Zachary Seguin

ANTH Courses

ANTH 100 – Introduction to Anthropology

Anthropology aims at understanding what it is to be human and to examine how humanity is manifested in the diversity of cultures and societies across time and space. This course gives the student an overview of the breadth of anthropology and orients them toward thinking anthropologically in our shared worlds.

ANTH 101 – Human and Cultural Evolution

This course surveys the evolution of the human species and outlines our cultural development from the earliest tool use through the beginnings of civilization. Lecture topics include evolutionary theory, human and primate fossil remains, and archaeological evidence concerning the origins and development of culture.

ANTH 102 – Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

The dynamic nature of cultural systems is examined. Topics include language, technology, social organization, economics, politics, and religion. Data are drawn from a broad global and historical ethnographic base.

ANTH 103 – The Nature of Language

A general introduction to the scientific study of language. Lectures on the nature of human language as compared with animal communication, some of the basic methods of historical and descriptive linguistics, and the importance of language in culture and society.

ANTH 201 – Introduction to Archaeology

An introduction to the working assumptions, analytic approaches, and integrative and descriptive methods of archaeological anthropology.

ANTH 202 – Social and Cultural Anthropology

This course introduces students to the history and key concepts of social and cultural anthropology through the examination of classic works as well as contemporary ethnographic texts and films. Topics include anthropological approaches to understanding cultural identity and difference, social structure, kinship, politics, and exchange.

ANTH 203 – The Archaeology of North America

This is a general introduction to North American Archaeology. The traditional cultural ecological approach is used.

ANTH 204 – Biological Anthropology

This course surveys the lines of inquiry in biological anthropology, including evolutionary theory, anthropological genetics, primatology, hominin fossil record, osteology and skeletal biology, and modern human biocultural adaptations. A laboratory component provides students an experiential approach to the material.

ANTH 210 – Anthropology Through Science Fiction

Basic anthropological concepts, such as evolution, culture, gender adaptability and culture contact will be explored through examples from science fiction and related anthropological studies.

ANTH 221 – Language and Society

This course introduces students to the study of language and culture. Topics covered include language socialization, narrative, the politics of multilingualism, and hate speech.

ANTH 222 – Anthropologies of the Body

Drawing upon diverse anthropological perspectives, this course takes a holistic biocultural approach to exploring what human bodies are, what they are used for, by whom, for what purposes, and how we come to know such things.

ANTH 229 – Peoples of Africa

A comparative survey of selected societies in Africa. Topics covered include traditional and changing religious, social, economic and political systems, colonialism and its legacy and current issues and culture as reflected in art, literature and the media.

ANTH 230 – Native Peoples of Canada

First Nations of the Subarctic, Northeast, Plains, Plateau, and Northwest Coast culture areas are described as they existed when initially contacted by Europeans. Consideration is given to economic adaptation, social organization, political structure, material culture, ritual and mythology.

ANTH 233 – Inuit Cultures

An examination of Inuit and Eskimo cultures of Alaska, Canada, and Greenland from their prehistoric origins to the present. Administrative systems imposed upon the Inuit and Eskimo will be analyzed and compared, as will the contemporary problems these communities face.

ANTH 241 – Food as Culture

The course addresses the topic of food from an anthropological perspective. It examines how the acquisition of food has shaped human biology and forms of social organization. Topics examined include the relationship of food to colonialism, political economy, ritual, and taboo.

ANTH 245 – Anthropology of Education

This course examines anthropological approaches to the study of education. Topics include classroom discourse, social reproduction, development, citizenship, power, and governmentality.

ANTH 260 – Human Evolution

Data, methods and theory in the study of the origin and evolution of humans are surveyed. Topics will include genetic theory, primate evolution, human fossils and modern human adaptation.

ANTH 261 – Primate Behaviour

An introduction to the behaviour of non-human primates and its relevance to human evolution. Topics will include social organization, ecology, conservation, and communication, as well as the history of primate studies.

ANTH 272 – Issues in Contemporary Indigenous Communities in Canada

An examination of First Nations and Métis cultures and cultural development from the perspective of local indigenous communities. The course will feature lectures, discussions, and occasional guest speakers representative of the wider indigenous community.

ANTH 289 – Special Topics in Anthropology

Analysis of a special topic in anthropology, as announced by the department.

ANTH 290 – Visual Anthropology

This course examines relations between culture and vision, the history of photography in anthropological research, and ethnographic film and its ethical implications. Topics include the roles of museums and representation, indigenous media, advocacy, and activism.

ANTH 300 – Practicing Anthropology

Thinking anthropologically means bringing observations and empirical findings into a dialogue with theoretical approaches. This course explores how anthropologists have developed the methods they use, considers how they interpret their findings through such lenses as functionalism and structuralism, and examines how they formulate critiques of fieldwork.

ANTH 302 – Anthropology of Violence: Political Conflict and Change

In this course, we explore anthropological perspectives on political violence and conflict. Emphasis will be placed on developing an anthropological understanding of structural, direct, and symbolic violence, memorialization and recovery, and the conduct of fieldwork in violent contexts.

ANTH 303 – Anthropology of Digital Media

This course examines diverse forms of digital media and associated practices anthropologically and inquires into the social orders and cultural assumptions that sustain them or are themselves sustained by them. Topics include social media, virtual worlds, and hacker activism.

ANTH 305 – Paleopathology of Health and Disease

This course introduces students to the identification and interpretation of skeletal evidence for disease, ancient and modern concepts of health and disease, and current clinical interpretations of skeletal pathologies. Topics include pathology in archaeological remains and the process of developing a differential diagnosis of skeletal lesions.

ANTH 309 – The Archaeology of North America

This course examines past Aboriginal lifeways in North America north of Mexico from the time of earliest settlement to contact with Europeans. It provides a broad survey of space-time systematics as well as conceptual, methodological, and ethical issues relevant to study of the North American archaeological record.

ANTH 311 – Anthropology of Religion

This course examines how religion has been studied as an object of anthropological inquiry. Topics may include ritual, magic, witchcraft, symbolism, cosmology, the relation between beliefs and practices, as well as the mutual influences of religion, politics, nationalism, and socioeconomic change.

ANTH 320 – Hunter-Gatherer Archaeology

Detailed consideration of prehistoric cultural developments from earliest toolmaking to the transition to agriculture. An examination of the human mode of adaptation and the increasing complexity of cultural systems among prehistoric hunters and gatherers. Areas and periods of emphasis will vary from year to year.

ANTH 321 – Archaeology of Complex Cultures

Cultural development from the agricultural revolution to the rise of literacy. Special attention to the development of agriculture as a means of subsistence and to the rise of early civilization. Areas and periods of emphasis will vary from year to year.

ANTH 322 – The Archaeology of the Great Lakes Area

An in-depth study of the archaeological evidence for prehistoric cultures in the Great Lakes area from their arrival ca. 11,000 years ago to the coming of Europeans. Cultural ecology and cultural evolution will be stressed.

ANTH 330 – Environmental Anthropology

This course examines the relationships between environments and human societies, focusing on the nature/culture divide and social and economic organization. Topics may include politics and practice, the influence of globalization, and regional perspectives.

ANTH 335 – Arctic Archaeology

A detailed examination of the prehistoric development of human adaptations to the Inuit-Eskimo region of Arctic North America, eastern Siberia, and Greenland. Topics covered will include the ecology of the Arctic and the culture history of the peoples who first colonized the region as revealed by archaeological research.

ANTH 345 – Directed Research in Anthropology

This course provides selected students with an opportunity to work (up to a maximum of eight hours per week over one term) as apprentices with a specific instructor on a research project in which the instructor is currently engaged.

ANTH 347 – Medical Anthropology

This course teaches students the fundamentals of anthropological approaches to illness, health, medicine, and bioethics. It covers the history of medical anthropology as well as major movements, debates, and current topics. Topics include cross-cultural healing systems, social suffering, and concerns raised by new biomedical technologies and within global health.

ANTH 348 – Anthropology of Tourism

This course examines the nature of tourism as cross-cultural contact and critiques the phenomena of mass travel and globalized tourism. The various perspectives of anthropologists and tourists in understanding culture will be explored.

ANTH 350 – Anthropology of Gender

This course examines anthropological perspectives on variations in gender roles and systems through the comparison of ethnographies. Topics include the relationship of gender to social organization, sexuality, economic and political processes, belief systems, and social movements.

ANTH 351 – Indigenous Practices & Relations: A Comparative Approach

An examination of the legal, social, and cultural position of indigenous communities within the nation-state. The course will compare Canada's relationships to those in the United States, New Zealand and/or Australia, and South America.

ANTH 352 – Anthropological Thought

An examination of the development of anthropological theory. The primary emphasis will be on modern and post-modern perspectives.

ANTH 355 – Human Osteology

A laboratory course in the anatomy and function of the human skeleton with an emphasis on recovering and identifying skeletal remains from archaeological and forensic contexts.

ANTH 361 – Biocultural Examination of Primate Conservation

This course examines the science of conservation biology, with a focus on the Order Primates and discusses the primary threats to primates in the wild, such as habitat alteration and hunting. It also examines and evaluates competing conservation strategies, in light of their ramifications for both the human and nonhuman residents.

ANTH 365 – Human Evolution

This course reviews the evolutionary history of humans. It includes an examination of the hominin fossil record, evidence from genetic analyses, and behavioural inferences that have been drawn from nonhuman primate models. Emphasis is placed on the process of knowledge production and interpretation, and the representation of human evolution in the public realm.

ANTH 370 – Issues in Contemporary Native Communities in Canada

Selected aspects of the contemporary native experience as defined by the local native community. The topics examined will be placed in historical perspective. Specially selected course lecturers will be representative of the wider native community.

ANTH 371 – Anthropological Field Experience

This course features a combination of academic content and field experience.

ANTH 372 – Archaeological Field School

Data gathering techniques are studied and applied in field work on archaeological sites. Enrolment is limited.

ANTH 377 – Dental Anthropology

This course introduces students to the analysis of human teeth, which is of central importance to paleopathology, paleoanthropology, forensic science, and contemporary human biomonitoring research. Students will also gain hands-on experience with laboratory techniques as they explore how to address anthropological questions with their data.

ANTH 380 – Matrilineal Societies in Aboriginal North America

The presence of kinship groups based upon matrilineal descent was a widespread, if scattered, phenomenon in aboriginal North America and the place of matrilineal kin groups in the evolution of human society has been subject to debate within anthropological theory. Selected societies - such as the Iroquois, Cherokee, Crow, Navajo, Hopi, and the Haida - will be examined to reveal the impact of a matrilineal system of descent on the economic, socio-political, and ideological structure of these groups.

ANTH 381 – Anthropology of South Asia

An introduction to culture and society in South Asia, focusing on caste, kinship, gender, religion, material culture, regional and national identity, ethnic conflict, globalization, and life in the diaspora.

ANTH 382 – Anthropology of Contemporary China

This course explores cultural and social change in contemporary China, including Taiwan, Hong Kong, and global migration. Topics include politics, identity, medicine and disease, urbanization, food security, post-colonialism and transnationalism.

ANTH 389 – Special Topics in Anthropology

Analysis of a special topic in anthropology, as announced by the department.

ANTH 390A – Reading in Anthropology

Guided reading in a selected portion of the anthropological literature.

ANTH 390B – Reading in Anthropology

Guided reading in a selected portion of the anthropological literature.

ANTH 391 – Reading in Anthropology

Student-initiated independent research on a selected topic. A high standard of written work is required.

ANTH 393 – Reading in Anthropology

Guided reading in a selected portion of the anthropological literature.

ANTH 395 – Anthropological Study Abroad

This course features a combination of academic study and first-hand field study of cultures and visits to or work experience at museums and archaeological sites.

ANTH 400 – Special Topics in Anthropology

Seminar on current topics in Anthropology. Focus will vary from year to year.

ANTH 402 – Palestine/Israel: Anthropological Perspectives

In this seminar, we explore contemporary ethnographies of Israel and Palestine. Emphasis will be placed on developing an anthropological understanding of historical and commemorative narratives, diaspora and exile communities, gender, political organization and the law, migrant labour, peace and human rights activism, and war.

ANTH 403 – Anthropological Inquiry into the Origin of Language and Cultural Behaviour

This seminar course will explore the origins of language and cultural behaviour from a biological anthropology perspective, addressing the question of how the ability to produce a complex symbolic system evolved in humans. The course will integrate multiple fields of anthropological inquiry, including human and primate evolution, primate behaviour and cognition, and anthropological linguistics.

ANTH 404 – Human Development in a Cross-Cultural Perspective

Seminar in current issues in the anthropology of the life cycle. This course will deal with child rearing, young adulthood, aging and the female and male life cycles, among other topics, from the perspectives of various cultures.

ANTH 411 – Symbolic Anthropology

This course is an advanced version of ANTH 311, restricted to Honours students in Anthropology. Students will attend lectures in ANTH 311 and complete the readings for that course, but will also be required to write a substantial research paper and gain broader and deeper familiarity with the anthropological literature in this field.

ANTH 415 – Archaeologies of Landscape

This course examines the ways in which past peoples experienced, transformed, remembered, represented, and controlled landscapes. Readings and discussions emphasize both contemporary theoretical approaches and case studies from various settings in an effort to illuminate the social, political, economic, and ideological dimensions of landscape.

ANTH 420 – Social and Cultural Change

An analysis of contemporary thought on culture contact and cultural evolution. The concepts explored might include integration, assimilation, conflict, nativistic reactions, and general and specific evolution.

ANTH 430 – Science as Practice and Culture

An examination of science as being constituted by practices which are inevitably social and cultural, as well as of scientific expertise in contemporary issues of new technology, biomedicine, and environmental conflict.

ANTH 440 – Archaeological Analysis and Interpretation

A study of contemporary archaeological method and theory with emphasis on the process of deriving inferences concerning past peoples and societies from different kinds of archaeological materials and data. Students will be required to carry out an analysis of an actual archaeological assemblage. Specific topics will vary from year to year.

ANTH 447 – Seminar in Medical Anthropology

This seminar course is a close examination of selected current topics within medical anthropology. It builds upon approaches and content from ANTH 347, and readings include at least two ethnographic manuscripts.

ANTH 455 – Skeletal Biology and Forensics

This laboratory course focuses on the evaluation of human skeletal remains in archaeological and forensic contexts. Topics include determination of basic biological categories, e.g., age, sex, race, evaluation of paleopathological conditions, and aspects of forensic anthropology.

ANTH 460 – Human Adaptation and Variation

An examination of the principles of variation in human evolution past and present. Topics will include adaptation of modern populations to altitude, temperature, and disease.

ANTH 461 – Selected Topics in Primate Behaviour

This course focuses on methodological and ideational aspects of studying primate behaviour. Topics include fieldwork methods, comparative theoretical approaches, mother-infant interaction, infanticide, socialization and communications patterns.

ANTH 465 – Borders, Boundaries, and Crossings

This seminar covers anthropological perspectives on the relationship between state borders and socio-cultural boundaries (across race, gender, class, language, and religion). Readings include ethnographies about contested borders, border dwellers, and border crossers.

ANTH 470 – Archaeological Field Methods

Data gathering techniques will be studied and applied in field work on archaeological sites. Enrolment is limited.

ANTH 489 – Special Topics in Anthropology

Analysis of a special topic in anthropology, as announced by the department.

ANTH 492A – Reading in Anthropology

Guided reading in a selected portion of the anthropological literature.

ANTH 492B – Reading in Anthropology

Guided reading in a selected portion of the anthropological literature.

ANTH 495 – Reading in Anthropology

Guided reading in a selected portion of the anthropological literature.

ANTH 497 – Reading in Anthropology

Guided reading in a selected portion of the anthropological literature.

ANTH 498 – Anthropology Capstone

This course explores themes of current anthropological research as they intersect across the major subfields of the discipline. Topics may vary.

ANTH 499A – Honours Essay

Directed reading and research in a selected area of anthropology inquiry.

ANTH 499B – Honours Essay

Directed reading and research in a selected area of anthropology inquiry.

ANTH 600 – Public Issues Anthropology

An examination of the application of anthropological knowledge to public issues. The issues studied will vary from year to year; they may include such topics as race and ethnicity, citizenship and the state, marriage and sexuality, conservation and the environment, and the ownership, interpretation and display of artifacts and human remains. Students will present their research in forms appropriate to both academic and general audiences.

ANTH 604 – Human Development in a Cross-Cultural Perspective

Seminar in current issues in the anthropology of the life cycle. This course will deal with child rearing, young adulthood, aging and the female and male life cycles, among other topics, from the perspective of various cultures.

ANTH 605 – Selected Topics in Theory and Research

This course will be offered with varying content focusing on theory or research.

ANTH 608 – Anthropological Theory

An examination of classical and contemporary anthropological theory, including an emphasis on the most recent directions in the discipline.

ANTH 614 – Research Methods

An examination of the methods of qualitative research, including participant observation and unstructured interviews, as well as the ethical considerations of fieldwork. Other topics, such as comparative and historical methods, may be included.

ANTH 655 – Skeletal Biology and Forensics

This laboratory course will focus on the evaluation of human skeletal remains in archaeological and forensic contexts. Topics will include determination of basic biological categories, e.g., age, sex, race, evaluation of paleopathological conditions, and aspects of forensic anthropology.

ANTH 659 – Conservation, Communities and Globalization

Biological anthropology has a long history of examining our closest living relatives, the nonhuman primates. Increasingly, these species are threatened by extinction, which brings to light larger questions regarding our place in the natural world. Anthropology is uniquely positioned to examine the interaction between efforts to conserve biodiversity and natural resources, community rights, and globalization. This course will focus on attempts to balance the preservation of nature within the health and socioeconomic well-being of neighbouring communities, and how these relationships are affected by processes of globalization. Other topics such as the effects of climate change, heritage management, and indigenous rights may be addressed.

ANTH 660 – Reading Course

A program of directed reading, complemented with the writing of papers or participation in research. Reading courses are arranged by students through their advisors or advisory committees and must be approved by the graduate chair of the department. This course may be repeated provided different content is involved.

ANTH 661 – Research Seminar in Public Issues Anthropology

The objective is to write a research paper in Public Issues Anthropology. In this course, you will learn how to craft a research statement, construct a theoretical model, and interpret, analyze and communicate your results.

ANTH 662 – Human Adaptation and Evolution

An examination of the Principles of Variation in human evolution past and present. This will include the development of the genus Homo, adaptation of modern populations to heat, cold, altitude and stress, and the continuing micro-evolutionary development of humans.