Zachary Seguin

GEOG Courses

GEOG 100 – On Becoming a Geographer

An introduction to geographic themes and methods of inquiry. The emphasis will be placed on practical skills including literature searches, field observation, scholarly debate and professional writing.

GEOG 101 – Human Geographies: People, Space and Change

An introduction to human geography through key subfields of the discipline, examining population change, the rise of cities, our relationship to nature, social inequalities, economic forms, cultural difference and environmental change at the local and global scale.

GEOG 102 – Global Environmental Systems: Processes and Change

An introductory course in the study of the energy and mass flows that impact the climate and landscape of the Earth system. There is focus on understanding processes of change and variability as well as the impacts of humans on these systems that increasingly define the Anthropocene.

GEOG 165 – Computer Cartography: Principles and Design

Focus is on the compilation and cartographic display of spatially referenced data. Topics covered include geographic coordinate systems, map projections, mapping quantitative data, terrain representation, compiling data from a variety of sources, and the production of effective maps based on established principles of cartographic design.

GEOG 181 – Designing Effective Maps

Focus is on the issues and foundations of modern digital cartography. Topics covered include geographic coordinate systems, map projections, mapping quantitative data, developing online maps, and the impact of maps on society. Students will learn computer techniques to produce effective maps based on established principles of cartographic design. [Also offered online]

GEOG 187 – Problem Solving in Geomatics

A specialized introduction to fundamental concepts and emerging trends in Geomatics and Geographic Information Science (GIS). Focus on methods and techniques of spatial data capture, management, and analysis. Introduction to programming as applied to GIS.

GEOG 201 – Fluvial Geomorphology

Emphasis on concepts related to fluvial processes, river mechanics, the relationship between environmental change and river regime. Selected topics include fluvial processes and landscape formation, flow and sediment regimes, channel processes, form and behaviour, river response to natural and anthropogenic change, and river management.

GEOG 202 – Geography of the Global Economy

An introduction to globalization of the world economy through an examination of its causes, patterns, and consequences in a variety of geographic contexts.

GEOG 203 – Environment and Development in a Global Perspective

Examines the interface between human development and the environment in a global context. Various perspectives are explored to link environmental issues to wealth, poverty, consumption, population, and economic globalization. Case studies, with an emphasis on developing countries, are used to illustrate linkages.

GEOG 206 – Human Dimensions of Natural Hazards

This course will investigate the human dimensions of the global experience with natural hazards and associated disasters. The physical nature of a wide range of geophysical and biophysical hazards will be explored, paying particular attention to: the ways in which hazards become dangerous to humans, and the pathways by which humans can either increase or decrease their vulnerability in the face of natural hazards.

GEOG 207 – Climate Change Fundamentals

Climate change is one of the most profound environmental and social issues affecting communities, nations and individuals. This course is an introduction to this global challenge, including its scientific underpinnings, history, potential impacts on natural systems and human societies around the world, and two societal responses: adaptation and greenhouse gas mitigation. Opportunities to develop sustainable resilient communities, as well as Canadian climate change policy responses, will be highlighted.

GEOG 208 – Human Dimensions of Global Climate Change

Climate change is one of the most profound environmental issues affecting society. The course is an introduction to the human dimensions of global climate change, including its scientific history, potential impacts for natural systems and human societies around the world, and the two societal responses: adaptation and greenhouse gas mitigation. Canadian climate change science, impacts and policy responses will be highlighted.

GEOG 209 – Hydroclimatology

An introduction to the fundamental processes governing climate and hydrological systems and the links between them. It starts with a discussion of basic atmospheric and hydrological processes and traces the flow of energy and water between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The water cycle is examined including evapotranspiration, precipitation, runoff and water storage in the natural reservoirs (including soil and groundwater, lakes and wetlands).

GEOG 210 – Image Interpretation and Photogrammetry

Focuses on principles of air photo interpretation and use of airphotos and high-resolution images for studies such as terrain analysis, vegetation and soil mapping, rural and urban planning, crop identification, forestry, wildlife ecology and hazard evaluation.

GEOG 212 – Japan and the Pacific Rim

Explore Japan. Learn about its culture, economy, regions, environment, trade patterns, investment and development assistance.

GEOG 215 – China: Diverse and Dynamic

Changing geographies of China are examined and explained. Patterns and processes of change will be systematically analyzed for topics such as the physical environment, resources, development policy, globalization, industrialization, urbanization, and regional development. Diverse cities and regions are compared and the integration of China into the global economy is explored.

GEOG 221 – The United States

Focuses on population shifts, urban developments, and regional economic development in the context of the nation and selected regions.

GEOG 222 – Geographical Study of Canada

An exploration of the geographical bases of Canada's regional identity. How physical, demographic, and economic geographies have combined to create unique regions within Canada.

GEOG 225 – Global Environment and Health

This course addresses the range of environmental issues that affect human health, with a global focus. This course will use a range of case studies from around the globe to address issues of measurement (of exposures and outcomes), evaluation (study designs), and policy responses.

GEOG 233 – Geography of Tourism

This course provides foundational understanding of the nature and scope of tourism geographies. In particular, students will become familiar with the significance of tourism to modern society, economy and the environment. Geographical approaches to the study of tourism and contemporary frameworks relevant to human behavior and actions in touristic landscapes will serve as the foundations to understanding tourist spaces, places and identities.

GEOG 250 – Urban and Economic Systems: Inter-City and Global Connections

Contemporary patterns of urban and economic growth and urban based development. Changing trends in urban organization at the regional, national and global scale. New systems of world cities.

GEOG 270 – Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) Knowledge Requirements

Students will gain knowledge about the requirements and constraints affecting recreational, commercial and research RPAS (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles [UAV], Unmanned Aircraft Systems [UAS]) flights for geomatics applications. Theory and conceptual factors affecting flight, remote sensing, and spatial analysis with very-high resolution data will be discussed. Students will gain knowledge about how to navigate regulatory requirements. They will learn how to link their science and research objectives with geomatics skills to mitigate risk and obtain regulatory approval for legal RPAS flights. Assignments provide a range of experiences to students that may include: applied aspects of flight campaign approval, setup, management; flight training; and integrating imagery with geographic information systems.

GEOG 271 – Earth from Space Using Remote Sensing

Remote sensing of the Earth's systems (atmosphere, land, and oceans) is introduced. The course covers the principles, physics, sensor technology, processing and applications of remote sensing in the electromagnetic spectrum.

GEOG 281 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students learn about the nature of geographic information and how to store, manipulate and analyze spatial data in a range of application areas. Students will learn underlying theory in lectures and gain a working knowledge of GIS software in lab sessions.

GEOG 293 – Approaches to Research in Human Geography

This course develops student skills in the area of research in human geography emphasizing all aspects of design, measurement and evaluation with a particular emphasis on personal transferable skills (e.g., oral and written communication, working as part of a team).

GEOG 294 – Approaches to Research in Physical Geography

Introduces skills for conducting research in physical geography. Selected techniques used in climatology, hydrology, geomorphology and/or biogeography research will be demonstrated and the principles behind the techniques will be explained. Students get hands on experience in research design, field and laboratory techniques, data assembly and the interpretation of data.

GEOG 300 – Geomorphology and the Southern Ontario Environment

Study of the origin and evolution of landforms with emphasis on southern Ontario. Analysis of geomorphic processes. Study of human impact on geomorphological landscapes. The lectures will be supplemented by field trips and field work required for term projects.

GEOG 303 – Physical Hydrology

Fundamental processes in physical hydrology are addressed. Components of the water balance are examined to determine the nature of their variation in time and space. Precipitation, interception, infiltration, groundwater and soil water processes, evapotranspiration, runoff and storage will be examined from a theoretical and practical viewpoint, and their linkages demonstrated by lab and fieldwork.

GEOG 304 – Carbon in the Biosphere

This course investigates stocks and fluxes of carbon in forests, wetlands, and lakes through directed readings and field investigations. This field-based course will focus on measurement methods, data collection and interpretation, and study design. Topics include forest biomass inventory, soil organic matter, soil carbon dioxide and methane exchange, and dissolved organic carbon.

GEOG 306 – Human Dimensions of Natural Hazards

This course will investigate the human dimensions of the global experience with natural hazards and associated disasters. The physical nature of a wide range of geophysical and biophysical hazards will be explored, paying particular attention to: the ways in which hazards become dangerous to humans, and the pathways by which humans can either increase or decrease their vulnerability in the face of natural hazards.

GEOG 307 – Societal Adaptation to Climate Change

Climate change is a pervasive factor affecting the future of society. Recognizing that dangerous climate change cannot be avoided through greenhouse gas emissions reductions alone, adaptation to climate change has emerged as a central component of global climate policy. An in depth understanding of the diverse impacts of climate change on communities, economic sectors and society will provide a foundation for examining adaptation strategies to build resilience to accelerated climate change. Examples will drawn from multiple sectors in both developed and developing world contexts, with an emphasis on solutions and the limits to adaptation.

GEOG 308 – Human Dimensions of Global Climate Change

Climate change is one of the most profound environmental issues affecting society. The course is an introduction to the human dimensions of global climate change, including its scientific history, potential impacts for natural systems and human societies around the world, and the two societal responses: adaptation and greenhouse gas mitigation. Canadian climate change science, impacts and policy responses will be highlighted.

GEOG 309 – Physical Climatology

Principles of physical climatology with emphasis on regional and global change and variability. Topics include radiation and energy balances, general circulation patterns, synoptic development and micro-climatology.

GEOG 310 – Geodesy and Surveying

Concepts of geodesy and surveying, Earth's gravity field and the geoid, and measurement techniques applied to geomatics are examined. Field studies include the use of the level, the total station, and GPS for doing distance and angle measurements, leveling, traversing and topographic surveying.

GEOG 311 – Local Development in a Global Context

The course examines the ability of local communities to influence their development trajectory. The roles and potential for collaboration among public, private, and third sector partners are explored. Social, environmental, and economic goals are interconnected within a sustainable development framework.

GEOG 316 – Multivariate Statistics

The theory and application of multivariate statistics, with particular emphasis upon the use of the computer.

GEOG 318 – Spatial Analysis

Advanced quantitative analysis in a spatial context. A selection of techniques from sampling, geostatistics, point pattern analysis and cluster detection, spatial classification, and spatial data mining.

GEOG 319 – Economic Analyses for Regional Planning

Practical application and critical appraisal of regional analysis techniques used by planners, economic developers and consultants. Problem based approaches to understanding the strength and leverage of business and industrial sectors, projection and forecasting, employment and demographic trends, investment decision-making and cost benefit analysis.

GEOG 320 – The Cryosphere

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the cryosphere and cryosphere-atmosphere interactions. Topics covered include the material and thermodynamic properties of snow and ice, the role of the cryosphere in weather and climate, and the response of the cryosphere to climate change (past, present and future). Students will be introduced to, and experiment with, snow and ice process models. [formerly: GEOG 419]

GEOG 323 – Perspectives on International Tourism

The character, problems of, and prospects of tourism are examined through consideration of tourism in a variety of countries and regions, both developed and developing. Topics include the nature and significance of tourism; economic, environmental and social impacts of tourism; and costs and benefits of tourism to destination areas.

GEOG 325 – Geographies of Health

A critical examination of major themes related to the distribution, diffusion, determinants and delivery of health and health care with a particular emphasis on the roles of space, place and environment.

GEOG 333 – Recreation Geography

Implications of existing and potential recreation supplies and demands. Topics include recreational travel, site capability, economic and ecological impact models and behavioural aspects of amenity resources.

GEOG 336 – Spaces of Citizenship: Identities and Inequality

This course uses international case studies to explore the geographies of citizenship, above and below the scale of the state. It examines how acts of citizenship affect people's sense of identity, community, well-being, and belonging.

GEOG 340 – Settlements of Rural Canada

An historical perspective is used to explore the shifting identities of Canada's dispersed and nucleated rural settlements. Rural growth, decline and restructuring are examined, including a discussion of how various intervention approaches stimulate changes.

GEOG 349 – Urban Form and Internal Spatial Structure

An examination of the major factors giving rise to distinctive styles of urban spatial organization. Focus moves from city-wide scale to subareas/sectors - inner city, housing, retailing, etc., with emphasis on understanding and planning for the dynamics of complex environments. Applied issues or problems are dealt with throughout the course.

GEOG 351 – Geography of Transportation

Focuses on Canadian transportation systems and issues and is organized into three modules: links between transportation and regional economic development, urban land use - transportation interactions, and sustainable transportation. Approximately one-quarter of the course focuses on analytic techniques including network analysis, category analysis, and the gravity model. Particular attention is paid to trends in air travel and related issues.

GEOG 353 – Retail Location

Examines retail location at both the inter and intra-urban scales. Emphasis is placed on the underlying processes that give rise to retail structure, techniques of site selection and public sector involvement in retail location.

GEOG 356 – Resources Management

Reviews selected theories, methods, and terminology related to economic, behavioural, institutional and decision-making aspects of resources and environmental problems.

GEOG 360 – Environment and Behaviour

An introduction to the study of human behaviours related to natural and built environments. Variations in environmental cognition, thought, perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, decisions and behaviours are explored at multiple scales (from individual to societal). The importance of social and cultural contexts in environmental decision-making is traced, using examples drawn from fields such as environmental psychology, urban and regional geography, natural hazards, environmental policy, and behavioural geography.

GEOG 361 – Food Systems and Sustainability

This course examines dimensions of food systems sustainability and food security, from production to consumption, from local to global scales, in the Global North and South. Specific themes covered in the course include technological and genetic change in food production, resource depletion and wider environmental impacts of the industrial food system, and policy, market-oriented, and civil society initiatives to bring about change in the food system, including organic production and localizing food systems. [formerly: GEOG/ERS 461] [Offered online only.]

GEOG 365 – Study Abroad

Study abroad for academic transfer credit under an Environmental Studies Exchange Program during a fall term.

GEOG 366 – Study Abroad

Study abroad for academic transfer credit under an Environmental Studies Exchange Program during a winter term.

GEOG 368 – Conservation/Resource Management of the Built Environment

Consideration of the constraints and guidelines that an application of the principles of ecology places on the planning and management of resources within urban spaces and the implications for urban design. The theory and history of this subject will be discussed together with urban ecomanagement, the management of waste, urban open space and parks, rehabilitated sites, and environmentally sensitive areas.

GEOG 371 – Advanced Remote Sensing Techniques

Advanced image processing techniques of digital remote sensing measurements (e.g. radar systems, optical and infrared systems) from ground, aircraft and satellite instrument systems. Techniques are applied to the study of physical and human environments.

GEOG 372 – Waterloo in Switzerland -- Lausanne

Study abroad for academic transfer credit under an Environmental Studies Exchange Program during a fall term.

GEOG 373 – Waterloo in Switzerland -- Lausanne

Study abroad for academic transfer credit under an Environmental Studies Exchange Program during a winter term.

GEOG 374 – Special Topics in Geography

These courses allow for additions to the program on a short-term basis, and for the development of future permanent courses.

GEOG 381 – Advanced Geographic Information Systems

Students learn theoretical and operational approaches to advanced spatial analysis using geographical information systems. Emphasis is placed on the use of automation procedures using models and programming to address a variety of topics that may include but are not limited to digital terrain modeling, suitability analysis, network analysis, and cell-based models. The domain of spatial problems explored may vary by instructor.

GEOG 387 – Spatial Databases

This course focuses on design and development of a GIS database. It addresses theoretical issues regarding data models used in GIS and data modeling techniques used in designing spatial databases. It considers the processing required to input data from a variety of sources and clean and edit a multi-theme database and introduces students to creation and use of internet map services.

GEOG 391 – Field Research

Field research course in which a specific area will be analyzed from a geographic point of view. Individual or group analysis of specific field problems.

GEOG 393 – Approaches to Research in Human Geography

Introduces skills for conducting human geography research and the basic principles and methods of analysis. These skills include problem identification, research design, research ethics, and the assembly and interpretation of evidence.

GEOG 394 – Approaches to Research in Physical Geography

Introduces skills for conducting research in physical geography. Selected techniques used in climatology, hydrology, geomorphology and/or biogeography research will be demonstrated and the principles behind the techniques will be explained. Students get hands on experience in research design, field and laboratory techniques, data assembly and the interpretation of data.

GEOG 404 – Soil Ecosystem Dynamics

This course examines the role of soil in the environment, its importance as a natural resource in agricultural and forest productivity, and the effects on soil resources as a result of different management practices. It is divided into three sections: 1) introduction to soil composition, formation, and physical, chemical and biological characteristics of soil; 2) soil degradation and management approaches to rehabilitation; 3) soil pollution and the role of soil in maintaining environmental integrity.

GEOG 405 – Wetlands

Basic concepts on the distribution, classification, development, hydrology, biogeochemistry, and ecology of wetlands with an emphasis on temperate and boreal/subarctic systems. Human impacts, restoration and reclamation of wetlands are considered with the view of wetlands as functional ecosystems.

GEOG 407 – Environmental Hydrology

An interdisciplinary course that explores ecological processes that are linked to physical hydrology. Particular focus is on the storage and movement of water, solutes and nutrients within selected ecosystems and the ecological impacts of human activities on the ecohydrological system.

GEOG 408 – Earth's Future Climates

This course provides students with experience using numerical models to understand changes in Earth's climate. Building on their knowledge of the fundamental physical processes governing the climate system, students will construct, apply and evaluate a hierarchy of climate models (from simple energy balance models to full ocean-atmosphere General Circulation Models). The predictive ability of climate models, and their validation, will be considered. The different types of uncertainty inherent in climate projections will be explained and the implications assessed.

GEOG 409 – Energy Balance Climatology

A field and lecture course including the radiation and energy balances of various surfaces, the principles of turbulent energy exchange, and the biotic response to the energy environment. These concepts will be illustrated through the collection and examination of field data. The student will be responsible for presentation of a seminar on an assigned topic as well as presentation of the results of research incorporating data collected at the University of Waterloo weather station.

GEOG 410 – Global Navigation Satellite Systems

The course covers the essence of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), including reference systems, satellite orbits, satellite signals, observables, mathematical models for positioning, data processing, transformation, and applications.

GEOG 411 – Global and Local Dimensions of Industrial Restructuring

Understanding the implications of globalization for the local and regional economy through examining technological change, multinational corporations, employment and institutions. Course work focuses on analysis of the restructuring of specific industries in the southern Ontario region.

GEOG 415 – Economic Geography Project

Economic geography concepts and techniques are applied to the study of a current economic or social issue facing a local, regional, or national jurisdiction.

GEOG 418 – Cold Region Climates

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the Arctic climate system. A variety of topics are considered including: key components and processes of the energy and water budgets; the current state of the cryosphere; the relationship between the cryosphere and past variability; the role of the Arctic in the global climate system; and the prediction of future changes using global climate models. Various observational perspectives on the climate system, including conventional measurements, atmospheric reanalysis, and remote sensing are presented.

GEOG 419 – The Cryosphere

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the cryosphere and cryosphere-atmosphere interactions. Topics covered include the material and thermodynamic properties of snow and ice, the role of the cryosphere in weather and climate, and the response of the cryosphere to climate change (past, present and future). Students will be introduced to, and experiment with, snow and ice process models.

GEOG 420 – Ice Sheets and Glaciers

This course will introduce the basics of glaciology, with a focus on climate change and physical processes. Key areas covered by the course include glacial mass change in a warming climate, ice dynamics, various spatial and temporal scales of glaciation, and geomorphological features caused by glaciation.

GEOG 423 – Sustainable Tourism

This course examines sustainability issues relevant to tourism. In particular, conceptual and practical examples related to economic, environmental, and social/cultural sustainability of tourism are critically appraised, combined with reviews of policy and institutional effects on sustainability practices. The course also focuses on best practices in sustainable tourism within government, non-government and business operations.

GEOG 426 – Geographies of Development

Examines international development theories and practice, emphasizing the interactions between social, economic, political and environmental dimensions at the micro- and macro-scales. Selected case studies illustrate divergent outcomes of development and the contested process that development represents.

GEOG 428 – Spatial Demography

This course develops the capacity of students to apply methods of spatial demography. Spatial demography refers to the statistical study of human population using spatial methods for analyzing demographic data. It can provide insights into the understanding of geographic variations of population's characteristics, which in turn can help to make better plans in building the environment. Through this course, students will learn the basic concepts, data sources, data issues, methodologies, and applications of spatial demography.

GEOG 429 – Global Food Systems

Examines the global nature of food systems from production to consumption, including both industrial and alternative models. Specific themes covered in the course include technological change in agriculture, corporate concentration, international agricultural trade, food aid, fair trade, and organic production in the Global North and South.

GEOG 430A – Field Research in Regional Geography

Detailed analysis of a selected region with major emphasis upon a field examination of the region (several weeks duration). Offering dependent upon faculty availability and student enrolment. For additional information on duration, itinerary and travel costs of course offerings, contact the Geography Undergraduate Advisor.

GEOG 430B – Field Research in Regional Geography

Detailed analysis of a selected region with major emphasis upon a field examination of the region (several weeks duration). Offering dependent upon faculty availability and student enrolment. For additional information on duration, itinerary and travel costs of course offerings, contact the Geography Undergraduate Advisor.

GEOG 430C – Field Research in Regional Geography

Detailed analysis of a selected region with major emphasis upon a field examination of the region (several weeks duration). Offering dependent upon faculty availability and student enrolment. For additional information on duration, itinerary and travel costs of course offerings, contact the Geography Undergraduate Advisor.

GEOG 432 – Health, Environment, and Planning

This course examines the relationship between the environment (built/physical, economic, social, political and natural aspects) and population health. It focuses on conceptual and empirical links among current environment-health issues such as air quality, active transportation, injury prevention, climate change, and mental well-being. Emphasis is placed on the role of urban planners in collaboration with allied professionals (e.g., public health, engineering, law enforcement, architecture) in creating and maintaining healthy built environments to improve population health with a focus on key health issues.

GEOG 436 – Feminist Economic Geography: Gender, Identities and Social Change

Using a combination of lecture and seminar, this course examines feminist economic geography's framing of: (1) the gendered division of labour (2) (un)paid care work (3) how different embodied actors engage with the economy and (4) feminist critiques of capitalism and responses to economic crisis.

GEOG 450 – Changing Form and Structure of Metropolitan Canada

Selected analysis of processes, problems and planning issues associated with the internal growth and spatial reorganization of Canadian metropolitan areas. Three or four topics are chosen for detailed investigation. These will vary from year to year.

GEOG 452 – Resource Management Project

Concepts and techniques of resources management and institutional analysis are applied to the study of a current resource or environmental management issue.

GEOG 453 – Urban Stormwater Management

Urban stormwater runoff affects the water quality, water quantity, habitat and biological resources, public health and aesthetic appearance of urban waterways. This course reviews the physical and chemical processes, environmental assessment techniques and best management practices related to stormwater management in the urban systems.

GEOG 454 – Retail Landscapes

A critical examination of the processes that govern retail landscapes in the city and its countryside. Emphasis is placed on understanding the forces that drive the creation, maintenance, and evolution of these settings at a variety of scales. Small-group work provides an opportunity to apply this understanding in a real-world context.

GEOG 456 – Transforming Canadian Resource Management

Past and present approaches to resource management in Canada are examined in order to design the transformations needed for a sustainable Canadian future.

GEOG 459 – Energy and Sustainability

Renewable and non-renewable energy supply systems are compared using economic and environmental measures. Consumption trends and conservation options are considered at the local and global level. Projects are used to demonstrate the economic and environmental challenges in the design of a sustainable energy system.

GEOG 461 – Food Systems and Sustainability

This course examines dimensions of food systems sustainability and food security, from production to consumption, from local to global scales, in the Global North and South. Specific themes covered in the course include technological and genetic change in food production, resource depletion and wider environmental impacts of the industrial food system, and policy, market-oriented, and civil society initiatives to bring about change in the food system, including organic production and localizing food systems.

GEOG 462 – Global Food and Agricultural Politics

This course examines the global food and agriculture system. Specific themes to be covered include political and governance issues related to the Green Revolution, global food corporations, agricultural trade liberalization, food aid, international agricultural assistance, the global agro-chemical industry, and agricultural bio-technology.

GEOG 471 – Remote Sensing Project

Digital image analysis for resource mapping and evaluation using remote sensing data. Topics range from initial data selection to final map production and assessment. Using commercial image analysis software, students will analyse data for a selected area and produce a portfolio of results. In addition, they will undertake a literature review on a selected topic and present highlights of the review at an end-of-term mini-conference.

GEOG 474 – Special Topics in Geography

These courses allow for additions to the program on a short-term basis, and for the development of future permanent courses.

GEOG 475 – Independent Study of Selected Topics

Individual study of specific topics not covered in other courses. Students must not register for this course until a faculty member has agreed to supervise the study and the student has developed a brief outline to be filed with the Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies.

GEOG 481 – Geographic Information Systems Project

The development, implementation, and presentation of a response to a set of GIS related project requirements is the focus of this course. Students work in small teams to enhance and develop their abilities to work with GIS and related spatial technologies and analytical methods in an advanced project setting. The nature of the project requirements and themes varies with faculty and student strengths and interests. Projects may emphasize development of software applications, use of programming, or advanced GIS analysis methods, and draw from theme areas such as environment studies and management, human and physical geography, or planning.

GEOG 483 – Geoweb and Location-Based Services

A critical approach to the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Geospatial Web and location-based services. Topics covered include Volunteered Geographic Information, open data, locational privacy, and mobile data collection. Assignments are used to experiment with course concepts.

GEOG 487 – Management Issues in Geographic Information Systems

Built around a set of key issues in the management of Geographic Information Systems. Focuses on middle management concerns and covers topics including GIS needs assessment, benchmarking, the law and spatial data, spatial data warehousing, multi-user GIS modelling and GIS application development. Uses of GIS in both public and private sector organizations are covered.

GEOG 490A – Honours Thesis Preparation

Preparatory work and first draft of thesis.

GEOG 490B – Honours Thesis Completion

Completion of thesis.

GEOG 600 – Seminar in Spatial Data Handling

An overview of concepts and methodologies in several aspects of spatial data handling: cartography, geographic information systems, remote sensing, spatial statistics. Analysis of spatial data sets. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 601 – Environmental Change and Remote

Principles and techniques of analyzing environmental change from long time-series of remotely sensed imagery are examined. Case studies include the impacts of climate on sea ice and the role of natural and human-induced stress on tropical coral reefs. Prerequisites: Geography 603 or equivalent. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 602 – Remote Sensing of Cold Regions

This course focuses on the extraction of hydrologically-relevant parameters from remote sensing that are germane to cold regions such as snowfall, snow cover, glaciers & ice caps, lake and river ice, permafrost, and seasonally frozen ground. The determination of hydrological parameters in the liquid and vapour phases such precipitiation, soild moisture, surface water, and evaporation/evapotranspiration from remote sensing, as well as the integration of remote sensing data into hydrological models are also covered. Prerequisites: UW undergraduates: GEOG 271, 371, 471 or undergraduate Geomatics degree. Undergraduate Geography degree with suitable remote sensing experience. Students with no remote sensing experience but strong GIS experience are required to take a 675 Directed Reading course entitled "Remote Sensing Analysis" prior to enrolment in 602. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 603 – Remote Sensing and Earth System Science

This course will explore how remote sensing is used and in concert with empirical or physically-based models to help us better understand Earth system processes from the local to global scales. Students will learn how remote sensing measurements are coupled with radiative transfer models, energy and mass balance models and spatial analytical models from different components of the Earth system. Examples will be drawn from the hydrologic and carbon cycles from the human built enviornment. Prerequisites: UW undergraduates: Geog 271, 371, 471 or undergraduate Geomatics degree. Undergraduate degree with suitable remote sensing experience. Students with no remote sensing experience but strong GIS experience are required to take a 675 Directed Reading course entitled "Remote Sensing Analysis" prior to enrolment in 603. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 604 – Spatial Statistics

An overview of spatial statistics and their use in geographic studies. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 605 – Spatial Information Technology, Globalization and International Development

This course considers the role of GIS and RS technologies for problem solving and planning decision support in developing countries. Topics covered include the globalisation of information technology and its transfer from developed to developing countries and general aspects of the spatial information technology industry and its relationship to society. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 606 – Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Introduction to GIS concepts and to their application in geographic studies using basic GIS software. This course is designed for students with little or no prior experience with GIS. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 607 – Applications of Geographic Information Systems

Current applications of GIS and related technologies in geographic research and environmental management are examined through discussions and individual student projects. This course is designed for students with previous GIS experience. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 608 – Urban Remote Sensing

An overview of high-resolution remote sensing systems and advanced study of image segmentation, data fusion, feature extraction, and change detection algorithms. Topics include 3D city modeling, land use/cover classification, urban heat island study, urban sprawl monitoring, and risk mapping. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 609 – GIS and Spatial Decision Support for Planning and Resource Management

This course introduces students to key theories, concepts and techniques that have been developed recently to improve the design support capabilities of spatial information systems. Topics covered include participatory GIS, group-based spatial decision support systems, and the integration of multi-criteria analysis (MCA) methods with GIS to facilitate decision-making in planning. *eligible for MES

GEOG 611 – Industrial Location Theory and Concepts

Examination of industrial location theory, and themes concerning the role of manufacturing in the space-economy. Factors of location will be considered as will the way that manufacturing has led to spatial disparity on international, regional and local levels.

GEOG 613 – Innovation and Economic Development in Cities and Regions

This course offers a critical examination of the innovation, knowledge creation and circulation, and governance processes that underpin contemporary economic development in cities and regions. Strategies, policies and programs that are intended to support and promote innovation and economic development in urban and regional economies are analyzed.

GEOG 615 – Community Economic Development

Community Economic Development is a field of theory, process and practice that is concerned with understanding the forces shaping communities and finding sustainable local solutions to economic needs. This seminar course will examine topics such as capacity-building, asset-based strategies, social capital, poverty-alleviation, social enterprises and co-operatives, and comprehensive community initiatives, using international and local examples and case studies.

GEOG 616 – Multivariate Statistics

Theory and application of multivariate statistics, regression and correlation analysis, factor analysis, discriminant analysis and grouping analysis, with emphasis on the use of the computer. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 619 – Analytical Tools for Economic Development

The course provides an overview and hands-on application of the quantitative analytical methods regularly used by professionals in economic development and related fields. Emerging analytical tools and techniques are explored.

GEOG 620 – Seminar in Human Geography

This seminar will provide a broad survey of the interdisciplinary scope of human geography and investigate a wide range of human/society dynamics, theoretical positions and methodologies. The format of inquiry will be that of a seminar wherein students conduct original research and exchange results through ongoing reports and discussions.

GEOG 621 – Metropolitan Form and Structure in Canada

A seminar on selected topics of particular relevance to understanding and planning for contemporary processes of metropolitan change in Canada. Major topics represent an interrelated set of exogenous forces, (globalization, economic restructuring, technological innovation and immigration and demographic shift), and endogenous structural responses, (central city decline, revitalization, dispersed styles of suburban development and new urbanist and ecologically sustainable styles of planned intervention).

GEOG 624 – Human Activity and Travel Behaviour

An exploration of observed patterns of human activity and travel, underlying decision-making processes, data collection methodologies, and associated impacts on environment and health.

GEOG 625 – Qualitative Methods in Geography

This course is designed to investigate the range of qualitative research methods (research tools) employed by human geographers and explore the methodological justifications (philosophical or theoretical underpinnings) for using this type of research approach. Qualitative methods attempt to interpret meaning as opposed to purely measuring phenomena. The focus of qualitative research is not descriptive measurement and prediction of phenomena, as offered by statistical description/analysis, but is more attuned to examining subjective understandings and the interpretation of meaning (hermeneutics). This course will examine and evaluate the range of research tools comprising qualitative methods including: various interviewing methods, participant observation, ethnography, case study methods and dicourse analysis. It will also engage with the theoretical debates and philosophical approaches that underpin qualitative research.

GEOG 634 – Selected Topics in Regional Studies

Detailed study of physical, cultural, economic and political geography of a specified world region. (a) Europe (b) Mediterranean (c) Africa (d) Soviet Union (e) East Asia (f) Caribbean (g) Canada (h) North America.

GEOG 635 – International Development: Theories and Practice

This course emphasizes both theoretical and conceptual frameworks, techniques, practices and methods for analysis of development, focusing in particular on the development - environment interface and questions of sustainability.

GEOG 637 – Cultural Geography

This course will engage with the parameters of cultural geography from varying perspectives, which might include origins, evolution, impacts of the cultural turn, and future directions.

GEOG 638 – Sustainable Tourism

This course examines sustainability issues relevant to tourism. Conceptual and practical examples related to economic, environmental, and social/cultural sustainability of tourism are critically appraised, combined with reviews of policy and institutional effects on sustainability practices. The course also focuses on best practices in sustainable tourism within government, non-government and private sector.

GEOG 639 – Food Systems and Sustainability

The course examines emerging and existing sustainable food systems from a North American and EU perspective. Topics may include: technology, nature and society; policy dimensions in North American and the EU; knowledge and power; spaces of consumption; the moral economy; new urbanism and food planning; and, food networks such as commodity chains and fairly traded food.

GEOG 640 – Seminar in Physical Geography

Basic concepts related to temporal and spatial scales together with variability as they directly affect data collection and analysis. Leading edge research related to selected sub-disciplines of physical geography will be critically discussed. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 641 – Climate Change: Physical Science Basis

The course examines the interactive physical, biological and geochemical processes responsible for and resulting from climate change, including anthropogenic influences on these processes. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 642 – Micrometeorology

Advanced study of boundary-layer meteorology. Energy balance regimes for complex surfaces are examined. The theory of turbulent and radiant transfer is studied using field data collected during the course. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 643 – Dynamic Geomorphology

An overview of current issues and methodologies in geomorphology with special emphasis on processes operating in fluvial, glacial, periglacial or coastal environments. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 644 – Applied Geomorphology

An examination of the way in which human activities modify landscapes and the impacts of government policy and planning with respect to landscape change. The role of the geomorphologist in landscape rehabilitation. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 645 – Fluvial & Glaciofluvial Sediment Transport

Laboratory (hydraulic) models and sediment transport theory are emphasized in the analysis of modern and ancient (Pleistocene) landforms of fluvial and glaciofluvial origin. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 646 – Hydrology

Overview of hydrological processes with emphasis on Canadian examples related to the hydrologic cycle, surface hydrology, groundwater hydrology, and measurement techniques. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 647 – Recent Advances in Wetland Studies

Selected topics on the distribution, classification, functional dynamics, and ecosystem structure of wetlands. A scientific basis for wetlands management is emphasized. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 648 – Paleolimnology

This course examines the use of stratigraphic records from lakes to reconstruct environmental change. Topics include sediment coring techniques, radiometric dating methods, analysis of physical, geochemical and biological indicators, and case studies demonstrating applications to address scientific and management questions. Practical experience is gained from a lake sediment coring field trip and subsequent laboratory analyses. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 649 – Hydrology of Cold Regions

This course provides an overview of the hydrology of cold regions. Physical processes are emphasized, but hydrological modeling, and geochemistry are included where appropriate. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 651 – Hydroecology for Freshwater Ecosystem Management

This course examines the interaction in both space and time between hydrological processes and lacustrine environments. Applications to freshwater ecosystem management are explored.

GEOG 652 – Climate Prediction, Modeling and Scenarios

Computer models of the physical climate system are essential tools for investigating future climate change. This course will introduce students to the basic formulation of these models, and their strengths and limitations. Inter-linkages between climate modeling and mitigation and adaptation policy agendas is reviewed and critiqued. The types of climate modeling experiments peformed with such models and scenarios will be reviewed. The latest projections of future climate on a variety of temporal and spatial scales will be presented and evaluated. *eligible for MES

GEOG 653 – Land Use and the Carbon Cycle

This course examines contemporary theories, approaches, and technologies used to study coupled natural-human systems at the intersection of land-use and land-cover change, land management, and the carbon cycle. Topics covered include measurement and modelling techniques to improve carbon accounting, the effects of land use and land management on carbon storage and flux, and international and national policy frameworkds influencing carbon sequestration and climate change mitigation. *eligible for MES

GEOG 654 – Applied Biogeochemistry

This course focuses on ecological and biogeochemical processes that are linked to the hydrological cycle and how these relate tothe management of natural resources. The objectives of this interdisciplinary course are to explore topics that integrate ecosystem processes with physical hydrology, and examine the impacts of human activities on the ecohydrological system. Therefore the focus of this course is on the storage and movement of water, solutes and nutrients within selected ecosystems, considering the ecological consequences of human activit. *eligible for MES

GEOG 655 – Snow Hydrology

This course examines the processes controlling the spatial and temporal changes in snowcover, and the role of snow in Canada's hydrological system. Applications to water resources, hydrological prediction and terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems will be considered.

GEOG 660 – Perspectives in Resource and Environmental Management

Current research and practice in resource and environmental management. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 661A – Applied Studies in Hydrology and the Environment 1

This applied hydrology course involves defining, designing and conducting research on the hydrology and/or water quality of a specific environmental setting. Drawing on strengths and interests of students, the field and laboratory activities in this course typically involve collection, analysis and reporting of primary data. The Fall-term (661A) focuses on literature review, problem definition, methodological design and data collection; the Winter-term (661B) includes analysis, interpretation and write-up suitable for publication in a refereed journal. Group work is typically involved. *eligible for MES

GEOG 661B – Applied Studies in Hydrology and the Environment 2

This course is a continuation of GEOG 661A/PLAN661A. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 664 – Political Ecology: Nature, Society and Sustainability

Readings, discussions and case study analysis draw attention to the intersection of political-economy and ecological analysis, and contested understandings of environmental change, livelihoods and sustainability. Topics may include communities and conservation, knowledge systems and power, ecological change, property rights and institutions, social movements, and methods. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 665 – Environmental Planning Theory and Practice

An interdisciplinary approach to environmental planning. Focuses on the socio-economic, planning, environmental science, design, and decision-making theories and methods utilized in environmental planning theory and practice. Regional and local case studies and studio projects will be used to demonstrate professional practice issues and techniques. Recommended: A senior level course in ecology, environmental science, landscape architecture or equivalent. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 666 – Ecosystem Approach to Park Planning

An ecological approach to planning national and provincial parks, focusing on system planning, master planning and park administration. Examination of the theory and practice of parks planning, utilizing ecological concepts. Recommended: a senior undergrad or graduate ecology course. Estimated additional field trip cost to student: $30.00 *eligible for MES

GEOG 668 – Environmental Assessment

Techniques and technicalities covered in the first part of the course include legal aspects, teamwork, data collection and manipulation, public participation, and cost benefit analysis. These topics are followed by case histories considered from the perspective of proponent, public, consultant and government. Finally, the ethics and politics of environmental impact assessment are reviewed. Students are required to participate in a group case study on a current impact assessment issue. Estimated additional field trip cost to student: $30.00. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 669 – Energy Sustainability

Renewable and non-renewable energy supply systems are compared using economic and environmental measures. Consumption trends, conservation options and choices are considered at the household, community and global scales. Projects are used to demonstrate the economic and environmental challenges in the design of sustainable energy systems. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 671 – Contemporary Perspectives on Tourism

This course will introduce participants to a variety of topics and research methods through presentations made by active researchers from Canada and abroad. *eligible for MES

GEOG 672 – Human Ecology of Stressed Environments

An examination of socioeconomic-biophysical system interactions emphasizing multi- and transdisciplinary perspectives such as human ecology, health, ecosystems, and complexity. Students normally focus on one particular problem and region to illustrate concepts and methods. *eligible for MES

GEOG 673 – International Perspectives on Resource and Environmental Management

An overview of issues, problems and concepts in international resource and environmental management. The complex nature of ecological/biophysical, economic, and sociocultural aspects of resource management will be explored, with particular emphasis placed on tracing challenges experienced in developing countries. *eligible for MES

GEOG 674 – Climate and Society

This course examines how weather and climate influence human systems, and the international trend twoard improved climate information. The emphasis is on developing competence in using analytical tools to understand the direct and indirect impatcts of weather and climate on human activities and economic sectors. *eligible for MES.

GEOG 675 – Selected Topics in Geography

Topic(s) to be negotiated on an individual basis with faculty members. An outline for this course, approved by the professor in charge, must be submitted to the Program Director, within three weeks of registration.

GEOG 676 – Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation

This course examines the impacts of changing climate on natural and human systems and focuses on the capacity of societies to adjust to, plan for and cope with changing climate and environmental conditions. *eligible for MES

GEOG 677 – Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction

This course explores the complex links between climate change and natural hazards, and related disasters, including disaster risk reduction as an adaptation strategy. Emphasis is placed on examining these concepts in a developing country context. *eligible for

GEOG 678 – Climate Change Governance: From Global Treaties to Local Innovation

This course explores the theories behind, and practical approaches to, the multi-level governance of climate change. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol, national climate action plans and local innovation are viewed through the lenses of legitimacy, effectiveness, and participation. Finally, we consider the challenge of transformative change, and the possibility of finding synergies among climate change responses and other pressing social and environmental priorities.

GEOG 679 – Climate Change Mitigation

This course examines the anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas emissions and the range of strategies to reduce these emissions and to enhance carbon sequestration. The policy frameworks governing climate change mitigation are critically appraised from geopolitical, economic and ethics perspectives. This course also considers the potential role of climate remediation strategies.

GEOG 683 – Geoweb and Location-Based Services

A critical approach to the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Geospatial Web and location-based services. Topics covered include Volunteered Geographic Information, open data, locational privacy, and mobile data collection. Assignments are used to experiment with course concepts.

GEOG 685 – Theory of Local Economic Development

This course focuses on economic development for regions, communities and municipalities. We examine organizational structures and strategies that a community may employ to increase its capacity to control its destiny. Topics include: strategic economic planning, information management, partnerships, internet opportunities, entrepreneurship, incubators, tourism, sustainable development and healthy community initiatives. Finally, we critique various evaluation methods.

GEOG 690 – Geographic Thought and Methodology

An analysis of changing methods and philosophy of geographic research with emphasis on problem formulation and the design and evaluation of geographic research.

GEOG 691 – Graduate Student and Faculty Seminar in Geography

Participation in departmental seminars; invited presentations by guest speakers, program faculty and students. Graded on a Cr/NCr basis

GEOG 692 – International Study

The aim of this course is to provide academic credit for a foreign academic learning experience.This will take one of the following formats: study with a foreign expert, a specialized graduate course taken at a foreign institution, or a research/study project abroad conducted under the guidance of an approved advisor. In all instances the plan of study must be approved before a student leaves and in each case a final approved report must be submitted.

GEOG 693 – Human Geography Special Topics Course

Seminar topics offered one time only, or to introduce a potential permanent course within the designated subject area.

GEOG 694 – Environmental Management Special Topics Course

Seminar topics offered one time only, or to introduce a potential permanent course within the designated subject area.

GEOG 695 – Geomatics Special Topics Course

Seminar topics offered one time only, or to introduce a potential permanent course within the designated subject area.

GEOG 696 – Environmental Science Special Topics Course

Seminar topics offered one time only, or to introduce a potential permanent course within the designated subject area.