold War in East Asia

This course examines the origins, developments, and contemporary implications of the Cold War in East Asia.

HIST 379 – Reformation History

A study of the major 16th-century reformers, and their intellectual background in humanism and late medieval scholasticism. Special attention will be given to the Lutheran and Reformed traditions, and their ideological, social, and political expressions.

HIST 380 – History of the Canadian North: From Pre-contact to the Creation of Nunavut

The idea of "northerness" is central to our national identity, yet few "southern" Canadians have an appreciation of the historical development of Northern Canada. This course will focus on political, social, cultural, and environmental histories, and will introduce students to major themes in Canadian Northern history, from pre-contact to the creation of the territory of Nunavut in 1999.

HIST 385 – From Macdonald to Laurier: Canada, 1841-1921

A topical examination of major political and social developments over this eighty-year period. These include Irish immigration, Confederation, the Riel rebellions, social reform, the development of labour and business, and the Boer and First World Wars.

HIST 387 – Ontario History since Confederation

The course will examine the emergence of Ontario as an industrial giant and the development of its hegemony in Canada. An emphasis will also be placed on the sources and methods of local historical research.

HIST 388 – Modern Canada

Lectures, tutorials, and independent research will provide a decade-by-decade examination of the central social, political, and economic themes that have helped characterize "modern Canada".

HIST 389 – Canada in World Affairs

An analytical and historical examination of Canadian foreign policy in the international system. Domestic sources of Canadian foreign policy and international sources of Canadian foreign policy are examined in detail.

HIST 390 – The Canadian City Since 1880

The course focuses on the history of environmental issues such as pollution and water management and social problems in health, education, welfare and culture.

HIST 391 – Special Topics in History

One or more term courses will be offered from time to time as announced by the History Department. Topics will be dependent upon special research and/or instructional interests of faculty.

HIST 397 – Directed Studies in Special Topics

Study in a limited field under tutorial guidance. A high standard of written work will be expected.

HIST 398 – Directed Studies in Special Topics

Study in a limited field under tutorial guidance. A high standard of written work will be expected.

HIST 400A – Early Modern Europe

Selected themes in the historiography of the study of Early Modern Europe.

HIST 400B – Early Modern Europe

Research seminar in particular topics related to the study of Early Modern European history.

HIST 401A – European

Selected themes in the historiography of European history.

HIST 401B – European

Research seminar in particular topics related to the study of European history.

HIST 402A – Medieval Europe

Selected themes in the historiography and methodology of medieval European history.

HIST 402B – Medieval Europe

Research seminar in particular topics related to the study of European medieval history.

HIST 403A – Canadian

Selected themes in the historiography of Canadian history.

HIST 403B – Canadian

Research seminar in particular topics related to the study of Canadian history.

HIST 407A – Race in Modern History

Selected topics in the historiography of the study of "race" in modern history.

HIST 407B – Race in Modern History

Research seminar in particular topics related to the study of "race" in modern history.

HIST 409A – American

Selected topics in the historiography of American history.

HIST 409B – American

Research seminar in particular topics related to the study of American history.

HIST 411A – Senior Seminar - International

Selected topics in the historiography of international history.

HIST 411B – Senior Seminar - International

Research seminar in particular topics related to the study of international history.

HIST 421 – Special Topics in History

A special study of a selected topic in history. Please see course instructor for details.

HIST 422 – Special Topics in History

This seminar is a special study of a selected topic in history. Please see course instructor for details.

HIST 450 – The History Capstone

The Capstone challenges students with an opportunity to synthesize and showcase, at a high level of achievement, the disciplinary skills and knowledge they have gained during the course of their studies in History. It encourages students to pursue individual research interests and presentation formats as limited only by historical methodology, academic rigour, and the consent of the instructor.

HIST 491 – Independent Study in Special Topics

Under exceptional circumstances a student may seek permission to pursue a course of independent study under the direction of a faculty member. The special topic is determined in consultation between them.

HIST 601 – Canadian History I

HIST 602 – Canadian History II

HIST 603 – Nationalism and Ethnic Policies of Multinational States

The course explores the concept of nationalism and the responses of multiethnic states to nationalist challenge. Students will examine theories of nationalism and discuss its creative and destructive potential. Pursuit of national self-determination led to the birth of new states and the disintegration of old ones: ethnic tensions were another product of nationalism. Different types of states have addressed ethnic problems in different ways: some have sought to maintain harmonious multicultural communities: others have preferred to assimilate or segregate minorities; yet others have engaged in ethnic cleansing. We will trace the roots of nationalism and the consequences of its rise, and we will also discuss the impact of state system on the ethnic policy.

HIST 604 – Theory and Practice of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency: Historical and Contemporary Issues

This seminar offers a comparative analysis of insurgency and counterinsurgency from the 19th century to the present. It examines resistance to foreign invaders in Europe, the century of rebellion in Mexico in 1810-1917, anti-colonial wars of national liberation, Marxist revolutionary movements in South-East Asia and Latin America, the upsurge of Islamic fundamentalism and urban guerrilla warfare. The course will focus on the sources of insurgencies, their nature and the support they drew from various social groups. In each case, the government's response will also be investigated. We will analyse theories of guerrilla thinkers and pacification models and pay particular attention to the gap between intended and actual policies, and the plight of civilians caught in crossfire.

HIST 605 – Global Governance in Historical Perspective

This course examines the various ways global actors have identified and tried to solve global problems in the twentieth century. We will study the interactions between international organizations, state actors, non-governmental organizations, and informal interest groups as they have confronted global issues such as war, immigration, international trade, human rights, and environmental and health crises.

HIST 606 – International Development in Historical Perspective

This course examines the theory of international development and how it has been applied in practice. As well, students will assess the records of various international actors in terms of their success or failure in providing development assistance. They will also study the interactions between international organizations, states, non-governmental organizations and more informal interest groups through their involvement in overseas development assistance. Finally, the role played by the Cold War in determining Overseas Development Assistance priorities will be examined.

HIST 607 – Human Rights in Historical Perspective I

The course will examine developments in human rights, primarily during the twentieth century. Weekly discussions based on assigned readings will offer students an opportunity to explore such questions as: What are "human rights" and how are they different from any other rights? Where do human rights come from? Why do they change over time, and by whom and by what means are changes effected? Is there a role for the historian in explaining this process, and can the lessons of history be applied to public policy and to continuing human rights issues? The focus for our study is the formation and evolution of international human rights, but with attention paid to Canadian events to assess the relationship between domestic and global human rights innovations.

HIST 608 – Human Rights in Historical Perspective II

In this sequel to HIST 607, students will have an opportunity to pursue a primary research project on an approved topic in the history of human rights. A series of progress meetings and research consultations will lead towards a "conference" where students will present their own research and comment on their classmates' draft papers.

HIST 610 – War and Society in the Twentieth Century

This course will explore the impact of twentieth century war on the English - speaking world, especially Canada. It will introduce students to the many ways in which historians have studied the First and Second World Wars, as well as other conflicts. Our seminar presentations and research papers will sample the 'old military history' of tactics and strategy, and we will also examine the 'new military history' that focuses on the social, economic and cultural impact of war.

HIST 611 – War and Society in the Twentieth Century II

History 611 forms the research component of the course. Students will write a research paper based on primary sources on a topic chosen with the professor's consultation. The paper will be approximately 30-35 pages in length (7500-9000 words). The class will meet throughout the term to discuss the process of research and writing. Each student will also present his or her working drafts to the class for discussion. Marks will be based on the quality of constructive comment raised in each class, as well as on the final paper submitted at term's end.

HIST 612 – Indigenous Rights and Claims: A Global Perspective

This course examines the historical and political background of Indigenous rights in comparative and global perspective. It will consider the patterns of Indigenous-Newcomer relations, the nature and origins of treaties, and Indigenous protests against external incursions into traditional territories. The course will focus on developments around the world in the period after World War II, and will examine such themes as the emergence of Indigenous rights movements, the origins and status of legal claims, political accommodations and international efforts to address Indigenous aspirations. Particular attention will be paid to the development of international Indigenous organizations, coordinated protests and challenges to national governments, and the engagement of international organizations (i.e., through the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).

HIST 614 – Space, Identity and Culture: Reading in Canadian Social History

In this course you will master both classic and cutting-edge historical scholarship in Canadian Social History. You will read works that interrogate and historicize the traditional foci of social historians - class gender and race. You will read works informed by cultural theory, especially concerning the occupation of social space and the expression of experience of particularized social identities. Each week, we will meet together in seminar to discuss the substance, theoretical orientation, methodology, and historiographical significance of the assigned material. As such, active reading and constructive participation in seminar are key. In addition, you will be required to lead seminar discussions and write an historiographical paper.

HIST 620 – Early Modern History I

HIST 621 – Early Modern History II

HIST 622 – Microhistory and the Lost Peoples of Europe

This course borrows its title from the famous collection of essays edited by Edward Muir and Guido Ruggiero. The course explores how historians use narrative to (re)construct past realities. It looks closely at the uses, abuses, and limitations of microhistory as a genre and exposes students to important trends in social history. Though the bulk of the material deals with Europe in the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries, the course is methodological in nature and is intended for all graduate students of social history. Students in HIST 622 read the great microhistories including Davis' The Return of Martin Guerre, LeRoy Ladurie's Montaillou and Caranaval at Romans, Spence's The Death of Woman Wang, Ginzburg's Night Battles, and others. Through these sources students acquire a deep understanding of the historiography surrounding this genre. In addition, HIST 622 exposes students to the various non-historical theorists (sociological, anthropological, etc.) whose works inform the microhistorical method.

HIST 626 – Modern European History I

HIST 627 – Modern European History II

HIST 632 – History of the United States I

HIST 633 – History of the United States II

HIST 635 – Race in Modern History I

HIST 636 – Race in Modern History II

HIST 651 – Historians and Public Policy

HIST 653 – Public History Interpretation

HIST 660 – Transnational and Global History: Old Problems and New Directions

This course examines transnational and global historical processes, focusing on temporal and geographic scales of analysis outside of traditional national histories, and promotes linking the local and the global. It looks at global forces influencing particular societies and encourages students to place themselves outside conventional local, regional, and national boundaries, and will critically consider a number of the metanarratives that have informed and continue to inform historiography, particularly idea such as modernity, progress, and the ongoing preoccupation with the 'rise of the west'. Given these questions, and the almost endless scope of a course that purports to take the world as its focal point, weekly seminars will begin with a discussion of the possibilities offered by as well as the limits to transnational/global/world history, the various interpretative frameworks in use and their proponents as well as the challenges that transnational/global/world history poses. We will then focus on particular case studies or themes so as to promote discussion that is as much historiographical as it is historical. Such themes/case studies may include: feminism and imperialism, famine and climate change, disease and ecology, military technology and governmentally, global trade and the rise of consumer society(s), colonial knowledge and shifting ideas of race.

HIST 691A – Directed Studies

HIST 691B – Directed Studies

HIST 691C – Directed Studies

HIST 701 – Major Field Oral Qualifying Examination

HIST 704 – Major Field Written Qualifying Examination

HIST 705 – First Minor Area of Concentration

HIST 706 – Second Minor Area of Concentration

HIST 710 – Canadian History Major Field

HIST 712 – Scottish History Major Field

HIST 714 – Early Modern European History Major Field

HIST 715 – Modern European History Major Field

HIST 719 – War and Society Major Field

This field will attract those who are interested in the impact of military conflict, in conventional and non-conventional forms, on civil society. It will focus in particular on the two World Wars and the "small wars" that developed in the last part of the twentieth century, and be flexible enough to include a range of related topics across time and place that reflect the interests of faculty and students.

HIST 725 – Cold War Era History Major Field

Major field seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor. During the subsequent Spring term major field participants read a further 50 books selected by the instructor in consultation with each participant's supervisor.

HIST 726 – Medieval History Major Field

Major field seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor. During the subsequent Spring term major field participants read a further 50 books selected by the instructor in consultation with each participant's supervisor.

HIST 727 – World History Major Field

Major field seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor. During the subsequent Spring term major field participants read a further 50 books selected by the instructor in consultation with each participant's supervisor.

HIST 759 – War and Society Minor Area Seminar

HIST 760 – Canadian History Minor Area Seminar

HIST 761 – British History Minor Area Seminar

HIST 762 – Scottish History Minor Area Seminar

HIST 763 – Community Studies Minor Area Seminar

HIST 764 – Early Modern European History Minor Area Seminar

HIST 765 – Modern European History Minor Area Seminar

HIST 766 – Gender, Women and Family Minor Area Seminar

HIST 767 – Race, Class, Imperialism and Slavery Minor Area Seminar

HIST 768 – United States Minor Area Seminar

HIST 769 – International Relations Minor Area Seminar

HIST 770 – Science, Medicine and Technology Minor Area Seminar

HIST 771 – Minor Area of Concentration

This minor area is arranged between the student and a professor, and falls outside of those other minor areas enumerated in the calendar. The participants will provide the department and the Graduate Studies Office with a course name, which will appear on the student's transcript, in order to more specifically identify the minor area

HIST 775 – Cold War Era History Minor Area Seminar

Minor area seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor.

HIST 776 – Medieval History Minor Area Seminar

Minor area seminars meet bi-weekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor.

HIST 777 – World History Minor Area Seminar

Minor area seminars meet biweekly throughout the Fall and Winter terms for discussion of a reading list of 50 books selected by the instructor.