Zachary Seguin

DRAMA Courses

DRAMA 100 – Introduction to Theatre

This course introduces students to the processes of text-based theatre creation and production. Students produce an existing play text by developing and implementing an original conceptual approach. Prior experience in theatre-making is not required.

DRAMA 101A – Introduction to the Theatre 1

Introductory study of the theatre as a major art form. Selected plays as produced in their historical contexts. Contributions of the actor, designer and technician to theatrical production.

DRAMA 101B – Introduction to the Theatre 2

An extension of the studies described in 101A.

DRAMA 102 – Introduction to Performance

This workshop course introduces students to the creative processes of performance in a range of formal and informal settings. Emphasis is placed on the student's development as a performer. Prior performance experience is not required.

DRAMA 200 – Theatre and Performance in Context

Students experience, analyze, and interpret a range of works of theatre and performance. Close attention is paid to the original circumstances in which these works were produced, the ways in which they have reflected and influenced the communities that produced them, and their relevance to current performance practice and research.

DRAMA 206 – Production Participation 1

Students work with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to explore and develop basic proficiency in specific areas of performance creation. Areas include research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 207 – Production Participation 2

Students work with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to explore and develop basic proficiency in specific areas of performance creation. Areas include research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 220 – Performance Studies

This workshop course in performance studies explores performance as a way of knowing. It investigates performance as artistic practice and as a means of understanding historical, social and cultural practices, including drama/theatre texts, poetry, narratives and texts of everyday life.

DRAMA 221 – Performing Text

Students explore techniques to analyze, interpret, and perform texts.

DRAMA 222 – Performing the Body

Students explore techniques to access and develop the body as a resource for performance.

DRAMA 243 – Technical Production 1

Students develop basic proficiency in the technical elements of live theatre and performance production, including carpentry, lighting, projection, sound, wardrobe, and properties. Students apply these concepts in a departmental production.

DRAMA 244 – Technical Production 2

Students develop intermediate proficiency in the technical elements of live theatre and performance production, including carpentry, lighting, projection, sound, wardrobe, and properties. Students apply these concepts in a departmental production.

DRAMA 246 – Design for Performance

Students explore historical and current perspectives on the principles of design for performance.

DRAMA 248 – Management for the Arts

Students explore a broad range of arts management concepts. Assignments take students' individual interests into account.

DRAMA 250 – Performance German I

This course focuses on improving the student's oral skills through the preparation and performance of a German play. Students also learn about the theoretical and technical aspects of theatre production.

DRAMA 278 – Theatre and Technology

Students explore the development of theatre technologies and their significance in historical and current performance contexts.

DRAMA 280 – Theatre and Performance in Canada

Students explore theatre and performance in Canada in its historical, political, and cultural contexts.

DRAMA 282 – Gender and Performance

Students explore representations of gender on stage, in the media, and in politics.

DRAMA 284 – Site-Specific Performance

Students explore performance sites as resources for creation.

DRAMA 286 – Early English Theatre

Students explore the early development and continuing relevance of English language theatre and performance practices.

DRAMA 288 – Language, Theatre, and Performance

Students explore the relationship between language and meaning in historical and contemporary theatre and performance.

DRAMA 300 – Theories of Theatre and Performance

Students study and critique a range of existing works of theatre and performance in the context of related commentary, paying close attention to concepts of knowledge, experience, and positionality.

DRAMA 301 – Performance Creation

Students study, apply, and critique a range of processes for making theatre and performance, paying close attention to the relationship between the approach to creation and the significance of works in the communities where they are performed.

DRAMA 306 – Production Participation 3

Students work at an intermediate level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to explore and increase proficiency in specific areas of performance creation. Areas include research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 307 – Production Participation 4

Students work at an intermediate level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to explore and increase proficiency in specific areas of performance creation. Areas include research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 311 – English Drama to 1642

The Middle Ages, the Elizabethans and Jacobeans (excluding Shakespeare), and the Spanish Golden Age.

DRAMA 312 – Survey of Dramatic Literature and Theory 3

French Neo-Classicism, the Restoration Period and Sentimental Drama.

DRAMA 313 – Survey of Dramatic Literature and Theory 4

The late 18th and 19th centuries; romanticism and naturalism.

DRAMA 314 – Survey of Dramatic Literature and Theory 5

The first part of the 20th century.

DRAMA 315 – Survey of Dramatic Literature and Theory 6

The second part of the 20th century.

DRAMA 316 – Production Participation 5

Students work at an intermediate level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to explore and increase proficiency through extensive contributions to specific areas of performance creation. Areas include research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 317 – Production Participation 6

Students work at an intermediate level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to explore and increase proficiency through extensive contributions to specific areas of performance creation. Areas include research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 318 – Musical Theatre and Musical Film

The course explores the elements that are unique to the musical, and the translation of this essentially artificial art form into theatrical and cinematic versions. It will examine in particular the distinctions between musicals based on stage productions and musicals devised exclusively for film.

DRAMA 319A – William Shakespeare in Performance

This course focuses on a major dramatist. It will consider first of all the times, the life and the work. It will then concentrate on productions of plays in various media, and include interpretations, design styles, critical reception and related topics.

DRAMA 319B – Tennessee Williams in Performance

This course focuses on a major dramatist. It will consider first of all the times, the life and the work. It will then concentrate on productions of plays in various media, and include interpretations, design styles, critical reception and related topics.

DRAMA 319C – Anton Chekhov in Performance

This course focuses on a major dramatist. It will consider first of all the times, the life and the work. It will then concentrate on productions of plays in various media, and include interpretations, design styles, critical reception and related topics.

DRAMA 319D – Stephen Sondheim in Performance

This course focuses on a major dramatist. It will consider first of all the times, the life and the work. It will then concentrate on productions of plays in various media, and include interpretations, design styles, critical reception and related topics.

DRAMA 319E – Beckett in Performance

This course focuses on the various ways in which the dramatic works of Samuel Beckett have been rendered in performance.

DRAMA 321 – Approaches to Acting with Text

Students apply conceptual and theoretical approaches to acting in traditions emphasizing the text as a resource for performance.

DRAMA 322 – Approaches to Acting with the Body

Students apply conceptual and theoretical approaches to performance in traditions emphasizing the body as a resource for performance.

DRAMA 326 – Performing the Voice

Students explore techniques to access and develop the voice as a resource for performance.

DRAMA 331 – Design Theory and Practice

Students apply conceptual and theoretical approaches to design in the areas of set/space, light, projection, and costume.

DRAMA 332 – Design for the Theatre 2

An extension of the studies described in DRAMA 331, concentrating on the practicalities of set design.

DRAMA 333 – Costume Design

This course examines the art form and practical craft of costume design for the theatre as it is practiced today. All aspects of the design and construction of stage costuming are addressed, with emphasis on text analysis, capturing a period look, fabric choice and methods of costume construction, and rendering approaches and techniques.

DRAMA 334 – Scenic Painting

Decorative painting has been part of worldwide culture since at least the Paleolithic Age. For the past four hundred years, scenic painting has been central to theatre production. This practical course examines the history, techniques and methods of this unique and ephemeral art, blending practical exercises with research work.

DRAMA 335 – History of Costume

This course surveys the development of costume, focusing primarily on fashionable clothing in Western societies from the Renaissance to today. It examines the influence of art and design movements, social roles and trends, and manufacturing and marketing methods on the changing fashionable style image of men and women. It includes the role of the fashion designer as well as theatrical and film costume design.

DRAMA 341 – Lighting Design for the Theatre 1

An introduction to the theory and practice of theatre lighting design through studio experience.

DRAMA 343 – Stage Management

Students explore approaches to stage management for theatre and performance.

DRAMA 348 – Cultural Management 1

An introduction to the problems and techniques of contemporary not-for-profit cultural management. Topics include: budgeting and financial control, marketing and board/management relations.

DRAMA 349 – Cultural Management 2

An advanced course which focuses on current and emerging issues in cultural management and policy.

DRAMA 350 – Cultural Management 3

An advanced course in management and development in the not-for-profit sector. Topics include: the context of philanthropy in Canada, understanding organizational culture and the role of the not-for-profit board in fundraising.

DRAMA 351 – Central and East European Film

Examination of the development of the motion picture art in Central and Eastern Europe after World War II. Selected work of prominent directors of the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, the former USSR, and former Yugoslavia will be discussed (Chytilova, Forman, Jancso, Makavejev, Tarkovsky, Wajda, and others). Film screenings.

DRAMA 352 – The Cinema of Science Fiction

A chronological survey of one of the most intriguing of film genres. Discussion of its aesthetic, philosophical and cinematic aspects. Film screenings will present major international works in this genre (Godard, Kubrick, Lang, Marker, Siegel, Tarkovsky, Truffaut and other directors). Film screenings.

DRAMA 353 – Contemporary Italian Film

A study of major achievements of the Italian cinema in its post- Neo-Realist period. Discussion of the works of major directors since the late 1950s (Antonioni, Bertolucci, Fellini, Olmi, Taviani, Rosi, Visconti and others). Film screenings.

DRAMA 354 – New Cinemas of East Asia (from 1985)

This course examines the role of the post-1985 East-Asian film in the development of motion picture art and the East-West cultural exchange, focusing on Chinese (Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan) and Korean cinemas. It will assist students in interpreting non-Western modes of cinematic expression. Screenings and seminar discussions will include a selection from the fifth and sixth generations of Chinese filmmakers: Hong Kong's auteur Wong Kar Wai; Taiwanese directors Hou Hsiao-hsien and Tsai Ming-liang; the achievements of Korea's master filmmaker Im Kwon-taek, and the newcomer Kim Ki-duk.

DRAMA 355 – History of Animated Film

This course will examine the historical development of the animated film and the diversity of its stylistic expression. It will focus on some of the most significant achievements of the animated form in an international context, including: Early film animation; Disney and Hollywood cartoon; two and three dimensional and live action animation in Western Europe; Czech animation; the Zagreb animation school, and the Russian animation; National Film Board of Canada and the independent US animation; Japanese tradition; recent advances in computer and experimental animation.

DRAMA 356 – History of Film 1 (1895-1940)

History of world cinema in its silent and early sound era, covering the work of outstanding directors, national productions and movements, and their contribution to the film medium's development into a prominent art form of the 20th century. Film screenings.

DRAMA 357 – History of Film 2 (after 1941)

A continuation of FINE 250/DRAMA 356. From the beginnings of the modern sound cinema (Welles) to the contemporary period. Film screenings.

DRAMA 358 – French Film After 1945

A study of major achievements of the French cinema after World War II. Discussion and comparison of the two main creative impulses of the period: the Academic tradition of the 40s and 50s, and the rebellious nouvelle vague of the 60s. (Bresson, Carne, Ophuls, Renoir, Chabrol, Godard, Malle, Truffaut, Resnais, and others.) Film screenings.

DRAMA 359 – Film and Television 1

Examination of principles of the audiovisual language and the main structural elements of the cinematic work. Discussion of the relationship between film, television and other arts/media. Film screenings.

DRAMA 360 – Film and Television 2

Development of critical judgment and expression in the area of film and television. Investigation of the role of motion pictures and TV in society. Review of major theories (Eisenstein, Bazin, Metz, Kracauer, Esslin). Film screenings.

DRAMA 361 – Approaches to Directing

Exploration of the director's task in its practical, theoretical and historical aspects.

DRAMA 362 – Directing 2

Students will be expected to form their own production company, mount a short play, and submit a detailed promptbook.

DRAMA 363 – Stage Combat

The basics of physical contact for the stage, with a strong emphasis on safety considerations. Hand-to-hand combat and work with a variety of weapons including foils are covered. In addition, aspects of fight choreography are explored, as well as falls and pratfalls.

DRAMA 366 – Writing for Performance

Students explore techniques for analyzing, interpreting, and creating texts for theatre and performance.

DRAMA 368 – Collaborative Creation

Students explore techniques for collaborative creation in theatre and performance.

DRAMA 371 – Theatre History 1

Theatre history from Classical Greece to the Renaissance.

DRAMA 372 – Theatre History 2

Theatre history from the Classical French and English Restoration periods to the present era.

DRAMA 374 – Sustainability in Performance

Students explore the interchange between artistic practice and current topics in sustainability research.

DRAMA 376 – Political Theatre and Performance

Students explore the relationships among form, political engagement, culture, and agency in theatre and performance.

DRAMA 378 – Black Theatre and Performance

Students explore the relationship of black theatre and performance to artistic and public life in North America.

DRAMA 379 – Virtual Theatre and Performance

Students explore and create theatre and performance in virtual reality.

DRAMA 380 – Canadian Drama

This course explores traditions and experiments in Canadian drama through an analysis of Canadian plays, especially those from 1960 to the present, in their historical and theatrical contexts.

DRAMA 381 – Russian Drama before 1905

A study of the origins and development of Russian drama up to 1905. Reading and critical analysis of major works in various genres with emphasis on authors of the 19th century.

DRAMA 382 – Russian Drama after 1905

A study of the origins and development of Russian drama after 1905. Reading and critical analysis of major works in various genres with emphasis on authors of the 20th century.

DRAMA 386 – Shakespeare 1

A study of the plays written before 1599-1600, excluding Julius Caesar.

DRAMA 387 – Shakespeare 2

A study of the plays written after 1599-1600, including Julius Caesar.

DRAMA 390 – Theatre for Young Audiences

Principles, methods, forms and styles of theatre for children. Children's theatre play-scripts examined and evaluated in a workshop situation.

DRAMA 391 – Women in the Theatre

A study of some of the most important female theatre artists and the diverse ways in which they have brought a female sensibility to the art form at different stages in theatre history. The course will also touch upon the issue of gender representation in theatrical production and sexual politics in the theatre.

DRAMA 392 – American Film

American Film will examine the relationship between film and the social/political movements of each decade since 1930. In this way, the course will address the medium as both chronicler of history and agent for change and/or conformity. At the same time, attention will be paid to the nature of film, its technical development and the changing approaches to acting in American films that is a direct result of the development in theatre of a specific and distinctive American acting style.

DRAMA 393 – Plays on Film

The course examines the relationship between stage and film. A number of play scripts and their film adaptations are examined, concentrating on how a filmmaker manipulates stage text to create a film text.

DRAMA 394 – The New Hollywood

The course examines the impact of European New Wave films of the late 1950s and early 1960s on American filmmaking, focusing on the revolutionary changes evident during the later 1960s and the 1970s. The course considers the work of filmmakers such as Bogdanovich, Cimino, Coppola, Peckinpah, Penn, Scorsese and others.

DRAMA 395 – Modern British Film

The course examines British film as a political expression of the changing British class system, from pre-war and interwar expressions of the social classes in films such as CAVALCADE and BRIEF ENCOUNTER, through the swift changes of the 1950s and early 1960s in films by Reisz, Richardson and Anderson, and the swinging London of the mid-to-late 1960s, up to the present day. The course focuses on the way the films parallel British social and political change.

DRAMA 396 – Film Noir

The principal focus will be on the American "noir" films between 1940-55, the period during which the genre itself was defined and developed. Beyond the style and the techniques of this unique world of film, the parallels between cinema noir and America's social and political pressures will be examined. The course will include the neo-Noir school, the filmmakers who 'borrowed' from the originators by re-applying the basics to the changing times in the 1970's and beyond.

DRAMA 397 – Women and Film

The study of selected film texts is informed by contemporary critical readings in feminist and film theory. Subjects addressed may include representation, fetishism and the gaze, female spectatorship, women's genres (e.g., melodrama, romance), female stereotypes (e.g., the femme fatale) and women's documentary film.

DRAMA 400 – Collaborative Performance Project

Students work at an advanced, independent level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to create and reflect upon a major, collaborative performance project. As core members of the creative team, students engage in all areas of project creation, including research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 401 – Acting Styles

Examines American and British acting styles from 1945 - 1965 through a study of representative films. The evolution of contemporary techniques and styles is considered, first by exploring the dominant methods in each country from the mid-century, and then by observing an increasing similarity between the two.

DRAMA 402 – Political Theatre

Considers the politics of governing, religion, family, marriage, work, race, gender and sexual orientation as they are expressed and commented on in a variety of contemporary, international play texts. Class discussion focuses on both the texts and the society that gave rise to each playwright's passions.

DRAMA 403 – Theories of the Modern Theatre

An examination of the writings of selected theorists and practitioners of the modern theatre in terms of their contrasting ideas on the kind of expression and communication possible through the medium of theatre. Their works will be studied in relation to each other and to concurrent social, political, and aesthetic developments.

DRAMA 404 – Genre

A study of the various dramatic genres and sub-genres in terms of their distinguishing characteristics. Selected plays from various periods in theatre history will be examined on the basis of some of the most significant theoretical writings in the field. The usefulness of genre distinctions will be tested against plays/performances which appear to transcend them.

DRAMA 405 – Theatre and the New Media

The primary objective of this course is to investigate ways in which new media technologies have been, and can be, applied in theatrical practice. It examines the range of opportunities and challenges this synthesis poses and provides students with some of the insights and skills required to apply new media technologies in a theatrical context. On the basis of such practical and theoretical study, students will also engage in projects which explore creatively the coalition between theatre and the new media.

DRAMA 406 – Production Participation 7

Students work at an advanced, independent level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to create and reflect upon a major, collaborative performance project. Students engage in all areas of project creation, including research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 407 – Production Participation 8

Students work at an intermediate level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to explore and increase proficiency in specific areas of performance creation. Areas include research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 409 – Theatre Criticism

Study and practice of the criticism of theatre production and performance.

DRAMA 410 – Collaborative Performance Project

Students work at an advanced, independent level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to create and reflect upon a major, collaborative performance project. As core members of the creative team, students engage in all areas of project creation, including research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 416 – Production Participation 9

Students work at an advanced, independent level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to create and reflect upon a major, collaborative performance project. Through extensive contributions to production, students engage in all areas of project creation, including research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 417 – Production Participation 10

Students work at an advanced, independent level with faculty, staff, and visiting artists to create and reflect upon a major, collaborative performance project. Through extensive contributions to production, students engage in all areas of project creation, including research, conception, writing, direction, design, performance, production, stage management, production management, publicity, dramaturgy, critique, and documentation.

DRAMA 421 – Advanced Acting Workshop 1

An intensive workshop designed to develop performance skills. Special attention given to individual acting problems.

DRAMA 422 – Advanced Acting Workshop 2

An extension of DRAMA 421.

DRAMA 425 – Audition Technique and Professional Orientation

An intensive approach to monologue work, this course will prepare students for the audition process. Time will also be devoted to learning about the demands of the theatre profession, and the problems faced by the self-employed artist.

DRAMA 426 – Advanced Voice Technique

An advanced workshop course in voice for the actor and speaker designed to continue the exploration of voice technique in DRAMA/SPCOM 326.

DRAMA 440 – Performative Inquiry and Practice

This course explores how to create, perform and analyze performance texts, here defined as including drama/theatre texts, poetry, narratives, and the texts of everyday life. Through readings and creative investigation, students will explore the links between the participant, the researcher, the site and the impulse of inquiry.

DRAMA 443 – Theatre Technology and Management Apprenticeship 1

An advanced course. Selected students are apprenticed in theatre technology or management functions in productions both on and off campus.

DRAMA 490 – Selected Seminars in Drama & Theatre Arts

Seminars in special areas of drama and theatre.

DRAMA 491 – Selected Seminars in Drama & Theatre Arts

Seminars in special areas of drama and theatre.

DRAMA 499A – Senior Seminar

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to complete a comprehensive presentation in her/his major area of concentration.

DRAMA 499B – Senior Seminar

This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to complete a comprehensive presentation in her/his major area of concentration. Second part of DRAMA/SPCOM 499.